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597 adjectives to describe « dreams »

597 adjectives to describe « dreams »

  • He is discovered by the figure at the same instant, and a piercing scream, so loud, prolonged, and ear-splitting that it echoes over the house, ends the wild dream of the marauders.
  • Our Cockney informant imagines that M. ABOUT, like his distinguished ancestor, (ABOU, B.A.,) found his "sweet dream of peace" too rudely disturbed by the howlings of the Prussian dogs of war, and decided to 'ead About for Paris, simply in order to avoid being 'eaded off by the enemy.
  • I don't like to be woke up, when rounding a pleasant dream, by their growling and screaming, spitting and whining, groaning and crying, and the hundred other nameless noises by which they frighten sleep from our pillows.
  • But it was the look of the night, the meaning on her face that Willie cared most about, and desired so much to see, that he was at times quite unhappy to think that he never could wake up, not although ever so many strange and lovely dreams might be passing before his window.
  • Some day she would be free to carry out this beautiful dream of hers.
  • The cold bed on the shore would be warmed for me by happy dreams.
  • Oh, it was a rich-hued, golden, glowing dream; a dream such as men's souls don't formulate in these stale daysnot our kind of men.
  • O'Flynn's brogue, which had amused them, grew to be just part of the hardship and barbarism that had overtaken them like an evil dream, coercing, subduing all the forces of life.
  • it was a bright, beautiful dream, Kate, the life of those few months.
  • His illusion was at first explained as the effect of a peculiarly vivid dream; but when he declared his intention of actually holding a service and conducting a procession for the weal of his namesake and predecessor, the conviction became universal that the rats had effected a lodgement in his Holiness's upper storeys.
  • Wakening from a troubled dream of fighting gophers that turned to wild-cats, Mr. Neelands, in No. 17, made a hurried toilet, on account of the temperature of the room, for although the morning was warm, No. 17 still retained some of last week's temperature, and to Mr. Neelands, accustomed to the steam heat of Mrs. Marlowe's "Select Boarding Houseyoung men a specialty"it felt very chilly, indeed.
  • "Not so, messire," answered Beltane, shaking his head, "art over young and tender, methinksgo, get thee back to her that sent theekeep thou thy fond and foolish dream, and may thy gentle heart go unbroken.
  • If a name Dearer and purer were, it should be thine; and the terrible dream of Darkness, which at least in the ghastly power of the close, where the survivors meet by the lurid light of a dim altar fire, and die of each other's hideousness, surpasses Campbell's Last Man.
  • The most characteristic examples of nationalist violence have arisen out of the War, as in the case of Poland and other newborn States, which pursue vain dreams of empire while on the verge of dissolution through sheer lack of vital strength and energy, and becoming every day more deeply engulfed in misery and ruin.
  • A phantom judge, a phantom jury, a phantom circle of faces, lacking the consideration and confidence of those I saw before me; but not a phantom prisoner, or any mere dream of outrageous shame and suffering.
  • If it had not been for that ghastly stain that had crept across the far end of her room, she might almost have thought that the events of the night had been but a fearful dream.
  • The dreadful dream of need, and lack, and want, of feeding at the hand of charity, was gone by.
  • "Hold my hand, I have such frightful dreams, and I want you near.
  • At length she spoke and told him that it was a dream, a very very idle dream, a dream that was not worth dreaming; that he must never speak of it again, never think of it, but forget it, just as he had forgotten all the other vain silly dreams he had ever had.
  • It all still seems a nightmare over England and one feels that the morning must come when one will wake up and find it has all been a hideous dream, and that peace is the reality.
  • The whole object of what I have done for you has been to set you free, as free as though you had woke up to find the episode of these Henshaws had been no more than a horrible dream.
  • Of him he had no suspicion; to him he looked for safety and for the realization of his cherished dreams.
  • From constellation to constellation the pair speed on, cleaving the blue with mighty wings, but finding in all a blank, like that in Richter's wonderful dream.
  • "Well, I've had the most awful dreams," complained Violet, turning over as if she intended to go to sleep again.
  • Some hint of Jack's discontent, or rather of his vague dream of flight, came into Dick's busy head, and when one day they were tramping down by the James together, he said, owlishly: "I say, Jack, when Vincent goes, let us clear out!"
  • As a little boy, "life on the ocean wave" was to John Franklin a delightful day-dream.
  • Thereafter he went his way, very sad and thoughtful, and that night, lying upon his bed, he heard the voices of the trees sighing and murmuring one to another like souls that sorrowed for sin's sake, and broken dreams and ideals.
  • That famous Rosycrusian, who yesterday visited me, and told me the Emperor of the Moon was in love with a fair MortalThis Dream is Inspiration in this FellowHe must have wondrous Virtue in him, to be worthy of these divine Intelligences.
  • 225 From such romantic dreams, my soul, awake!
  • And when this young woman found herself thus transported into the midst of the world, thus realizing all the fantastic dreams of her youth, can you wonder at the intoxication of it?
  • He said one morning with some indirectness: 'I had such a lovely dream last night, Mother.'
  • But while we were flattering ourselves with those pleasing dreams, we were wakened on a sudden with an astonishing account that the Spaniards had left Cadiz, and, without any interruption from the Britons, were taking in provisions at Ferrol.
  • Thou hast still one selfish hope, one dream of bliss, however impossible, yet still cherished.
  • They have broken your heart, I know; And the rainbow gleams Of your youthful dreams Are things of the long ago; But heaven holds all for which you sigh, There!
  • Morange's scheme of leaving the Beauchene works and entering the service of the Credit National, where he would speedily rise to a high and lucrative position, his hope too of giving Reine a big dowry and marrying her off to advantageall the ambitious dreams of rank and wealth in which his wife and he had indulged, now showed no likelihood of fulfilment, since it seemed probable that Valerie might again have a child.
  • Peter flicked the dust from his tan shoes with a polka-dotted handkerchief, while rosy dreams, full of ambition and success filled his impressionable mind.
  • The "Moses" of Michelangelo beheld God, heard that voice of thunder, and bears the terrible impress of what he saw and heard on Mount Sinai: his profound eye is scrutinizing the mysteries he vaguely sees in his prophetic dreams.
  • That was his sole idea; it took no more precise shape; at the thought of realizing it he was carried off into splendid dreams.
  • Peace fell upon the old house at last, and all slept as if some magic herb had touched their eyelids, bringing blissful dreams and a glad awakening.
  • Funny dream, wasn't it?
  • It was a very curious dream.
  • Of this kind, for instance, is the following remarkable dream, as related and explained in the works of professor Maas of Halle: "I dreamed once," says he "that the Pope visited me.
  • But now they realized that playing football in the second year at Annapolis must be, for them, merely a foolish dream.
  • It mingled in every feverish dream, became the embodiment of every vision.
  • BEGGAR O Gentlemen, I thank you; I've had the saddest dream that ever troubled
  • Put it how we will, it cannot be denied that belief in divination, in diabolic possession, and in magic, has largely contributed to belief in spirits; and that to ignore this contribution by throwing the whole burden on ordinary dreams is unscientific.
  • His mind however was disturbed by the entrance of the officer, and though he wooed back the gentle dream, it had lost much of its charm and brightness.
  • A century ago the very idea of a stable federation of forty powerful states, covering a territory nearly equal in area to the whole of Europe, carried on by a republican government elected by universal suffrage, and guaranteeing to every tiniest village its full meed of local independence,the very idea of all this would have been scouted as a thoroughly impracticable Utopian dream.
  • "There's a perfect dream of a view from here and it's so cool and shady."
  • Hah, Pisaro, I had such a Dream, Such a fine flattering Dream Pis.
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