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39 Metaphors for « bacon »

39 Metaphors for « bacon »

  • Mr. Drummond answered: "Bacon is a young man who has not yet arrived at thirty years.
  • Frank Bacon (January 16, 1864 November 19, 1922), was an American character actor and playwright.
  • Francis Bacon was the youngest son of the Lord Keeper, and was born in London, Jan. 22, 1561.
  • Bacon was the article most sought for.
  • Bacon was a great benefactor when he separated the world of physical Nature from the world of Mind; and Pascal was equally a profound philosopher when he showed that faith could not take cognizance of science, nor science of faith.
  • Bacon was 40 cents.
  • Bacon, the founder of modern experimental philosophy, and of whom it may be said that he carried in his pocket all that even in this eighteenth century merits the name of philosophy, was a contemporary of Shakespeare.
  • The following persons have co-operated in preparing the present volume: Leonard Bacon (verses in "Poverty Is No Crime"), Florence Noyes (suggestions on the style of all the plays),
  • What Bacon was to philosophy, Dante and Petrarch to poetry, Michael Angelo and Raphael to painting, Columbus and Gama to geography, Copernicus and Galileo to astronomy, Gonthier was in France to the art of cookery.
  • Bacon, who professed orthodoxy, was perhaps at heart a deist, but in any case the whole spirit of his writings was to exclude authority from the domain of scientific investigation which he did so much to stimulate.
  • Bacon and cabbage is a very favourite dish; but only a good stomach can digest it.
  • Thus 'ox,' 'steer,' 'cow,' are Saxon, but 'beef' is Norman; 'calf' is Saxon, but 'veal' Norman; 'sheep' is Saxon, but 'mutton' Norman; so it is severally with 'deer' and 'venison,' 'swine' and 'pork,' 'fowl' and 'pullet.' 'Bacon,' the only flesh which, perhaps, ever came within his reach, is the single exception.
  • Bacon was not the father of the inductive principle, as is sometimes wrongly stated; for prehistoric man was compelled to make inductions before he could advance one step from barbarism.
  • "Dey wa'n't no bacon stole' fer a week
  • In this state the bacon remains a fortnight, which is sufficient for flitches cut from nogs of a carcass weight less than 15 stone (14 lbs.
  • [T.S.]] To come to our own country: My Lord Bacon was a great freethinker, when he tells us, that whatever has the least relation to religion, is particularly liable to suspicion; by which he seems to suspect all the facts whereon most of the superstitions (that is to say, what the priests call the religions) of the world are grounded.
  • Bacon, Roger, b. about 1214, at or near Ilchester; became a friar of the Franciscan Order; studied natural philosophy and wrote, besides other works, the "Opus Majus" (described as "at once the 'Encyclopaedia' and the 'Organon' of the 13th century"); d. 1294.
  • Our author to avoid any impertinence which the captain was likely to be guilty of towards him, told him, Sir Edmund Bacon, the person with whom he travelled, was the grandchild of the great lord Verulam, High Chancelor of England, whose fame was extended to every country where science and philosophy prevailed, and that they were protected by the earl of Hertford, the English embassador at Brussels.
  • Bacon for fricandeau, poultry, and game, should be about 2 inches in length, and rather more than one-eighth of an inch in width.
  • This same feeling was largely shared by the colored people, and, while it was no infrequent thing for the "smoke-house"where the bacon was keptto be broken open in ante-war times, taking the risk of detection and dogs, it was almost an unheard-of occurrence that a sheep was stolen.
  • Bacon, though a utilitarian philosopher, was such a lover of flowers that he was never satisfied unless he saw them in almost every room of his house, and when he came to discourse of them in his Essays, his thoughts involuntarily moved harmonious numbers.
  • Fat bacon is the basis of all cookery in Guyenne and Upper Languedoc, where the winters are too cold for the olive to flourish, and where butter is rarely seen.
  • Great as a student of physical nature, Bacon was a master in the knowledge of human nature.
  • Indeed, there are millions of truths that a man is not, or may not think himself concerned to know; as whether our king Richard the Third was crooked or no; or whether Roger Bacon was a mathematician or a magician.
  • Bacon became a member of the council for the Virginia Company in 1609.
  • Instead of bacon, chops, steak, or Frankfurters may be roasted, as well as corn in season, but bacon is the least messy to eat.
  • In one of the notes to The English Garden it is stated that "Bacon was the prophet, Milton the herald of modern Gardening; and Addison, Pope, and Kent the champions of true taste."
  • Roger Bacon, philosopher and scientist, was a native of the town or immediate neighbourhood.
  • When Bacon was nineteen, his father died.
  • The Prose Writers, of whom Bacon is the most notable.
  • BACON'S PLACE AND WORK.
  • In one of the notes to The English Garden it is stated that "Bacon was the prophet, Milton the herald of modern Gardening; and Addison, Pope, and Kent the champions of true taste."
  • BACON'S REBELLION against Berkeley in Virginia, one hundred years before independence.
  • As bacon is frequently excessively salt, let it be soaked in warm water for an hour or two previous to dressing it; then pare off the rusty parts, and scrape the under-side and rind as clean as possible.
  • Bacon was a scholar, but even more a philosopher and a statesman.
  • Lord Bacon, who, to be sure, was less a fine soul than a fine mind, was a scoundrel.
  • His monument, of which Bacon was the sculptor, is placed in Westminster Abbey, near that of Gray, with the following inscription: Optimo Viro Gulielmo Mason, A.M. Poetae, Si quis alius Culto, Casto, Pio Sacrum.
  • We admit that Bacon was a sinner; but was he a sinner above all others who cast stones at Jerusalem?
  • "Nathaniel Bacon," was the answer.

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