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3986 collocations for « meaner »

3986 collocations for « meaner »

  • A word may mean one thing by itself.
  • Yet, to let go, would have meant certain death to the old fellow, and the thought spurred me to greater exertions.
  • But perhaps he means no harm, Bruce.
  • That meant a lot of money, a fat lot of money.
  • This does not necessarily mean the men with the longest string of academic degrees, the men who can write the best poems or make the best speeches on public occasions; it means the thinking men who are brave, talented, spiritual, and warm-hearted.
  • "Yes," I objected, "but they mean business.
  • "It is something to me," he replied insistently, "because it means a great deal to you.
  • PeopleI mean the people who count in Lichfieldare charitable enough to ignore almost any crime which is just a matter of common knowledge.
  • I must tell my husbandeverything," she concluded, and manifestly not meaning a word of what she said.
  • " "That paper," she said in a low voice, "means life to me instead of a living death; it means more than I can tell you, more than even you can understand.
  • He told himself the Fates had decreed it, and the game had to be played out to the end, The principal thing now was to keep the pieces moving and prevent a checkmate, for that would mean ruin!
  • He had an important business engagement for the next day, Wednesday, which he failed to keep, and this may mean a considerable loss to him.
  • True, I would glory in themah, luxury and riches mean little to me, my dear, and I can conceive of no greater happiness than to starve with you.
  • "Oh, you mean your work among the mill girls here.
  • I mean the old Warner place."
  • In old times the capture of a nation's capital meant the end of the war, but we have seen capitals captured and the war not modified a bit by it.
  • That means war, for it is impossible to make over anybody but yourself.
  • This is sheer business, yet it means loving service for all concerned.
  • Considered in themselves, apart from the traditions of formality, these are quite good play material or stimuli, and Froebel meant the time to come "when we shall speak of the doll and the hobby horse as the first plays of the awakening life of the girl and the boy," but he died before he had done so.
  • We have nothing to wait for, I mean money or anything of that sort."
  • " "If you mean a change of administration, the upsetting of a stage, or the death of a cart-horse; they are all equally crisises, in the American vocabulary."
  • Frontier protection is not generally intended to prevent a serious attack, but means rather a kind of police action."
  • Next thing we know, with that crowd that don't mean any good to you, this family is going to find itself with a girl in trouble on its hands.
  • To the astronomer it means the world in which he lives.
  • And, though the blind chance that mismanaged the world had chained them to uncongenial, though certainly well-meaning, persons, this was no logical reason why he and Patricia should be deprived of the pleasures of intellectual intercourse.
  • And I wanted it so!that first love that means everythingthe love he gave her when I was only a messy little girl, with pig-tails and too many hands and feet!
  • "It wouldn't be quite equitable, Jack," the colonel summed it up, "if the Aline I lovedno, I don't mean the real woman, the one you and all the other people knew, the one that married the enterprising brewer and died five years agowere not waiting for me somewhere.
  • By this term they meant the power of the people to legislate directly and without the intervention of chosen representatives.
  • In all countries the losses by such cessations from labour are little as compared with those due to the spirit which in England is called "ca'-canny" or the shirking of performance of work, and of sabotage, which means the deliberate destruction of machinery in operation.
  • If, for example, when he says servant he means slave, when he says Negrophilist he means Republican, and when he says false philanthropy he means the fairest instincts of the human heart, we have a right to suspect that there is also an esoteric significance in the phrases, Loyalty to the Union, Nationality, and Conservatism.
  • "You know I've said before that I meant some day to propose to Miss Eleanor.
  • These vehicles were run by a man who was pointed out as a "character," which means a sort of licensed nuisance.
  • This means bad trouble.
  • Beulah means land of promise;that's a good omen!"
  • The divisional trains worked hard in those strenuous days, and the 'Q' staff of the Desert Mounted Corps had many a sleepless night devising plans to get that last ounce out of their transport men and to get that little extra amount of supplies to the front which meant the difference between want and a sufficiency for man and horse.
  • There in the sky, rolling up and rumbling, was the long-deferred rain-storm that meant freedom from debt, and a fortune besides.
  • The Sanscrit name means "The city of flowers."
  • By the life of prayer, many mean merely a way of learning to make public petitions, an objective appeal to God.
  • The malignant look with which these words was accompanied showed at once that the speaker meant mischief.
  • Not only would it have meant peace after war, but a peace calculated to heal the deep wounds of Europe and to renovate the economic status of nations.
  • Women are called the practical sex, and I certainly found them in England facing the fact that peace will mean an insufficient number of breadwinners to go around and that a maimed man may have low earning power.
  • Gebir, indeed, may mean the state of the hop markets last month, for anything I know to the contrary.
  • All eyes were strained on the plate-glass windows above, and they looked but for one thinga spot, black as night itself, which would mean open water above.
  • It means a spirit of independence, courage, willingness to make sacrifice.
  • The voluntary response in Britain to the call to arms has been inspiriting; and if voluntaryism means momentary delay in a crisis, still it means success in the end.
  • " Speed, mistranslating André's words, makes Perkin the son of the Jew, instead of the servant; and Bacon amplifies the error, and transforms John Osbeck into the convert Jew, who, having a handsome wife, it might be surmised why the licentious King "should become gossip in so mean a house."
  • "You mean the girl in the corridor," said Stoddard with that directness which his friends were apt to find disconcerting.
  • I didn't mean her mother."
  • "I'm glad you want me to go," he said, renewing the conversation as they started around the house, "because I wanted to and, well, anyhow it's my job" "What do you mean 'your job'?"
  • You tell them that in the Indian tongue Alaska means "the great country," they smile, and think condescendingly of savage imagery.
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