Inspirassion

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97 examples of  ad.  in sentences

97 examples of ad. in sentences

Once I answered an ad. to join a county fair.

"That 'Tew-our-Beloved-Brother' cup," she said gently, her eyes not meeting the wound in his, "we 'bout concluded yew'd better leave here fer the one what answers the ad.

It was, probably, built by this tribe about 1,200 or 1,300, AD.

Business of rejoicing ad.

The ordinary want ad.

In the semi-weekly edition of Aftonbladet, which is considered the best advertising medium in Sweden on account of its large circulation and superior class of readers, display ads.

"It 'ud do just as well if we said he 'ad.

He chucked the pot on the floor when he 'ad done, in a desprit sort o' way, and 'im and the landlord 'ad a little breeze then that did 'im more good than wot the beer 'ad.

If I'm able to show you where to put your finger on three 'undred pounds when you come 'ome it'll be the cheapest outing you have ever 'ad.

'He'ss the only real pal we ever 'ad.' "'Wot are you talking about?'

"Sam went off by 'imself, and arter walking about all the evening without a ha'penny in their pockets, Ginger Dick and Peter went off 'ome to bed and went to sleep till twelve o'clock, when Sam came in and woke 'em up to tell 'em about a music-'all he 'ad been to, and 'ow many pints he had 'ad.

"It 'ud do just as well if we said he 'ad.

He chucked the pot on the floor when he 'ad done, in a desprit sort o' way, and 'im and the landlord 'ad a little breeze then that did 'im more good than wot the beer 'ad.

If I'm able to show you where to put your finger on three 'undred pounds when you come 'ome it'll be the cheapest outing you have ever 'ad.

'He'ss the only real pal we ever 'ad.' "'Wot are you talking about?'

"Sam went off by 'imself, and arter walking about all the evening without a ha'penny in their pockets, Ginger Dick and Peter went off 'ome to bed and went to sleep till twelve o'clock, when Sam came in and woke 'em up to tell 'em about a music-'all he 'ad been to, and 'ow many pints he had 'ad.

* Self, Soul & Co., Architects: Dear Sirs; I find Your "ad."

We'd froze in for the winter, but we'd a seen things if we 'ad.

Ad. Brem. Hist.

circular, circular letter; manifesto, advertisement, ad., placard, bill, affiche^, broadside, poster; notice &c 527.

The best and noblest pal a man ever 'ad.

Hic omnis imbonitas et insuavitas consistit, ut Tertulliani verbis utar, orat. ad.

" [Footnote 37: See Ad.

"The maires and adjoints of Paris: "1st Arrondissement: Ad.

"What a lovely day we've 'ad." "So bright," said Mrs. Silk, nodding with spirit.

It ought to be ten pounds really with the trouble I've 'ad." Mr. Wilks laid the desired amount on the table, and Mr. Nathan Smith placing it in his pocket rose to go.

Fancy me being 'ad.

"What a lovely day we've 'ad.

It ought to be ten pounds really with the trouble I've 'ad." Mr. Wilks laid the desired amount on the table, and Mr. Nathan Smith placing it in his pocket rose to go.

Fancy me being 'ad.

I had sooner that every 'New Publications' ad. should die out of my newspaper than that my literary columns should be contaminated with a Lie!

| | | ad. loc.

| | Ad.

II. 106, Bauli; Ad.

London hotels may hand out free meals to the nobility and gentry for the sake o' the ad.

The following have written on him: Jos. Bach, Vienna, 1864; Ad.

The writings of Liebmann, Cohen, Stadler, Riehl, Volkelt, and others will be mentioned later, in connection with the neo-Kantian movement; here we may give some of the more important monographs and essays, selected from the enormously developed Kantian literature: Ad.

[Footnote 1: K. Ad.

The plural might be uniformly made in d, following a vowel, and if a word terminate in a consonant, then in ad.

"What I have not forgotten, Mr. Forbes, is this," he said, quietly: "That funeral that you speak of has given us one of the biggest free 'ads.'

Picking up a daily paper, he pointed to one of their attractive "ads.

"These are two old friends o' mine, Mrs. Finch," ses old Sam, giving 'em a warning look; "Captin Dick and Captin Russet, two o' the oldest and best friends a man ever 'ad.

Twel?" "Twelve shillings," ses the man; "three upper circles you've 'ad.

But of course there'll be the ads.

How about taking a little ad.

from me, just for fun, to help the game along?" "We don't accept ads.

He opened his paper now and glanced at the head-lines and at the Monday morning ads.

AD. FONTES AQUARUM.

This was the cause of contention between Agamemnon and Achillรชs, and forms the subject of Homer's epic called The Iliad. AS'WAD, son of Shedad king of Ad.

Having a kimono such as this, our housekeeper can either button himself into it with a button-hook (very good ones are supplied by Messrs. Einstein & Fickelbrot [see ad.] at a very reasonable price or even higher), or better still, he can summon the janitor of the apartment, who can button him up quite securely in a few minutes' time a quarter of an hour at the most.

Accordingly Ad.

Called him Marse Ad.

He expounds it, with very little consistency, thus: "Tรฒ, or To, ad.

Cornelia, who, with her little son, stood upon the deck of Pompey's galley, watching the scene with a peculiar intensity of solicitude which the hardy soldiers around her could not have felt, became soon exceedingly alarm ad.

R75393, 26Feb51, Maggie Fitch (C) CARTER, AD. Just kids.

SEE Tanquerey, Ad.

TANQUEREY, AD.

Abrege de theologie ascetique et mystique, par Ad.

SEE Tanquerey, Ad.

SEE Tanquerey, Ad. HUGHES, RICHARD.

TANQUEREY, AD.

SEE DOWD, MARY T. REINHARDT, AD.

SEE CALDWELL, MIMI, ad.

R75393, 26Feb51, Maggie Fitch (C) CARTER, AD. Just kids.

SEE Tanquerey, Ad.

TANQUEREY, AD.

Abrege de theologie ascetique et mystique, par Ad.

SEE Tanquerey, Ad.

SEE Tanquerey, Ad. HUGHES, RICHARD.

TANQUEREY, AD.

SEE DOWD, MARY T. REINHARDT, AD.

SEE CALDWELL, MIMI, ad.

* ABA'NDON, v.a. give up; resign, or quit; forsake; leave ABI'LITY, s. capacity; qualification; power A'BJECT, a. mean; being of no hope or regard; destitute ABLU'TION, s. the act of cleansing or washing clean; water used in washing ABO'LISH, v.a. make void; put an end to; destroy ABO'UND, v.n. have in great plenty; be in great plenty ABRE'AST, ad. side by side ABRU'PTLY, ad.

* ABA'NDON, v.a. give up; resign, or quit; forsake; leave ABI'LITY, s. capacity; qualification; power A'BJECT, a. mean; being of no hope or regard; destitute ABLU'TION, s. the act of cleansing or washing clean; water used in washing ABO'LISH, v.a. make void; put an end to; destroy ABO'UND, v.n. have in great plenty; be in great plenty ABRE'AST, ad. side by side ABRU'PTLY, ad.

It is the emblem of mourning DALMA'TIA, s. a province of Austria DALMA'TIAN, a. belonging to Dalmatia DA'MAGE, s. mischief; hurt; loss DA'NGER, s. risk; hazard; peril DA'NGEROUS, a. hazardous; perilous DA'STARDLY, ad.

for the time of the continuance EA'RLY, ad.

A fur worn by judges in England ERRO'NEOUS, a. wrong; unfounded; false; misled by error ERU'PTION, s. the act of bursting out; sudden excursion of a hostile kind ESCO'RT, v.a. convoy; guard from place to place ESPE'CIAL, a. principal; chief ESPE'CIALLY, ad.

principally; chiefly; in an uncommon degree ESPLANA'DE, s. the empty space between a citadel and the outskirts of a town ESSE'NTIAL, a. necessary to the constitution or existence of anything; important in the highest degree ESTA'BLISHMENT, s. settlement; fixed state ESTRA'NGE, v.a. keep at a distance; withdraw ETE'RNAL, a. without beginning or end; perpetual; unchanging ETE'RNALLY, ad.

incessantly; for evermore ETE'RNITY, s. duration without beginning or end ETHE'REAL, a. belonging to the higher regions EVA'PORATE, v.a. to drive away in fumes E'VENING, s. the close of the day; beginning of night EVE'NTUALLY, ad.

a. giving entertainment to strangers; kind to strangers HO'TTENTO'T, s. a native of the south of Africa HOWE'VER, ad.

Insects are so called from a separation in the middle of their bodies, whereby they are cut into two parts, which are joined together by a small ligature, as we see in wasps and common flies INSE'NSIBLY, ad.

not either; nor one nor other NICHE, s. a hollow hi which a statue may be placed NIDIFICA'TION, s. the act of building nests NI'MBLY, ad.

IN PARTICULAR, peculiarly; distinctly PARTICULARLY, ad.

PA'TIENCE, s. the power of suffering; perseverance PA'TIENTLY, ad.

not lessened in force or intensity UNACCOU'NTABLE, a. not explicable; not to be solved by reason; not subject UNA'LTERABLE, a. unchangeable; immutable UNAPRROA'CHED, a. inaccessible UNAWA'RE, ad.

I don't know why it is, but most women get up in the morning as cheerful as a breakfast-food ad., while a man will snort and paw for trouble the minute his hoofs touch the floor.

But Foreman had a pretty good opinion of himself, and a mighty big opinion of the food, and he believed that a clever, well-knit ad. was strong enough to draw teeth.

Don't let it make you feverish the next time you see one of those Won't-you-come-in-quick-and-get-rich-sudden ads.

If a man marries he wishes he 'adn't, and if he doesn't marry he wishes he 'ad.

I 'aven't anythin to do with it, an never 'ad.' He raved at her, in reply, about the position in which he had found the boxon the top of its fellow instead of underneath, where he had placed itabout the broken lock, the sovereigns she had been changing, and the things Watson had said of herwinding up with a peremptory demand for his money.

Just to show their independence they went to two music-'ails, and with a sort of idea that they was doing Isaac a bad turn they spent every farthing afore they got 'ome, and sat up in bed telling 'im about the spree they'd 'ad.

He was a man as got 'imself very much liked at fust, especially by the old ladies, owing to his being so perlite to them, that they used to 'old 'im up for an example to the other men, and say wot nice, pretty ways he 'ad.

Here his fortunes prospered for a time, and Soliman, sultan of Nicea, son of the grand Soliman, sought his alliance, and married his daughter, about AD. 1093.

Done at the City of Washington the sixth day of July, AD. 1835, and of the independence of the United States and sixtieth.

'But this opinion can be held to be quite true only while we look at the outside of the negro's religion, or estimate its significance from arbitrary pre-suppositions, as is specially the case with Ad.

But my wife reads other people's ads.

" "Why, we are just going to press, sir," the editor said, "but we'll be only too glad to hold the edition for your ad.