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1868 examples of  belgium  in sentences

1868 examples of belgium in sentences

The duration of the siege compared with the length of time it took the Germans to capture such strongholds as Liรจge, Namur and Antwerp was due to two causes, one being the desire of the Russians to keep the loss of life among the besieging army at a minimum, the other to the lack of great guns which the Germans had in Belgium.

Here, for three days, the Germans succeeded in pushing forward, driving a wedge for several miles into the line of the allied armies of England, France and Belgium.

R. A. J. Warneford, a Canadian aviator, when alone in an aeroplane, he destroyed a Zeppelin airship with its crew of twenty-eight men in Belgium.

With the question of Grecian intervention out of the way, the Allies then occupied themselves with the attitude of Rumania and the intervention of Russia in behalf of Serbia, in order that the latter country might be saved from the fate of Belgium.

Bulgarian troops meanwhile pressed the Serbians on the west and by the end of November it seemed as if the entire territory of Serbia was doomed to the fate of Belgium.

But on the south, allied troops, including a great body of French who had been landed at Saloniki in Greece and made their way northward, disputed the advance of the invaders and at several points drove back the Bulgarians, thus holding the southern territory of Serbia for their ally in the same manner that Flanders was being held by the Allies for Belgium.

The misery of Belgium a year before was as nothing compared with the misery of Poland amid the rigors of winter, and the unhappy country clamored for the help of happier peoples.

The Turkish army numbered 160,000 men and was under the chief command of the German general, Field Marshal von der Goltz, formerly military governor of Belgium.

A wave of indignation swept over the civilized world, already outraged almost beyond endurance by the unprecedented German disregard of international law and the recognized customs of war, when it was announced on November 10 that 30,000 Belgians had been deported into exile by the German authorities in Belgium.

Cardinal Mercier of Belgium protested in the name of humanity, the men being ruthlessly torn from their families, and said the Belgians were being reduced to a state of slavery.

"Our armies have driven the enemy out of the battered villages of France and across the devastated plains of Belgium.

The Entente peace terms enumerated in the reply to the President were: Restoration of Belgium, Serbia and Montenegro, with the payment of indemnities to each by Germany.

" Belgium, in addition to joining with her allies in the reply to the President, sent an individual note, in which the conquered kingdom made a stirring appeal for American sympathy in its purpose to fight on till it won freedom with reparation.

NO LAW" VIIIATROCITIES IXTHE NEUTRALITY OF BELGIUM AND

war! Announcements of mobilization on all sides (Switzerland, Holland, Belgium) doubtless added to the popular belief that Germany desired above all thingspeace.

Yet when the time came to strike, Germany's might was hurled against neutral Belgium and unwilling France, while Russia was left free to overrun the Eastern part of Germany.

Our troops have occupied Luxembourg, perhaps they have already entered Belgium.

Further, that we shall not disturb the integrity and independence of Belgium.

America, the new county, became in 1918 the salvation of starving Belgium, the mainstay of England, the hope of France!

It is a danger for Europe and for Belgium.

The contempt of German imperialists, from Treitschke onward, for the rights of small States, the racial theories which included in "German" territory Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, and the Scandinavian countries, may seem to give colour to this idea.

Nor can a long-prepared policy of annexation in Europe be inferred from the fact that Belgium and France were invaded after the war broke out, or even from the present demand among German parties that the territories occupied should be retained.

On this view, if the Germans win, they are to annex territory east and west: Belgium and half France, say the more violent; the Baltic provinces of Russia, strategic points of advantage, say the more moderate.

In the view we are examining it is proposed, first to kill the greater part of her combatants, next to invade her territory, destroy her towns and villages, and exact (for there are those who demand it) penalties in kind, actual tit for tat, for what Germans have done in Belgium.

CHAPTER XXI FROM THE PEACE OF UTRECHT TO THE INCORPORATION OF BELGIUM WITH THE FRENCH REPUBLIC A.D. 17131795

In her own dominions she was adored; and her name is to this day cherished in Belgium among the dearest recollections of the people.

Disgusted by the despotism exercised by the clergy of Belgium, Joseph commenced his reign by measures that at once roused a desperate spirit of hostility in the priesthood, and soon spread among the bigoted mass of the people, who were wholly subservient to their will.

But ere the deep-sown seeds of bigotry ripened to revolt, or produced the fruit of active resistance in Belgium, Holland had to endure the mortification of another war with England.

in Belgium had a considerable share in the development of free principles, although they at first seemed only to excite the resistance of bigotry and strengthen the growth of superstition.

"Our new nippers are beginning to squeeze to some tune in France and Belgium.

III.Rohan Meets Napoleon As the Grand Army swept into Belgium for the last great battle against the united powers of England, Germany, Austria, and Russia, a strange, savage creature followed ita gaunt, half-naked man, with long yellow hair falling almost to his waist, and bloodshot eyes with a look of madness in them.

THE NATIONAL IDEA IN BELGIUM AND THE PROBLEM OF SMALL NATIONS 5.

Belgium is a living testimony to that great truth.

[Footnote 1: The German official communiquรฉ on August 26, 1914, reports as follows: "All the newspapers in Belgium, with the exception of those in Antwerp, are printed in the German language."

She is fighting, moreover, not only on behalf of the threatened freedom of Belgium, France, and Serbia, on behalf of the unborn freedom of Poland, Alsace-Lorraine, and the subject races of the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires, but also on her own behalf.

A nation, as we have seen, may be composed of several nationalities; but such cases are rare, and are due to peculiar geographical conditions, as for example in Switzerland and Great Britain, or to external pressure, as in Belgium, which have as it were welded together the different racial elements into a single whole.

France could set its house in order; but Belgium, Germany, Italy, Bohemia, Hungary, etc., had as yet no house of their own.

Even before France had herself abolished the monarchy, Belgium threw off the Austrian rule and declared for a republic.

Germany and Italy were put back again into the eighteenth century, Austria's territory in the latter country being largely increased; Norway was unwillingly yoked with Sweden, and Belgium with Holland; Switzerland was made to surrender her democratic constitution and to return to the aristocratic cantonal system of the past; and, lastly, Poland remained dismembered.

The National Idea in Belgium and the Problem of Small Nations.

It is obvious therefore that the attempt of the diplomatists in 1814 to ignore both historical and religious differences and to combine Holland and Belgium into a single State was doomed at the outset.

Fifteen years of constant friction were followed in 1830 by a rising in Brussels against "Dutch supremacy," which quickly spread to the rest of Belgium.

The Great Powers, recognising the inevitable, interfered on behalf of Belgium, she was declared a neutral State, separate from Holland, and took to herself a king in the person of Leopold I. It is, however, highly significant that directly the Dutch menace was removed from Belgium the internal cleavage of nationality began to be felt.

The Great Powers, recognising the inevitable, interfered on behalf of Belgium, she was declared a neutral State, separate from Holland, and took to herself a king in the person of Leopold I. It is, however, highly significant that directly the Dutch menace was removed from Belgium the internal cleavage of nationality began to be felt.

And yet, on the other hand, "the separation of Belgium from Holland had no sooner taken place than the newly aroused national spirit began to show itself among the Flemish-speaking part of the people by a revival of interest in their ancestral Teutonic language....

Germany has, however, postponed this national calamity for generations if not for ever, and the Belgium which arises like a phoenix from the ashes of this third attempt at Teutonification will, we cannot doubt, be a Belgium indissolubly knit together by common memories of a glorious struggle for freedom and cemented by the blood and tears of the whole population.

Germany has, however, postponed this national calamity for generations if not for ever, and the Belgium which arises like a phoenix from the ashes of this third attempt at Teutonification will, we cannot doubt, be a Belgium indissolubly knit together by common memories of a glorious struggle for freedom and cemented by the blood and tears of the whole population.

Germany, like Napoleon a century ago, will call many nations into being; the first and not the least of her creations is a transfigured and united Belgium.

As a frontier State, a link between the Latin and Teutonic races to both of which her peoples are akin, Belgium offers an extremely interesting study of the national idea at work.

It should be noticed further that it has become the practice in recent times to guarantee the neutrality of small frontier States like Belgium which lie at the mercy of their greater neighbours, a practice intended not only to preserve the integrity of such States but also to prevent the frequent occurrence of war by closing, as it were, the military gate between the hostile countries.

Already the northern and southern ends of the frontier between Germany and France are neutralised by the existence of Belgium and Switzerland; why, it may be asked, should not the whole frontier be treated in the same way by neutralising the disputed territory of Alsace-Lorraine?

The results are before us in the ruined cities and starving population of violated Belgium.

Denmark has enriched our educational experience by the establishment of her famous high schools, which we can hardly imagine her doing had she been a province of Prussia; Norway has given us the greatest of modern dramatists, Henrik Ibsen; and Belgium has not only produced Maeterlinck and Verhaeren, but is industrially the most highly developed country on the continent.

Let us now turn to Italy, a country which has in the past been as much of a European Tom Tiddler's ground as Belgium, though for rather different reasons.

[Footnote 2: In addition to these various financial measures, the State has lent Belgium ยฃ10,000,000 and the Union of South Africa ยฃ7,000,000, whilst it has also guaranteed ยฃ5,000,000 of the new Egyptian cotton loan.

But this is not all: France has a foreign trade amounting to ยฃ615,000,000 a year; Belgium's is valued at ยฃ326,000,000, Russia's at ยฃ275,000,000, and Austria-Hungary's at ยฃ256,000,000.

Even apart from the actual destruction due to the war which in some of these towns has been serious, the mere presence of the contending armies will have a more or less paralysing effect on industrial and commercial life in both France and Belgium.

The position in Belgium, however, is much more serious than in France.

In Belgium alone there has been created a whole nation of unemployed.

In Belgium they have come to a complete standstill.

Bad as this is, the condition of affairs is somewhat relieved so far as France and Belgium are concerned by the fact that the seas are open to them, but even then we must add these areas to Germany and Austria-Hungary as regions where industry and trade are at the best severely hampered, regions all of which are important factors in the markets of Europe, and whose commercial paralysis will re-echo through the whole commercial world.

Mr. J.H. Whitehouse, M.P., who visited Belgium says, "The whole life of the nation has been arrested.

On the other hand, though production in France, Belgium and Russia may diminish in many directions, what goods they do produce for export will find no market in Germany and Austria-Hungary and a proportion of them will find their way to this country.

In fact he is in heart a Belgian, and would sacrifice everything to be King of Belgium.

Concession was counselled six weeks ago, on the ground that, after the events in Belgium and in France, collision was dangerous; and this even by bold men.

The French insist on having the conferences respecting the settlement of Belgium at Paris, if there are to be any regular conferences.

The folly of the Prince of Orange will ruin his party in Belgium.

All the Volunteers who are acting in Belgium are French.

He pretends to have the same views as the late Ministry; but it is impossible to suppose the French can resist the offer of Belgium.

At the same time the result of the Conference on the affairs of Belgium is announcednamely, the declaration that there must be an armistice.

England had agreed not to interfere with food supplies, provided the United States saw that they did not fall into German hands in Belgium.

I happened to speak of the marvelous efficiency and preparedness of the German army in Belgium.

Westward, in Belgium and in France, the fight was modern and of the day.

I should add that I did not rob a dead or dying soldier of these trophies, but I was asked not to show them in either Belgium or England, nor to state how I came by them.

I am therefore appending the notes in spite of a rather careful study of the Bryce Report on German atrocities in Belgium.

" This story, along with a few others, I have picked out from hundreds of atrocity tales which I heard during four months spent in England, Belgium, Germany, and Holland.

One of the first atrocity accounts which I heard in Belgium, as well as one of the most persistent, had to do with scores of children whose wrists had been cut by the Kaiser's troops.

Hundreds of them were reported to be in Belgium and Dutch hospitals or in the care of relief committees.

During a month spent in that part of Belgium where the most savage of the atrocities were reported,a month devoted to a diligent search for the truth,I could run down only two instances where the facts were proved, and where taken all in all and looked at from both sides they constituted an atrocity.

The German system of destruction in the early part of the war was utterly without excuse or justification; the wreck and desolation, the hunger and suffering of the larger portion of Belgium are utterly beyond the comprehension of those who have not been there.

A sparrow could not have existed in many parts of Belgium.

In all probability the fact has never been appreciated that during the bombardment of this city,the most important, from a military point of view, in Belgium,the spire of the Notre Dame Cathedral was used as an outlook-station by the Belgian defenders, if not by both Belgians and English.

" Recapitulation The destruction of towns and villages, and the vengeance against inanimate objects shown in the German march through Belgium was barbaric.

The blame for its loss must rest equally between Britain and Belgium, for Belgium, the richest country in Europe for her size, attempted to defend her greatest stronghold with obsolete guns; whilst we, who claim the mastery of the seas, sacrificed the greatest seaport in Europe to the arrangements of an obsolete diplomacy.

The blame for its loss must rest equally between Britain and Belgium, for Belgium, the richest country in Europe for her size, attempted to defend her greatest stronghold with obsolete guns; whilst we, who claim the mastery of the seas, sacrificed the greatest seaport in Europe to the arrangements of an obsolete diplomacy.

Everywhere we met the same gratitude for what England was doing for Belgium; no one ever referred to the sacrifices which Belgium has made for England.

Everywhere we met the same gratitude for what England was doing for Belgium; no one ever referred to the sacrifices which Belgium has made for England.

In Belgium this tendency is counteracted by the natural kindliness of the Belgian, but in other countries patients are often treated with a callousness which is amazing.

The road to Boom is like all the main roads of Belgium.

The Germans may destroy Belgium, but they will never destroy the kingdom of its Queen.

May their honour be great in the hour of Belgium's triumph! XIX.

FurnesThe Town Like so many of the cities of Belgium, Furnes is a town of the past.

In the next three hundred years, however, it must have entirely recovered its position, for in the days of the Spanish Fury it was one of the headquarters of the Inquisition and of the Spanish Army, and there is no town in Belgium upon which the Spanish occupation has left a greater mark.

Perhaps its most beautiful features are the great square tower, the lofty and imposing nave, and the exquisite rose window in the south wall of the transept, which is said to be the finest in Belgium.

Different places of settlement were chosen by different societies; the famous Pickard carried his band into Belgium and Holland; while on the confines of Germany, where the wild provinces of Kirn, Simmerm, and Birkenfield offered a congenial field, the banditti were concentrated, whose last and most celebrated chief, the redoubted Schinderhannes, is the subject of this brief notice.

" Well, we have been in Belgium for two months now, and, as already stated, are getting into our stride again.

But I am not exchanging any of them, thanks!" III Trench-life in Belgium is an entirely different proposition from trench-life in France.

IV The housing question in Belgium confronts us with several novel problems.

The Hun has said in his majesty: "If you will not yield me this, the last city in the last corner of Belgium, I can at least see to it that not one stone thereof remains upon another.

When the War broke out he had been upon the point of proceeding to Edinburgh University, where he had already laid siege to a bursary, and captured the same; but all these plans, together with the plans of countless more distinguished persons, had been swept to the winds by the invasion of Belgium.