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138 examples of  bodley  in sentences

138 examples of bodley in sentences

* * When first the college rolls receive his name, The young enthusiast quits his ease for fame; Through all his veins the fever of renown Spreads from the strong contagion of the gown; O'er Bodley's dome his future labours spread, And Bacon's mansion trembles o'er his head.

I am not the man to decide the limits of civil and ecclesiastical authorityI am plain Eliano Selden, nor Archbishop Usherthough at present in the thick of their books, here in the heart of learning, under the shadow of the mighty Bodley.

Far the best summary of tendencies, on the lines of Bodley's France and Bryce's American Commonwealth.

Dr. Bodley, the surgeon, alone remained seated.

How shall I remember Sir Thomas Bodley, amongst the rest, Otho Nicholson, and the Right Reverend John Williams, Lord Bishop of Lincoln (with many other pious acts), who besides that at St. John's College in Cambridge, that in Westminster, is now likewise in Fieri with a library at Lincoln (a noble precedent for all corporate towns and cities to imitate), O quam te memorem (vir illustrissime) quibus elogiis?

He is her Bodley.

With the exception of some of the work which Mr. Bodley has done at Oxford in recent years, notably the new buildings at Magdalen College, we have never seen modern architecture of greater excellence than these Cirencester houses.

[Footnote 34: We have just learned from Mississippi papers, that the citizens of Vicksburg are erecting a public monument in honor of Dr. H.S. Bodley, who was the ring-leader of the Lynchers in their attack upon the miserable victims.

[Footnote 34: We have just learned from Mississippi papers, that the citizens of Vicksburg are erecting a public monument in honor of Dr. H.S. Bodley, who was the ring-leader of the Lynchers in their attack upon the miserable victims.

BODLEY FAMILY, an American household, father, mother, sisters, and brothers, whose interesting adventures at home and abroad are detailed by Horace E. Scudder in The Bodley Books (1875-1887).

BODLEY FAMILY, an American household, father, mother, sisters, and brothers, whose interesting adventures at home and abroad are detailed by Horace E. Scudder in The Bodley Books (1875-1887).

R116398, 17Aug53, Ina M. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson & G. R. Bodley (A) Modern practical arithmetic, primary, by Ina K. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson, George R. Bodley, and Bruce M. Watson.

R116398, 17Aug53, Ina M. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson & G. R. Bodley (A) Modern practical arithmetic, primary, by Ina K. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson, George R. Bodley, and Bruce M. Watson.

BODLEY HEAD, LTD. SEE Lane (John) The Bodley Head, Ltd. BOLENIUS, EMMA MILLER.

BODLEY HEAD, LTD. SEE Lane (John) The Bodley Head, Ltd. BOLENIUS, EMMA MILLER.

SEE Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key. LANE (JOHN) THE BODLEY HEAD, LTD. Mepe.

[Pub. abroad with woodcuts by Constance Grant] ยฉ 14May26; (pub. abroad 25Mar26, AI-8112); A891478. John Lane, The Bodley Head ltd. (PWH); 11Feb54; R125615.

BODLEY, TEMPLE.

Edith B. Stites, Ellen B. Stuart and Temple Bodley, Jr. (C); 19Nov54; R139405.

BODLEY, TEMPLE, JR. George Rogers Clark, his life and public services.

SEE Bodley, Temple.

LANE (JOHN) THE BODLEY HEAD, LTD. Disraeli.

John Lane, The Bodley Head, Ltd. (PWH); 17Oct55; R157475. MAWHINNEY, MATTHEW H. Practical industrial furnace design.

BODLEY HEAD.

Columbia University Press (PWH); 3Jul72; R531820. BODLEY, R. V. C. The gay deserters.

R. V. C. Bodley (A); 13Nov72; R539777.

By R. V. C. Bodley.

SEE Elliott, Byron K. BODLEY, GEORGE R., joint author.

HAYES, INA M. Modern practical arithmetic, intermediate, by Ina M. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson, George R. Bodley, and Bruce M. Watson.

R116398, 17Aug53, Ina M. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson & G. R. Bodley (A) Modern practical arithmetic, primary, by Ina K. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson, George R. Bodley, and Bruce M. Watson.

R116398, 17Aug53, Ina M. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson & G. R. Bodley (A) Modern practical arithmetic, primary, by Ina K. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson, George R. Bodley, and Bruce M. Watson.

R116396, 17Aug53, Ina M. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson & G. R. Bodley (A)

Modern practical arithmetic, upper grades, by Ina M. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson, George R. Bodley, and Bruce M. Watson.

R116397, 17Aug53, Ina M. Hayes, Charles S. Gibson & G. R. Bodley (A) HAYWARD, HARRISON W., ed.

BODLEY, TEMPLE.

Edith B. Stites, Ellen B. Stuart and Temple Bodley, Jr. (C); 19Nov54; R139405.

BODLEY, TEMPLE, JR. George Rogers Clark, his life and public services.

SEE Bodley, Temple.

BODLEY, R. V. C. Algeria from within.

R. V. C. Bodley (A); 28Feb55; R145186.

LANE (JOHN) THE BODLEY HEAD, LTD. Disraeli.

John Lane, The Bodley Head, Ltd. (PWH); 17Oct55; R157475. MAWHINNEY, MATTHEW H. Practical industrial furnace design.

Bell Telephone Laboratories, Inc. (PWH); 30Sep71; R514491. BODLEY, RONALD V. C. Wind in the Sahara, by R. V. C. Bodley.

Bell Telephone Laboratories, Inc. (PWH); 30Sep71; R514491. BODLEY, RONALD V. C. Wind in the Sahara, by R. V. C. Bodley.

Ronald V. C. Bodley (A); 23Jul71; R509603.

Columbia University Press (PWH); 3Jul72; R531820. BODLEY, R. V. C. The gay deserters.

R. V. C. Bodley (A); 13Nov72; R539777.

SEE Boatright, Mody C. <pb id='024.png' /> BODLEY, R. V. C. The messenger: the life of Mohammed ยฉ 7Mar46; A1856.

I looked about through Napa and Sonoma Counties, and finally came to San Jose, where I purchased the farm I now own, near Hillsdale, of Bodley & McCabe, for which I paid $4,000.

What sort of a poor scholar would he be whose heart did not beat within him when, for the first time, he found himself, to quote the words of 'Elia,' 'in the heart of learning, under the shadow of the mighty Bodley'? Grave questions these!

The name of Thomas Bodley still stands all the world over by the liberal thing he devised.

Little Thomas Bodley opened his eyes in a land distracted with the religious difficulty.

Here the Bodleys remained 'until such time as our Nation was advertised of the death of Queen Mary and the succession of Elizabeth, with the change of religion which caused my father to hasten into England.' In Geneva young Bodley and his brothers enjoyed what now would be called great educational advantages.

On returning to England, Bodley proceeded, not to Exeter College, as by rights he should have done, but to Magdalen, where he became a 'reading man,' and graduated Bachelor of Arts in 1563.

In 1588 Bodley married a wealthy widow, a Mrs. Ball, the daughter of a Bristol man named Carew.

As Bodley survived his wife and had no children, a good bit of her money remains in the Bodleian to this day.

From 1588 to 1596 Bodley was in the diplomatic service, chiefly at The Hague, where he did good work in troublesome times.

On being finally recalled from The Hague, Bodley had to make up his mind whether to pursue a public life.

Bodley determined to escape it, and to make for himself after a very different fashion a name aere perennius.

Bodley proceeds to state the four qualifications he felt himself to possess to do this great bit of work: first, the necessary knowledge of ancient and modern tongues and of 'sundry other sorts of scholastical literature'; second, purse ability; third, a great store of honourable friends; and fourth, leisure.

Bodley's description of the state of the old library as lying in every part ruined and in waste was but too true.

Bodley's real predecessor, the first begetter of a University library, was Thomas Cobham, Bishop of Worcester, who in 1320 prepared a chamber above a vaulted room in the north-east corner of St. Mary's Church for the reception of the books he intended to bestow upon his University.

The librarian of the old Cobham Library had an advantage over Mr. Nicholson, the Bodley librarian of to-day.

Being a clerk in Holy Orders before the time when, in Bodley's own phrase, already quoted, we 'changed' our religion, he was authorized by the University to say masses for the souls of all dead donors of books, whether by gifts inter vivos or by bequest.

The books and manuscripts being thus dispersed or destroyed, a prudent if unromantic Convocation exposed for sale the wooden shelves, desks, and seats of the old library, and so made a complete end of the whole concern, thus making room for Thomas Bodley.

On February 23, 1597/8, Thomas Bodley sat himself down in his London house and addressed to the Vice-Chancellor of his University a certain famous letter: 'SIR, 'Altho' you know me

Bodley's language is somewhat involved, but through it glows the plain intention of an honest man.

From February, 1598, to January, 1613 (when he died), Bodley was happy with as glorious a hobby-horse as ever man rode astride upon.

Though Bodley, in one of his letters, modestly calls himself a mere 'smatterer,' he was, as indeed he had the sense to recognise, excellently well fitted to be a collector of books, being both a good linguist and personally well acquainted with the chief cities of the Continent and with their booksellers.

He was thus able to employ well-selected agents in different parts of Europe to buy books on his account, which it was his pleasure to receive, his rapture to unpack, his pride to despatch in what he calls 'dry-fats'that is, weather-tight cheststo Dr. James, the first Bodley librarian.

Despite growing and painful infirmities (stone, ague, dropsy), Bodley never even for a day dismounted his hobby, but rode it manfully to the last.

The more benefactors there were, the better pleased was Bodley.

Bodley was always on the look-out for gifts and bequests from his store of honourable friends; and in the case of Sir Henry Savile he even relaxed the rule against lending books from the library, because, as he frankly admits to Dr. James, he had hopes (which proved well founded) that Sir Henry would not forget his obligations to the Bodleian.

There it was that the royal pun was made that the founder's name should have been Godly and not Bodley.

Indeed, he was so carried away by the atmosphere of the place as to offer to present to the Bodleian whatever books Sir Thomas Bodley might think fit to lay hands upon in any of the royal libraries, and he kept this royal word so far as to confirm the gift under the Privy Seal.

Authors seem at once to have recognised the importance of the library, and to have made presentation copies of their works, and in 1605 we find Bacon sending a copy of his Advancement of Learning to Bodley, with a letter in which he said: 'You, having built an ark to save learning from deluge, deserve propriety

The most remarkable letter Bodley ever wrote, now extant, is one to Bacon; but it has no reference to the library, only to the Baconian philosophy.

We do not get many glimpses of Bodley's habits of life or ways of thinking, but there is no difficulty in discerning a strenuous, determined, masterful figure, bent during his later years, perhaps tyrannously bent, on effecting his object.

Sir Thomas Bodley died on January 20, 1613, his last days being soothed by a letter he received from the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University condoling his sickness and signifying how much the Heads of Houses, etc., prayed for his recovery.

' Bodley was rather put out in his last illness by the refusal of a Cambridge doctor, Batter, to come to see him, the doctor saying: 'Words cannot cure him, and I can do nothing else for him.'

Bodley's will gave great dissatisfaction to some of his friends, including this aforesaid John Chamberlain, and yet, on reading it through, it is not easy to see any cause for just complaint.

Bodley's brother did not grumble, there were no children, Lady Bodley had died in 1611, and everybody who knew the testator must have known that the library would be (as it was) the great object of his bounty.

Bodley's brother did not grumble, there were no children, Lady Bodley had died in 1611, and everybody who knew the testator must have known that the library would be (as it was) the great object of his bounty.

What annoyed Chamberlain seems to be that, whilst he had (so he says, though I take leave to doubt it) put down Bodley for some trifle in his will, Bodley forgot to mention Chamberlain in his.

What annoyed Chamberlain seems to be that, whilst he had (so he says, though I take leave to doubt it) put down Bodley for some trifle in his will, Bodley forgot to mention Chamberlain in his.

Bodley did no more by his will, which is dated January 2, 1613, and is all in his own handwriting, than he had bound himself to do in his lifetime, and I feel as certain as I can feel about anything that happened nearly 300 years ago, that Mr. Gent, of Gloucester Hall, did owe Bodley money, though, as many another member of the University of Oxford has done with his debts, he forgot all about it.

Bodley did no more by his will, which is dated January 2, 1613, and is all in his own handwriting, than he had bound himself to do in his lifetime, and I feel as certain as I can feel about anything that happened nearly 300 years ago, that Mr. Gent, of Gloucester Hall, did owe Bodley money, though, as many another member of the University of Oxford has done with his debts, he forgot all about it.

The great foundation of Sir Thomas Bodley has, happily for all of us, had better fortune than befell the generous gifts of the Bishops of Durham and Worcester.

Even during the Civil War Bodley's books remained uninjured, at all events by the Parliament men.

Oliver Cromwell, while Lord Protector, presented to the library twenty-two Greek manuscripts he had purchased, and, what is more, when Bodley's librarian refused the Lord Protector's request to allow the Portugal Ambassador to borrow a manuscript, sending instead of the manuscript a copy of the statutes forbidding loans, Oliver commended the prudence of the founder, and subsequently made the donation just mentioned.

The great merchants of the city of London instructed their agents in far lands to be on the look-out for rare things, and transmit them home to find a resting-place in Bodley's buildings.

The foundation of Sir Thomas Bodley, though of no antiquity, shines with unrivalled splendour in the galaxy of Oxford 'Amidst the stars that own another birth.

Bodley drafted with his own hand the first statutes or rules to be observed in his library.

Bodley's rule has proved an expensive one, for the library has been forced to buy at latter-day prices 'baggage-books' it could have got for nothing.

Against lending books Bodley was adamant, and here his rule prevails.

Bodley would not give the divines who were engaged upon a bigger bit of work even than his librarythe translation of the Bible into that matchless English which makes King James's version our greatest literary possessionpermission to borrow 'the one or two books' they wished to see.

Bodley's Library has sheltered through three centuries many queer things besides books and strangely-written manuscripts in old tongues; queerer things even than crocodiles, whales, and mummiesI mean the librarians and sub-librarians, janitors, and servants.

Shade of Sir Thomas Bodley, I invoke thy aid to loosen the purse-strings of the wealthy!

It would be acknowledged by return of post in English and in Latin, and the donor's name would be inscribed, not indeed (and this is a regrettable lapse) in that famous old register which Bodley provided should always be in a prominent place in his library, but in the Annual Statement of Accounts now regularly issued.

Of Bodley's librarian we have heard, and all the lettered world honours the name of Richard Garnett, late keeper of the printed books at the British Museum.