Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
330 examples of  cartilage  in sentences

330 examples of cartilage in sentences

The teeth are much more numerous, although the molars exhibit the zeuglodont double fang; the nasal bones are very short, and the upper surface of the rostrum presents the groove, filled up during life by the prolongation of the ethmoidal cartilage, which is so characteristic of the majority of the Cetacea.

ALTHOUGH NATURALISTS HAVE DIVIDED FISHES into two great tribes, the osseous and the cartilaginous, yet the distinction is not very precise; for the first have a great deal of cartilage, and the second, at any rate, a portion of calcareous matter in their bones.

The chest cartilage, except in an old deer, is soft; the ribs are thin and easily crushed, and the spaces between the ribs are wide enough to admit a man's finger, to say nothing of a wolf's fang.

Even such dense structures as bone, cartilage, and the teeth are formed from cells.

] Some cells live a brief life of 12 to 24 hours, as is probably the case with many of the cells lining the alimentary canal; others may live for years, as do the cells of cartilage and bone.

It is best seen in hyaline cartilage, where it has a glossy appearance.

The cells are called connective-tissue corpuscles, cartilage cells, and bone corpuscles, according to the tissues in which they occur.

Cartilage (Gristle): 1. Hyaline.

2. White Fibro-cartilage.

3. Yellow Fibro-cartilage.

[Illustration: Fig. 8.Fibro-Cartilage Fibers.

(Showing network surrounded cartilage cells.)] 25. Cartilage.

(Showing network surrounded cartilage cells.)] 25. Cartilage.

Cartilage, or gristle, is a tough but highly elastic substance.

Under the microscope cartilage is seen to consist of a matrix, or base, in which nucleated cells abound, either singly or in groups.

It has sometimes a fine ground-glass appearance, when the cartilage is spoken of as hyaline.

This is called white fibro-cartilage, and is found where great strength and a certain amount of rigidity are required.

Again, there is between the cells a meshwork of yellow elastic fibers, and this is called yellow fibro-cartilage (Fig.

The hyaline cartilage forms the early state of most of the bones, and is also a permanent coating for the articular ends of long bones.

The white fibro-cartilage is found in the disks between the bodies of the vertebrรฆ, in the interior of the knee joint, in the wrist and other joints, filling the cavities of the bones, in socket joints, and in the grooves for tendons.

The yellow fibro-cartilage forms the expanded part of the ear, the epiglottis, and other parts of the larynx.

It adheres very closely to the bone, and covers every part except at the joints and where it is protected with cartilage.

Between the vertebrรฆ are pads or cushions of cartilage.

A thin layer of soft putty may be put between the coins to represent the pads of cartilage between the vertebrรฆ.

When covered with cartilage, the ball fits so accurately into its socket that it may be retained by atmospheric pressure alone (sec. 50).

The principal structures which unite in the formation of a joint are: bone, cartilage, synovial membrane, and ligaments.

The joint-end of bones is coated with a thin layer of tough, elastic cartilage.

The bones of the infant, consisting almost wholly of cartilage, are not stiff and hard as in after life, but flexible and elastic.

(Showing its internal structure) A, tendon of the semi-membranosus muscle cut across; B, F, tendon of same muscle; C, internal condyle of femur; D, posterior crucial ligament; E, internal interarticular fibro cartilage; G, bursa under knee-cap; H, ligament of knee-cap; K, fatty mass under knee-cap; L, anterior crucial ligament cut across; P, patella, or knee-cap ]

Nature throws out between and around the broken ends of bones a supply of repair material known as plastic lymph, which is changed to fibrous tissue, then to cartilage, and finally to bone.

The windpipe opens downward from the pharynx, but this communication can be shut off by a little plate or lid of cartilage, the epiglottis.

(Anterior view.) A, hyoid bone; B, thyro-hyoid membrane; C, thyroid cartilage; D, erico-thyroid membrane; E, cricoid cartilage, lateral ligaments seen on each side; F, upper ring of the trachea.

(Anterior view.) A, hyoid bone; B, thyro-hyoid membrane; C, thyroid cartilage; D, erico-thyroid membrane; E, cricoid cartilage, lateral ligaments seen on each side; F, upper ring of the trachea.

The thyroid thus rests upon, and is movable on, the cricoid cartilage.

The cricoid cartilage, so called from its fancied resemblance to a signet-ring, is smaller but thicker and stronger than the thyroid, and forms the lower and back part of the cavity of the larynx.

This cartilage is quite sensitive to pressure from the fingers, and is the cause of the sharp pain felt when we try to swallow a large and hard piece of food not properly chewed.

On the upper edge of the cricoid cartilage are perched a pair of very singular cartilages, pyramidal in shape, called the arytenoid, which are of great importance in the production of the voice.

A, epiglottis; B, thyroid cartilage; C, arytenoid cartilage; D, ligament connecting lower cornu of the thyroid with the back of the cricoid cartilage; E, cricoid cartilage; F, upper ring of the trachea.

A, epiglottis; B, thyroid cartilage; C, arytenoid cartilage; D, ligament connecting lower cornu of the thyroid with the back of the cricoid cartilage; E, cricoid cartilage; F, upper ring of the trachea.

A, epiglottis; B, thyroid cartilage; C, arytenoid cartilage; D, ligament connecting lower cornu of the thyroid with the back of the cricoid cartilage; E, cricoid cartilage; F, upper ring of the trachea.

A, epiglottis; B, thyroid cartilage; C, arytenoid cartilage; D, ligament connecting lower cornu of the thyroid with the back of the cricoid cartilage; E, cricoid cartilage; F, upper ring of the trachea.

(Showing the vocal cords.) A, epiglottis; B, section of hyoid bone; C, superior vocal cord; D, ventricle of the larynx; E, inferior vocal cord; F, section of the thyroid cartilage; H, section of anterior portion of the cricoid cartilage; K, trachea; L, section of the posterior portion of the cricoid cartilage; M, arytenoid cartilage; N, section of the arytenoid muscle.

(Showing the vocal cords.) A, epiglottis; B, section of hyoid bone; C, superior vocal cord; D, ventricle of the larynx; E, inferior vocal cord; F, section of the thyroid cartilage; H, section of anterior portion of the cricoid cartilage; K, trachea; L, section of the posterior portion of the cricoid cartilage; M, arytenoid cartilage; N, section of the arytenoid muscle.

(Showing the vocal cords.) A, epiglottis; B, section of hyoid bone; C, superior vocal cord; D, ventricle of the larynx; E, inferior vocal cord; F, section of the thyroid cartilage; H, section of anterior portion of the cricoid cartilage; K, trachea; L, section of the posterior portion of the cricoid cartilage; M, arytenoid cartilage; N, section of the arytenoid muscle.

(Showing the vocal cords.) A, epiglottis; B, section of hyoid bone; C, superior vocal cord; D, ventricle of the larynx; E, inferior vocal cord; F, section of the thyroid cartilage; H, section of anterior portion of the cricoid cartilage; K, trachea; L, section of the posterior portion of the cricoid cartilage; M, arytenoid cartilage; N, section of the arytenoid muscle.

Muscles which pass from the cricoid cartilage to the outer angle of the arytenoids act to bring the vocal cords close together, and parallel to one another, so that the space between them is narrowed to a slit.

An angular projection of cartilage in the front of the neck.

Chondrin (Gr. chondros, cartilage).

A kind of gelatine obtained by boiling cartilage.

A cartilage of the larynx resembling a seal ring in shape.

A leaf-shaped piece of cartilage which covers the top of the larynx during the act of swallowing.

There is a slight clue to identity in respect of this bone, since the head of it has a small patch of what is called 'eburnation'that is a sort of porcelain-like polish that occurs on the parts of bones that form a joint when the natural covering of cartilage is destroyed by disease.

Some are mere cartilage for a considerable time.

stone, pebble, flint, marble, rock, fossil, crag, crystal, quartz, granite, adamant; bone, cartilage; hardware; heart of oak, block, board, deal board; iron, steel; cast iron, decarbonized iron, wrought iron; nail; brick, concrete; cement.

Tenacity N. {ant. 328} tenacity, toughness, strength; (cohesion) 46; grip, grasp, stickiness, (cohesion) 46; sequacity^; stubbornness &c (obstinacy);; glue, cement, glutinousness^, sequaciousness^, viscidity, (semiliquidity) 352. leather; white leather, whitleather^; gristle, cartilage.

They might either have had friendship, with Carthage, had they honourably kept the peace of 513, or, had they not been disposed for peace, they might long ago have conquered Cartilage: the peace was practically broken by the seizure of Sardinia, and they allowed the power of Carthage to recover itself undisturbed for twenty years.

The cows and buffaloes are guided by a piece of thong, through the cartilage of the nose.

This trunk is composed of a very thick cartilage, and is pliable in every direction.

Both men and women have also a hole through the cartilage of the nose, in which they wear a gold ring, just like that of iron in the noses of our buffalos, which they take out when eating.

Some also had pieces of bone, cord, or beads run through the cartilage of the nose, and all had their faces plentifully smeared with black and red paint.

NOSE AND NOSTRILSThe bridge of the nose should be very wide, with a slight ridge where the cartilage joins the bone.

They have beautiful teeth and fine dark eyes, but generally a large mouth, thick lips, and an ugly nose, the cartilage being slightly crushed when the child is born, so that the nose becomes flat and broad.

Sub-horny Quittor Definition Causes Symptoms and Diagnosis Complications Necrosis of the Lateral Cartilage Pathological Anatomy of the Diseased Cartilage Necrosis of Tendon and of Ligament Ossification of the Cartilage Treatment Operations for Extirpation of the Cartilage C. Ossification of the Lateral Cartilages (Side-bones)

Sub-horny Quittor Definition Causes Symptoms and Diagnosis Complications Necrosis of the Lateral Cartilage Pathological Anatomy of the Diseased Cartilage Necrosis of Tendon and of Ligament Ossification of the Cartilage Treatment Operations for Extirpation of the Cartilage C. Ossification of the Lateral Cartilages (Side-bones)

Sub-horny Quittor Definition Causes Symptoms and Diagnosis Complications Necrosis of the Lateral Cartilage Pathological Anatomy of the Diseased Cartilage Necrosis of Tendon and of Ligament Ossification of the Cartilage Treatment Operations for Extirpation of the Cartilage C. Ossification of the Lateral Cartilages (Side-bones)

Sub-horny Quittor Definition Causes Symptoms and Diagnosis Complications Necrosis of the Lateral Cartilage Pathological Anatomy of the Diseased Cartilage Necrosis of Tendon and of Ligament Ossification of the Cartilage Treatment Operations for Extirpation of the Cartilage C. Ossification of the Lateral Cartilages (Side-bones)

The Lateral Cartilage 17.

Excision of the Lateral Cartilage (Old Method).

Excision of the Lateral Cartilage.

Excision of the Lateral Cartilage.

Partial Excision of the Lateral Cartilage 143.

In the recent state it is covered with fibro-cartilage for the passage of the flexor perforans.

The articulating surface of the os coronรฆ is supplemented by the addition behind of a thick piece of fibro-cartilage (the glenoid) attached inferiorly to the posterior edge of the upper articulatory surface of the os coronรฆ, and superiorly by means of three fibrous slips on each side to the os suffraginis.

The posterior surface of the complementary cartilage forms a gliding surface for the passage of the perforans.

1, Outermost slip from the glenoidal fibro-cartilage; 2, lateral ligament of the first interphalangeal articulation; 3, prolongations of the lateral ligament of the first interphalangeal articulation attached to the end of the navicular bone to form the postero-lateral ligament of the pedal joint; 4, end of the navicular bone; 5, antero-lateral ligament of the pedal joint.]

This is limited in front by the tendon of the extensor pedis, on each side by the lateral ligaments of the joint, and behind by the glenoid fibro-cartilage.

Having reached that position, they send short attachments to the retrossal process of the os pedis and to the inner face of the lateral cartilage.

This latter is often distended, and on account of its close proximity to the seat of operation, is liable to be accidentally opened in excision of the lateral cartilage for quittor.

Continuing its course, it passes between the bifurcating portions of the extremity of the perforatus, glides over the smooth posterior surface of the supplementary glenoid cartilage of the articulation of the first and second phalanges, plays over the inferior surface of the navicular bone, and finally becomes inserted into the semilunar crest of the os pedis.

At the Superior Border of the Lateral Cartilage, the Artery of the Plantar Cushion.

This is directed obliquely downwards and backwards, under cover of the cartilage, and is distributed to the middle portion of the complementary apparatus of the os pedis, as well as to the villous tissue and the coronet.

Under the Lateral Cartilage two transverse branches, an anterior and a posterior, to form the Coronary Circle.

The superficial layer is distributed over the external face of the cartilage, forming thereon a dense network, and finally converges towards the superior limit of the plexus to form ten or twelve principal branches, which again unite to form two large vessels.

THE LATERAL CARTILAGES.Each is a flattened plate of cartilage, possessing two faces and four borders separated by four angles.

Below and behind, the internal face of the cartilage is united to the plantar cushion.

16.EXTERNAL FACE OF THE OUTER LATERAL CARTILAGE.

The movement of the plantar cushion will now be downwards as well as backwards; and, seeing that it is attached to the inner aspect of each lateral cartilage, we shall expect these latter, by the downward movement of the plantar cushion, to be drawn inwards.

The portion covering the hyaline cartilage of the navicular bone has lost its peculiar pearl-blue shimmer, and become a dirty yellow.

2. Changes in the Cartilage.

Directly that portion of the bursal membrane covering the cartilage is the subject of inflammatory change, the cartilage itself, by reason of its low vitality, soon suffers.

Instead of carrying a bit in their mouths, the reins are attached to a little piece of iron that passes through a hole in the cartilage of the nose, and the traces which draw the load spring from a collar that resembles a yoke.

It was Buonarroti's habit to banter all who were drawing there; and one day, when he was annoying me, I got more angry than usual, and, clenching my fist, I gave him such a blow on the nose that I felt bone and cartilage go down like biscuit beneath my knuckles; and this mark of mine he will carry with him to the grave."

The forehead, seen in front, is square; the nose, a little flattenednot by nature, but because, when he was a young boy, Torrigiano de' Torrigiani, a brutal and insolent fellow, smashed in the cartilage with his fist.

Tracing it upwards, I found it to be constituted by a prolongation of the ensiform cartilage of the sternum, or extremity of the breast-bone.

This joint has a motion upwards and downwards, and also a lateral motionthe latter operating in such a way, that when the boys turn in either direction, the edges of the cartilage are found to open and shut.

The form of the animal is preserved by an entire cartilaginous case, of about three inches in thickness, covered by a kind of shagreen skin, so amalgamated with the cartilage as not to be separated from it.

The interior cavity, containing the vital parts, terminates a little behind the large fins, where the cartilage was solid, to its tapered extremity, which is without a caudal fin.

As it was, it narrowly escaped a fracture and, for several weeks afterward, it felt as if powdered glass had been substituted for cartilage between the vertebrae.

The diaphragm is a sheet of muscle and tendon, convex on its upper side, and attached by bands of striped muscle to the lower ribs at the side, to the sternum, and to the cartilage of the ribs which join it in front, and at the back by very strong bands to the lumbar vertebrae.

Like most others on that coast, they had apiece of bamboo, eighteen inches long, run through the cartilage of the nose.