Inspirassion

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166 examples of  catered  in sentences

166 examples of catered in sentences

And although we sit on a modest roof, the shopkeepers cater to us.

" "I don't say nothing how her mother treats Vetsburg, her oldest boarder, and for what he pays for that second floor front and no lunches she can afford to cater a little; but that such a girl shouldn't be made to take up a little stenography or help with the housework!

Cater-traya hundred Guineasoh, damn the Dice'tis minecome, a full GlassDamnation to my Uncle.

Cater TrayPox of the Dice Sir Cau.

cater = quatre.

Although the shop was an unpretentious one, and catered mainly for the ha'p'orths of the juvenile patrons of the picture house next door, it was called "The Camden Town Confectionery Emporium," and the title was printed over the little shop in large letters.

For large establishments, such as some of the immense London warehouses, where a large number of young men have to be catered for daily, it may be well adapted, as it is just possible that a slight increase in the supply of gas necessary for a couple of joints, may serve equally to cook a dozen dishes.

The bears are the working people of the show, and the big grizzlies are the walking delegates who control the amalgamated association of working bears, and the occupants of the other cages have got to cater to Uncle Ephraim, the walking delegate, or be placed on the unfair list and slugged.

Strange pleasures Do we poor mortals cater for ourselves!

The savage monarch then proceeded to ratify and augment the agreement into which he had already catered with Edward Winslow, and promised to guarantee to the English settlers an exclusive trade with his tribe; at the same time entreating them to prevent his powerful enemies, the Narragansetts, from carrying on a commercial intercourse with the French colonists.

There is nothing left for him but to cater to the minority of careerists, the one-eighth of the electorate representing superior intelligence.

The plain truth is, the man malingered shamelessly and even took a certain pride in the low cunning which enabled him to pose on as the impatient patient when he was so very well content to take his ease, be waited on and catered to, and listen for the footsteps of Eve de Montalais and the accents of her delightful voice.

I will make you so comfortable: you must let me cater for youcook for you.'

He was too listless even to cater for his daily bread by writing his articles for the magazines.

"It isn't necessary to cater to children; they'll go anyhow, whatever is shown.

The Ministry of Munitions, In order to cater for the spiritual needs of the new population at Gretna, has simultaneously provided sites for the Church of Scotland, the Church of England, the Roman Catholics and the Congregationalists.

If anything her depression grew more perversely morbid the more she was catered to, courted, flattered, and cajoled.

Only then we find a delight in the description of the city for which the wagons cater the divine barley, and the water is carried by the girls, "with amphorae poised on their shoulders and lifted hands, going home, light and graceful, like immortal nymphs.

Here she is, ware wing, Cater, ware wing, avaunt. LIN.

Shakespeare's successors catered to the depraved tastes of this new audience.

In Macpherson we have an unusual figure, who catered to the new romantic interest in the old epic heroes, and won immense though momentary fame, by a series of literary forgeries.

This necessity often forced him against his own better judgment to cater to the perverted taste of the Restoration.

They cater, and cater well, for the ordinary Vegetarian, but with a little care in the selection of the menu, abstainers from salt, fermented bread, etc., can also obtain a satisfactory meal.

They cater, and cater well, for the ordinary Vegetarian, but with a little care in the selection of the menu, abstainers from salt, fermented bread, etc., can also obtain a satisfactory meal.

Cater-trey[208]?

supply, suppeditate^; furnish; find, find one in; arm. cater, victual, provision, purvey, forage; beat up for; stock, stock with; make good, replenish; fill, fill up; recruit, feed. have in store, have in reserve; keep, keep by one, keep on foot, keep on hand; have to fall back upon; store &c 636; provide against a rainy day &c (economy) 817.

The collection was enlarged by addition under separate title-page of "A Cater-Character, thrown out of a box by an Experienced Gamester"-which gave Characters of an Apparitor, a Painter, a Pedlar, and a Piper.

As the days wore by, the embargo placed upon our desire to cater for the invalids was gradually lifted, and little things such as sponge biscuits and pears crept in to vary the monotony of the milk diet.

At last the summit is reached, and, disembarking, the tourists can seek refreshments in the hotel, which will cater to their wants, and then spend the time before the train returns in enjoying the view, and in rambling over the seventy acres of broken granite which form the summit.

"[5a] "As long as Atalantis shall be read," some readers were sure to find little to their taste in the curious information contained in the first biography of Campbell, but Mrs. Haywood was not reluctant to gratify an appetite for scandal when she could profitably cater to it.

I grant this is no Fryday and I at this tyme no cater for the fishmarkett.

We cater to a little bigger class of tradeone of the many twists of the business," was the answer.

I am well aware that ladies are catered for very badly at most of the tournaments in regard to changing-room accommodation.

This is a somewhat risky determination as there is great competition among the various centres and business firms which cater for Ski-runners.

However, the Toy Bulldog Club then started, took the dogs vigorously in hand, and thanks to unceasing efforts, Toy Bulldogs have always since been catered for at an ever increasing number of shows.

Beginning with fresh cow's milk for a week, their diet may be gradually increased to Mellin's or Benger's food, and later to gruel and Quaker Oats, their steadily increasing appetites being catered for by the simple exercise of commonsense.

Biscuits, Rodnim, Flako, meat, vegetables, paunches, and sheep's heads, with an occasional big bone to gnaw, provide unlimited change, and the particular tastes of individuals should be learned and catered for.

Other clubs have been started in the north and elsewhere, and altogether the Airedale is very well catered for in this respect, and, if things go on as they are now going, is bound to prosper and become even more extensively owned than he is at present.

Several nights later Mike and I were seated at a table in Crazy Horse, a topless bar that catered to Marines.

Families catered for at a distance.

Consequently both parties must alike cater to that balance of political power.

From fire to fire, we'll saunter at our leisure, The gallant you, I'll cater for your pleasure.

Though Mrs. Midas shows a righteous zeal In preaching self-control at every meal, She never in her stately home forgets To cater freely for her precious pets.

The match-lock and the field-piece in their rudest form triumphed over the shield, the spear, and the javelin, while the long-bow, once so formidable, is now rarely drawn, except by those who cater for sensation-journals.

It was a sickening transaction but it relieved his mind considerably and catered in a measure to that incorrigible hope within him.

And besides, as at Lydford, for much of the day, she was absorbed in the material details of her life, being rubbed and dressed and undressed, and adorned and fed and catered to.

Why sleeps the Muse?is there no room for praise, When such bright constellations blaze? When sage Newcastle, abstinently great, Neglects his food to cater for the state; And Grafton, towering Atlas of the throne, So well rewards a genius like his own: Granville and Bath illustrious, need I name, For sober dignity, and spotless fame; 20

The highest type of patronage was to be catered to.

XI THE THREE OF THEM For eleven years Martha Foote, head housekeeper at the Senate Hotel, Chicago, had catered, unseen, and ministered, unknown, to that great, careless, shifting, conglomerate mass known as the Travelling Public.

Chideock is a clean pleasant street of houses most of whose occupants let lodgings or cater for the passing traveller in one way or another.

In every Number it has been our endeavour to cater for his "amusement and instruction," so as to combine interest and noveltyor, in a homely phrase, to make each sheet like "the punch of conversation."

The trance of possession seemed, with her, to be a form of dissipation, in which she indulged as she might have catered for a baser appetite.

"I keep every article that man, woman, or child can want for their use, for their homes, their work or their play; but food and drink I will not cater for.

Tarun Bharat also ushered in winds of change in the Goan media with supplements and booklets to cater to popular tastes.

It was for this section that the Konkan Mail would cater to.

Some of these days a fine man going to find you and then, erer, lady, let me cater for the wedding?" Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person interviewed:

Master "I belonged to a man named Thomas Johnson Cater.

We must cater to individual tastes.

"Taste was never made to cater for vanity.

"Taste was never made to cater for vanity.

Artists visiting this town will find their requirements in Artists' Materials well catered for.

We thought that, when you wished to cater For China's spiritual good, This name received your imprimatur; "Go forth," you said, "my sons! Go and behave exactly like the Huns!"

If this vexatious restriction were removed it is possible, if it is not certain, that while some halls remained faithful to comic songs and jugglers others would gradually learn to cater for more intellectual and subtle audiences, and that out of obscurity and disorder new dramatic forms, coloured and permeated by the thought and feeling of to-day, might be definitely evolved.

The directress of the hospital sent her own cook from her chateau to cater for Mr. Atkins.

However, if I can come over here again before the time when certain cater-pillars change into chrysalies, I shall assuredly try to make use of his ability and dexterity.

For a price we cater to themeven as their tailors, and milliners, and barbers.

Nor could the sense of smell have been much better catered to than that of hearing, owing to the "singeing of pigs and burnt crackling of over-roasted pork."

He knew admirably how to cater to the prejudices of the masses.

But as long as "the fool multitude that choose by show" give more attention to the size of an advertisement than to the merits of the security that it offers, the profits of those who cater for its weaknesses will wax fat.

By Harold Dean Cater.

Harold Dean Cater (A); 1Aug74; R582631.

By Harold Dean Cater.

Harold Dean Cater (A); 1Aug74; R582631.

Saint-Jean-de-Luz had a population of ten thousand two centuries ago; to-day it has three thousand, and most of these take in boarders, or in one way or another cater to the hordes of visitors who have made itor would, if they could have supprest its quiet Basque charm of coloring and charactera little Brighton.

Separate coaches are provided on railway trains, hotels, restaurants, theaters and other places of amusement, which cater to white customers, do not permit negro patrons.

A man seeking to become a son-in-law is bound to cater (yรฉ-lin) or make presents to the family, which is to say, he will come along some day with a deer on his shoulder, perhaps fling it off on the ground before the wigwam, and go his way without a single word being spoken.

Besides, we would not cater to any of these contemptible prejudices against color."

You felt that the necessity to cater to the ideas and wishes of inferior minds, in representing a character on the stage, would be one of the hardest phases of stage life to meet.

The language of the poultry magazines, by the way, is equally sentimental and efflorescent with that of the speeches at agricultural fairs, sufficiently so to sicken one who has once accepted it as reliable, as for instance: "The individual must be very abnormal in his tastes if they can not be catered to by our feathered tribe."

It was a little thing, after all, I told myself sharply, to subordinate my individuality and cater to her whims.

I had a shrewd notion that a person who would cater to every whim of my husband's mother would be little better than a slave.

I was careful to cater to my mother-in-law's wishes in every way I could.

A third story shows by its obvious happy ending that the author has catered to magazine needs or what he conceives to be editorial policies.

"] I did not ask for it; I never yearned Within the Royal Court to board and bed; Like all the other honours I have earned, I had this greatness thrust upon my head; But if the Precincts are to be my lair Then for my comfort Ministers must cater; I want a second bath inserted there, Also an elevator.

"Now-a-days, on the contrary, what our ancestors called hen-houses are known as ornithones, and serve to house thrushes and pea-cocks to cater to the delicate appetite of the master: and indeed such structures now have larger roofs than formerly sufficed to cover an entire farm house.

[Illustration: THE SERVANT GIRL AND THE EMPLOYMENT AGENCY] Not all employment agencies cater to this trade.

Matthew had studied them, like a skilful strategist, catered to them, and felt quite sure that he had that revered individual on his side.

It was offered to the nation; and by those whose business it was to cater for the nation, pronounced a copy.

Many people are desiring it, and religion doesn't cater for it, nor does duty cater for it.

Many people are desiring it, and religion doesn't cater for it, nor does duty cater for it.

If this vexatious restriction were removed it is possible, if it is not certain, that while some halls remained faithful to comic songs and jugglers others would gradually learn to cater for more intellectual and subtle audiences, and that out of obscurity and disorder new dramatic forms, coloured and permeated by the thought and feeling of to-day, might be definitely evolved.

Chaucer's Cook was a personage of unusually wide experience, having, in his capacity as the keeper of an eating-house, to cater for so many customers of varying tastes and resources.

When one remembers that there is also Who's the Lady? running under distinguished episcopal patronage, the modern curate cannot complain that he is not well catered for.

Sir,I think you would do well to cater more for womenwho, after all, are a rising sex.

His church tapers were made of real wax, procured from a special house which catered exclusively to houses of worship, for Des Esseintes professed a sincere repugnance to gas, oil and ordinary candles, to all modern forms of illumination, so gaudy and brutal.

Such be also cal'd bard Cater treas, because commonly, the longer end will of his owne sway drawe downewards, and turne vp to the eie, Sixe, Sincke, Deuce or Ace.

To helpe this, there must be for that purpose, an odd Die, called a flat Cater trea ready at hand, and no other number, for graunting the trea and Cater be allwaies vppon the one Die, then is there no chance vpon the other Die, but may serue to make fiue or nine, & cast forth, & loose all.

To helpe this, there must be for that purpose, an odd Die, called a flat Cater trea ready at hand, and no other number, for graunting the trea and Cater be allwaies vppon the one Die, then is there no chance vpon the other Die, but may serue to make fiue or nine, & cast forth, & loose all.

There are many varieties of this plant cultivated in flower gardens on account of the curious shapes of the seed-pods, some having a distant resemblance to snails' horns, cater-pillars, &c. under which names they are sold in the seed-shops.

Although nominally catered to and fawned upon by the German authorities, the American correspondents cut on the whole a humiliating figure, although not all of them realise it.