Inspirassion

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2690 examples of  coin  in sentences

2690 examples of coin in sentences

Is he to be burdened with new expenses lest he should hoard up the publick money, stop the circulation of coin, and turn broker or usurer with twopence a-day? I have been so long acquainted, sir, with the soldier's character, that I will adventure to secure him from the charge of avarice, and to promise that whatever he shall possess not necessary to life, he will enjoy to the advantage of his landlord.

Then putting a small piece of paper in the hand of Donna Florinda, he turned his own swarthy palm, in which a small silver coin glittered, to the moon, and vanished.

The competition, plus the coin, ensnared me.

" "Bring me two thousand dollars, gold coin o' the United States, no foolin', an' I'll give ye Mandy.

But when I tendered him the coin, he went back on me.

"He wouldn't take the coin," continued Nal, "he said I'd robbed him of it, an' so I had.

It might be said of him, as of Midas in the fable, that whatever he touched with his finger immediately glistened, and grew yellow, and was changed at once into sterling metal, or, which suited him still better, into piles of coin.

How much do you consider him good for?" Piers pulled a coin impetuously from his pocket and slapped it down on the table in front of Gracie.

" Gracie stared at the coin with widening eyes, not offering to touch it.

With a sudden dive he seized the coin and without ceremony swept Gracie's hair from her shoulders and dropped it down the back of her neck.

In contrast with these excellent qualities the reader will probably note the strange appearance of his lines due to his fondness for obsolete words, like eyne (eyes) and shend (shame), and his tendency to coin others, like mercify, to suit his own purposes.

When he passed poor homeless Arabs sleeping in the streets he would slip a coin into their hands, in order that they might have a happy awakening; for he himself knew well what it meant to be hungry.

For as the money-changer (banker) is not allowed to reject Cรฆsar's coin, nor the seller of herbs, but if you show the coin, whether he chooses or not, he must give up what is sold for the coin; so it is also in the matter of the soul.

For as the money-changer (banker) is not allowed to reject Cรฆsar's coin, nor the seller of herbs, but if you show the coin, whether he chooses or not, he must give up what is sold for the coin; so it is also in the matter of the soul.

For as the money-changer (banker) is not allowed to reject Cรฆsar's coin, nor the seller of herbs, but if you show the coin, whether he chooses or not, he must give up what is sold for the coin; so it is also in the matter of the soul.

But the soul will never reject the manifest appearance of the good, any more than persons will reject Cรฆsar's coin.

"RUSKIN," said Slip, "decrees that not only should one give to beggars, but that one should give kindly and deliberately and not as though the coin were red-hot.

cuarto: A copper coin, one hundred and sixty of which were equal in value to a silver peso.

peso: A silver coin, either the Spanish peso or the Mexican dollar, about the size of an American dollar and of approximately half its value.

V. retaliate, retort, turn upon; pay, pay off, pay back; pay in one's own coin, pay in the same coin; cap; reciprocate &c 148; turn the tables upon, return the compliment; give a quid pro quo &c n., give as much as one takes, give as good as one gets; give and take, exchange fisticuffs; be quits, be even with; pay off old scores. serve one right, be hoist on one's own petard, throw a stone in one's own garden, catch a Tartar.

V. retaliate, retort, turn upon; pay, pay off, pay back; pay in one's own coin, pay in the same coin; cap; reciprocate &c 148; turn the tables upon, return the compliment; give a quid pro quo &c n., give as much as one takes, give as good as one gets; give and take, exchange fisticuffs; be quits, be even with; pay off old scores. serve one right, be hoist on one's own petard, throw a stone in one's own garden, catch a Tartar.

money-like instruments, M1, M2, sum, amount; balance, balance sheet; sum total; proceeds &c (receipts) 810. currency, circulating medium, specie, coin, piece

[Fr.], hard cash, cold cash; dollar, sterling coin; pounds shillings and pence; Ls.d.

petty cash, pocket money, change, small change, small coin, doit^, stiver^, rap, mite, farthing, sou, penny, shilling, tester, groat, guinea; rouleau^; wampum; good sum, round sum, lump sum; power of money, plum, lac of rupees.

major coin, crown; minor coin. monetarist, monetary theory.

major coin, crown; minor coin. monetarist, monetary theory.

[Science of coins] numismatics, chrysology^. [coin scholar or collector] numismatist. paper money, greenback; major denomination, minor denomination; money order, postal money order, Post Office order; bank note; bond; bill, bill of exchange; order, warrant, coupon, debenture, exchequer bill, assignat^; blueback

false money, bad money; base coin, flash note, slip^, kite [Slang]; fancy stocks; Bank of Elegance.

[manufacture currency] mint (coins), coin; print (paper currency).

That which is understood excels that which is spoken in quantity and quality alike; ideas thus figured and personified, change hands, as we may say, like coin; and the speakers imply without effort the most obscure and intricate thoughts.

" Be not ashamed of thy birth then, thou art a gentleman all the world over, and shalt be honoured, when as he, strip him of his fine clothes, dispossess him of his wealth, is a funge (which Polynices in his banishment found true by experience, gentry was not esteemed) like a piece of coin in another country, that no man will take, and shall be contemned.

Spread out by me, the roving coin Thy nets may catch, but not confine; Nor can I hope thy silken chain

And everyone who succeeded in picking up a coin ran off to the nest with the utmost speed to conceal it.

Under the name of รฉpices, the magistrates, judges, reporters, and counsel, who had at first only received sweetmeats and preserves as voluntary offerings, eventually exacted substantial tribute in current coin.

And at that he seemed to himself to be hunting for a coin with which to tip her.

They must think and act for themselves, and for once it is the men and women that we see, and not the mere symbols which pass as coin in a world at peace.

How the vague sense of Roman dominion is deepened as we trace the outline of a camp, the massive ranges of a theatre, or the mouldy effigy on a coin, in some region far distant from the Imperial centre,as at Nismes or Chester!

2. The interest on these bonds was made payable "in coin."

This made it possible to pay the principal of the 5-20 bonds in greenbacks instead of coin.

Fearing that payment of the principal in greenbacks might have a bad effect on future loans, Congress, when it passed the next act (March 3, 1863) for borrowing money, provided that both principal and interest should be paid in coin.

At that time and long after the war "coin" commanded a premium; that is, it took more than 100 cents in paper money to buy 100 cents in gold.

Anybody who owned a bond could therefore sell the coin he received as interest for paper and so increase the rate of interest measured in paper money.

The Republicans nominated Grant and Schuyler Colfax and declared for the payment of all bonds in coin; for a reduction of the national debt and the rate of interest; and for the encouragement of immigration.

Surplus revenue might be used and bonds issued for the purchase of coin.

The "Credit Strengthening Act," declaring that 5-20 bonds of the United States should be paid "in coin.

In this refunding, the 5-20's, whose principal was payable in greenbacks, were replaced by others whose principal was payable "in coin.

" 3. (1873) The act of 1873, by stopping the coinage of silver dollars, and taking away the legal tender quality of those in circulation, made the words "in coin" mean gold.

Under this, the Secretary of the Treasury was to buy not less than $2,000,000, nor more than $4,000,000, worth of silver bullion each month, and coin it into dollars.

The payment of the bonds brought up the question, Shall the 5-20's be paid in coin or greenbacks? 5.

The Democrats in 1868 insisted that the bonds should be redeemed in greenbacks; the Republicans that they should be paid in coin,and when they won, they passed the "Credit Strengthening Act" of 1869, and in 1870 refunded the bonds at lower rates.

In the process of refunding, the 5-20's, whose principal was payable in greenbacks, were replaced by others payable "in coin."

The words "in coin" therefore meant "in gold.

The silver purchased under the law of 1890 was paid for with notes exchangeable for "coin"; but as the secretaries always construed "coin" to mean gold, and as by 1893 these notes amounted to $150,000,000, our gold obligationsthat is, notes exchangeable for goldwere nearly $500,000,000 (greenbacks, $346,000,000; silver purchase notes, $150,000,000).

The silver purchased under the law of 1890 was paid for with notes exchangeable for "coin"; but as the secretaries always construed "coin" to mean gold, and as by 1893 these notes amounted to $150,000,000, our gold obligationsthat is, notes exchangeable for goldwere nearly $500,000,000 (greenbacks, $346,000,000; silver purchase notes, $150,000,000).

And none of the guests noted that the almost continuous stream of small coin flowing to the Gumble till came now but from one pocket of the host.

Her Coin (while Nassau fought) debas'd and rude, By Thee in Beauty and in Truth renew'd, An Arduous Work!

77. 'Sit still, and hear, those whom proud thoughts do swell, Those that look pale by loving coin too well; Whom luxury corrupts.' (Creech).

Hence to Quoin Point (Coin-de-Mire) the coast has no sinuosities.

To imagine that because a coin bears Cรฆsar's head, therefore it is Cรฆsar's property, and that he may demand to have as many of such coins as he chooses paid over to him, is puerile, and notoriously false.

The circulation of foreign coin of every kind was as common in the Mediterranean then as now; and everybody knew that the coin was the property of the holder, not of him whose head it bore.

The circulation of foreign coin of every kind was as common in the Mediterranean then as now; and everybody knew that the coin was the property of the holder, not of him whose head it bore.

I directed Mohammed to reward his services with a piastre, a small silver coin of the value of 2-1/2d.; and never, perhaps, did so trifling a sum of money produce so great an effect.

We had provided ourselves with paras, a small copper coin, for the purpose of giving alms to the miserable beings who solicited our charity, and the poor creatures always went away well satisfied with the trifling gift bestowed upon them.

I couldn't smile like thatI'd be crying my eyes out" Dicky left me at the door of the dressing room, pressing a coin slyly into my hand.

A handkerchief, a small coin purse, two or three bills of small denominations, an envelope with a tiny powder puffthese were all.

"Here's for miggles," and Miss Mattie caught the sparkle of a coin as it flew into the grimy fists of Eddie.

" He dressed himself accordingly, and, taking his gathered coin from its hiding-place, wrapped every piece separately in a bit of rag, slid it into his deep pocket, and sewed the pocket up.

But he sold his groceries chiefly to loose girls who paid him in their coin, which, although it answered his purpose, would neither buy him goods or pay his rent, and he found his stock rapidly dwindling away without his receiving any cash to replenish it.

Leave all your money in bills behind; coin will not be bad to take; here are a few Confederate notes for you.

Coin (see Money) Coinage, debasement of, forbidden.

Mormon Gold Coin.

The proprietor, Mr. Crow, gave me my dinner which I accepted with many thanks, for it saved my coin to pay for the next meal.

Is it indeed true speaking, as I have heard, that the Caliph el Walid the First, in Hegira 88, sent to Mecca an immense present of gold and silver, forty camel-loads of small cut gems and a hundred thousand miskals in gold coin?"

Then you'll see which way the coin spins!" "Which way will it spin?" demanded Ruyven, incredulous yet eager.

"I have just consulted Sir George, and he says that neither I nor Ruyven have won, seeing that Ruyven used the coin he did" "Very well," cried Ruyven, triumphantly.

And yet, sir, it is hard to be trampled into a felon's grave, loaded with the maledictions of those whom you would coin your heart to serve and bless!

All bless him as he passesbless him louder when Nobili, all aglow with happiness, empties his pockets of all the coin he has, and promises more to-morrow.

Something intensely white, something so small that it was scarcely larger than the silver coin in his hand, was appearing in a slight cleft of the range.

The weight of each castellano, a Castilian coin, is called a peso, and the entire sum, therefore, amounted to fifteen thousand castellanos.

The castellano is a coin somewhat inferior to one thirtieth of a pound, but its value exceeds that of a golden ducat.

This coin is peculiar to Castile, and is not minted in any other province.

He was like one who reaches in his pocket for a copper coin and brings out a handful of gold-pieces.

I ain't rollin' in coin the way you are, Mac.

Taking a coin from his pocket, the Englishman said: "My great-great-grandfather was made a lord by the king whose picture you see on this shilling.

" "Indeed!" replied the governor, smiling, as he produced another coin.

The simple-looking youngster took the coin, licked it, dropped it in his pocket and slowly walked away whistling.

then, memory is treacherous; the morning air is pregnant with food for the imagination!" "Which is not a coin to satisfy a creditor, my Lord," said the caustic Myndert.

It is money, sir, money," he continued, unconsciously rattling the coin in his breeches pocket, "that settles every question at the present day, and our money will bring these beggarly rebels to their senses.

The Mexican interior transit duties should also be abolished, and also their internal Government duty on coin and bullion.

The prohibition of exports and the duties upon exports should be annulled, and especially the heavy export duty on coin and bullion, so as to cheapen and facilitate the purchase of imports and permit the precious metals, untaxed, to flow out freely from Mexico into general circulation.

It is recommended that the duties herein suggested shall be collected exclusively in gold or silver coin.

This has consisted chiefly in converting the coins of foreign countries into American coin.

The largest amount of foreign coin imported has been received at New York, and if a branch mint were established at that city all the foreign coin received at that port could at once be converted into our own coin without the expense, risk, and delay of transporting it to the Mint for that purpose, and the amount recoined would be much larger.

The largest amount of foreign coin imported has been received at New York, and if a branch mint were established at that city all the foreign coin received at that port could at once be converted into our own coin without the expense, risk, and delay of transporting it to the Mint for that purpose, and the amount recoined would be much larger.

The largest amount of foreign coin imported has been received at New York, and if a branch mint were established at that city all the foreign coin received at that port could at once be converted into our own coin without the expense, risk, and delay of transporting it to the Mint for that purpose, and the amount recoined would be much larger.

Experience has proved that foreign coin, and especially foreign gold coin, will not circulate extensively as a currency among the people.

The important measure of extending our specie circulation, both of gold and silver, and of diffusing it among the people can only be effected by converting such foreign coin into American coin.

The important measure of extending our specie circulation, both of gold and silver, and of diffusing it among the people can only be effected by converting such foreign coin into American coin.

A branch mint of the United States at the great commercial depot on the west coast would convert into our own coin not only the gold derived from our own rich mines, but also the bullion and specie which our commerce may bring from the whole west coast of Central and South America.

By rendering their use permanent, to the moderate extent already mentioned, by offering no inducement for their return and by exchanging them for coin and other values, they will constitute to a certain extent the general currency so much needed to maintain the internal trade of the country.