Inspirassion

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109 examples of  demoralising  in sentences

109 examples of demoralising in sentences

Gordon had only about 3000 men, chiefly Chinese; and, notwithstanding the fact that when he took over the force it had just been demoralised by defeat, he soon proved himself more than a match for the rebel hordes.

The Turkish forces were disorganised by heavy and repeated defeats, the men demoralised and not in good condition, and there was no hope for them that they could receive sufficient reinforcements to enable them to stave off the ultimate capture of Bethlehem and Jerusalem, though as events proved they could still put up a stout defence.

The British troops whom Von Kluck supposed to be exhausted and demoralised, were in truth nothing of the sort.

Seven of the detachment on this gun were hit, not all at once but, what is apt to be much more demoralising, at intervals of a few minutes.

If we had raised their income beyond that of the labouring man in ordinary times, we should have gone far to destroy the most valuable feeling of the manufacturing populationnamely, that of honest self-reliance, and we should have done our best, to a great extent, to demoralise a large portion of the population, and induce them to prefer the wages of charitable relief to the return of honest industry.

He was demoralised, as surely, if not as deeply, as his own labourers, by the old Poor Law.

It is demoralising both for Government and the governed that a hundred thousand pilgrims should dictate terms to a nation composed of three hundred millions.

I do not know that I carried much away with me, except the general impression, that our trade is carried on on principles which are dishonest as regards the Chinese, and demoralising to our own people.

The Revolution weakened and demoralised the French army and disorganised the navy, which it deprived of almost all its experienced officers.

Then he lashed his perspiring jades afresh, but indifferent to their jolting, running up against things here and there, not caring if he did, demoralised, and almost weeping with thirst, fatigue, and depression.

Now irresponsibility is demoralising to any administration, however democratic be the principles upon which its officials are selected.

The coaling system is, no doubt, demoralising in itself, as it enables Negroes of the lowest class to earn enough in one day to keep them in idleness, even in luxury, for a week or more, till the arrival of the next steamer.

He was demoralised by the peril, and the physical coward came uppermost.

But to consider a people whose ideas have determined the religion of half the world, and that the more cultivated half, and who made the most eminent struggle against the power of Rome, as a purely exceptional race, is a demoralising offence against rational knowledge, a stultifying inconsistency in historical interpretation.

Thenceforth the virtuous elements of the Jewish life were engaged, as they had been with varying aspects during the long and changeful prophetic period and the restoration under Ezra, on the side of preserving the specific national character against a demoralising fusion with that of foreigners whose religion and ritual were idolatrous and often obscene.

It is very evident that these cock-fights must have a most demoralising effect upon a people so addicted to idleness and dissipation, and so accustomed to give way to the impulse of the moment.

He did not apparently wound her, but the reports brought her to the charge once more, and the elephant, by this time fairly tired of the game, and thoroughly demoralised with fear, bolted right away, and nearly cracked poor Fullerton's head against the branch of a tree.

If he succeed in demoralising the line of elephants, roaring and dashing furiously about, he will then try in the confusion to double through, unless he is too badly wounded to be able to travel fast, in which case he will fight to the end.

The elephant on which the unfortunate planter sat got demoralised and attempted to bolt.

When we consider who were Seneca's accusers, we are not forced to believe his guilt; his character was indeed deplorably weak, and the laxity of the age in such matters was fearfully demoralising; but there are sufficient circumstances in his favour to justify us in returning a verdict of "Not guilty."

We at once see the object of Caius, and how the justice of it might have blinded him to the demoralising effects of his measure.

He would come back more and more demoralised, anaesthetised as to what passed within him, the habit of his conscience broken, a stranger in his house, in himself;and that is why he felt more at home out of doors than in.

He pointed out the demoralising effect of the Armenian massacres, and the danger of Jemal the Great's attitude towards the Arabs in Syria, realising, and seeking to make them realise, the stupendous folly of making enemies of the subject peoples, and urging the re-establishment of cordial relations between the Turks and them.

Nature is the only doctor who ever cures anybody, Colonel; we humans, for all our pill-boxes and lancets, can only prompt herand devilish demoralising advice we generally give her, too," he added, with a chuckle.

"His head seems full of literature, and he is so idle that he is demoralising the whole office.

Mr. Lingard wrote "demoralise."

" "To stem such a passion, or even to have given it a legal form, would have been merely ridiculous and absurd in the eyes of the demoralised circle by which he was surrounded.

If the effort had been made at the right time the Russian people and soldiery would not have become so demoralised and hopeless as they had when I arrived, and millions of lives would have been saved from untold tortures.

The enemy were entirely demoralised, and never made another stand east of Lake Baikal.

The Terrorists were completely demoralised, so that the army advanced to Glasoff, 80 miles east of Vatka and 60 miles south of Koltass.

I have visited some hundreds of such, throughout the country, and can positively assert that the demoralising tendency of too many is awful!

" Harris was routed, absolutely demoralised.

IS THE ARMY GOING TO RELEASE HIM?" "WELL, 'E'S GOT A FORTNIGHT BEFORE HE GOES BACK, BUT BY THAT TIME 'E 'OPES TO BE DEMORALISED.

The judges, moreover, in the Anglo-Saxon communities are appointed from among the leading barristers, an arrangement that a child can see is demoralising and inadvisable.

Manifestly Greek must be dropped as a part of the general curriculum for a highly educated man, for the simple reason that now there are scarcely any competent teachers, and because the sham of teaching it partially and pretentiously demoralises student and school alike.

The spoils taken were valued at three millions of crowns, and this in the end proved the ruin of the French power in Italy, for so many of the soldiers, demoralised by plunder, deserted with their ill-gotten gains and went home.

You find it, as described by a witness called yesterday, in the overcrowding of our cities and country villages, and the necessarily demoralising effects resulting from that over-crowding.

The Solicitor-General, while doubtless admitting the evils and mischiefs of excessive population, argues that the checks proposed are demoralising in their effects, and that it is better to bear the ills we have than have recourse to remedies having such demoralising results.

The Solicitor-General, while doubtless admitting the evils and mischiefs of excessive population, argues that the checks proposed are demoralising in their effects, and that it is better to bear the ills we have than have recourse to remedies having such demoralising results.

After this, Wieck wrote to Behrens protesting against his lending a hand to "a demoralised girl without shame."

She dashed into the house, and found a demoralised kitchen-maid calling incoherently for help down the telephone.

Mere charity for instance, while relieving the pinch of hunger, demoralises the recipient.

The workman of the new generation is full of distrust the most demoralising of social influences.

Each year more little ones are brought in from the fields and hills to live in the degrading and demoralising atmosphere of the mill towns...." Children are deliberately imported by the Italians.

Hurried and driven men glorify "push" and impatience, and despise finish and fine discriminations as weak and demoralising things.

I was altogether demoralised.

To some of us, this trend of using designations as carrots or baits, and apparently handed out in a manner far from fair was demoralising, specially since we had run the show when nobody was around.

After another hour of this excitement, priests and people became alike demoralised, and the meeting broke up in a confusion of terror.

of caution in extirpating error, with M. Renan's invitation to men whom he considers wrong in their interpretation of religion, to plant their error as widely and deeply as they can; and who are moreover themselves supposed to be demoralised, or else they would not be likely to acquiesce in a previous surrender of the universities to men whom they think in mortal error.

It is hard to decide which is the more discreditable and demoralising sight.

It is a very easy thing for people endowed with the fanatical temperament, or demoralised by the habit of looking at society exclusively from the juridical point of view, to insist that no respect at all, except the respect that arises from being too weak to have your own way, is due from either to the other.

His Palazzo del Te will always remain the monument of a specific moment in Renaissance history, since it is adequate to the intellectual conditions of a race demoralised but living still with largeness and a sense of grandeur.

The hearty and earnest political and individual life which is found when every man has a continual sense of public responsibility, and knows that success depends on his own right judgment and exertion, is replaced under a despotism by an indolent reliance upon what its master may direct, and by a demoralising conviction that personal advancement is best secured by solicitations and favour.

The citizens piled from their couches and raced pell-mell into the streets, unbelieving, demoralised.

During the long, sickening weeks that preceded the coming of the Syndicate, Hollingsworth Chase toiled faithfully, resolutely for the restoration of order and system among the demoralised people of Japat.

Such incidents were happening constantly to-day, and seriously demoralising the dog teams.

The rumour that it is to be used for Army jam has had a most demoralising effect upon the market in imported tomatoes.

For the attraction of the place, were it given play, would completely demoralise Meaux and the entire district.

The model sits only three times a week: the other days we worked from the plaster cast; and to be there by seven o'clock in the morning required so painful an effort of will, that I glanced in terror down the dim and grey perspective of early risings that awaited me; then, demoralised by the lassitude of Sunday, I told my valet on Monday morning to leave the room, that I would return to the beaux arts no more.

I laughed at these verbal eccentricities, but they were not without their effect, and that effect was a demoralising one; for in me they aggravated the fever of the unknown, and whetted my appetite for the strange, abnormal and unhealthy in art.

Remember, too, that War must always have its demoralising features, however splendid the cause for which you are fighting.

The rear of a battle is, even in the time of victory, a place of demoralising influence.

For this there were at the time several apparent advantages; the army of the Potomac had been twice beaten and, while by no means demoralised, was discouraged and no longer had faith in its commander.

The arrival of Sheridan at the critical hour in the afternoon of the 19th of October did not, as has sometimes been stated, check the retreat of a demoralised army.

But she wrote him: "It is not you who have written this injury for my eyes to read, but another man, demoralised by the world's crueltynot knowing what he is sayinghurt to the soul, not mortally.

Past them sped a company of cavalry in blue and yellow, bouncing considerably in their saddles, red faces very dusty under their tightly strapped caps, sabres and canteens jangling like an unexpected avalanche of tin-ware in a demoralised pantry.

You mustn't make such a racket or they'll put us both out!"keeping the table carefully between them, dodging every strategy of his, every endeavour to make her prisoner, quick, graceful, demoralising in her beauty and abandon.

Our negroes moaned and sobbed all day, all night, helpless, utterly demoralised.

"I will now further prove to you the truth of my assertion concerning this degrading and demoralising condition of affairs.

If, in any way, her faith in you has been poisoned, remember what was laid before her, proven in black and white, apparently; remember, more than that, the terrible and physically demoralising strain she has been under in the line of duty.

Fatigued past all endurance, shaken, demoralised, everything in her was giving way now.

It may, however, be said in extenuation of the lack of hospitality on the part of the missionaries of which he complains, that many of the early residents and European visitors to New Zealand were of an undesirable class, and that they exercised a demoralising influence upon the Maoris.

But I will even go further: religions have very frequently a decidedly demoralising influence.

The demoralising influence of religion is less problematical than its moral influence.

This change is slowly working its way in Great Britainslowly, but perceptibly here and therethanks to the faithful and persevering efforts put forth by good and true men, to enlighten the subjects of this impoverishing and demoralising custom, which has ruled with such despotism over the laborers of the land.

Even Victor Hugo's strong spirit does not quite overcome the demoralising doctrine of a certain revolutionary school, though he has the poet's excuse.

Earthquakes are demoralising; but they bring out all the weaknesses of human nature.

A domestic servant receives a character, which is, if satisfactory, a sure means of employment; a teacher, inspector, etc., has a certificate which is a pronouncement of efficiency; but however great the achievement of the theatre there is no lasting sign of your work, and the want of definite aim is mentally demoralising.

The model sits only three times a week: the other days we worked from the plaster cast; and to be there by seven o'clock in the morning required so painful an effort of will, that I glanced in terror down the dim and grey perspective of early risings that awaited me; then, demoralised by the lassitude of Sunday, I told my valet on Monday morning to leave the room, that I would return to the Beaux Arts no more.

I laughed at these verbal eccentricities, but they were not without their effect, and that a demoralising one; for in me they aggravated the fever of the unknown, and whetted my appetite for the strange, abnormal and unhealthy in art.

And I'll tell, in simple language, what I know about the shine Which demoralised our kitchen, and which bust up our Big Dine.

And I've told in simple language all I know about the shine That demoralised our kitchen, and upset the year's Big Dine!

"For ony sake," muttered the now demoralised Tosh, "drop the subject, and I'll gie ye a bit ham o' ma ain!

"Well, if you are right, the Boche must be getting demoralised.

At present he is too demoralised to attempt anything beyond intermittent machine-gun fire.

"He's fair demoralised, like the rest.

To this must be added the demoralising influence of American whalers, who have given the settled Koraks rum and cursed them with horrible diseases, which are only aggravated by their diet and mode of life.

From nearly all these demoralising influences the Wandering Koraks are removed by the very nature of their life.

With the exception of a noticeable but restrained inclination on the part of Dodd and myself to curl up our legs and sit on the floor, there was nothing I believe in our behaviour to betray the barbarous freedom of the life which we had so recently lived, and the demoralising character of the influences to which we had been subjected.

Astronomical science I assured them did not recognise any such eclipses as those produced by swallowing the planets, and however satisfactory such a course might be to them, it was very demoralising to my orrery.

COOPERAGE, a system of barter which has for some time gone on in the North Seas, consisting of exchange of spirits and tobacco for other goods or money, a demoralising traffic, which endeavours are now being made to suppress.

Then in the second act it was clear that the success was growing to be an ovation, and the ovation a furore, in which the house became entirely demoralised, and vouchsafed to listen only so long as Nino was singingscreaming with delight before he had finished what he had to sing in each scene.

There is something very demoralising in the air of the Chambers; it makes the best people vain without their knowing it.

" So quickly has he outgrown his feelings of a year ago: then it was the intrigues of diplomatists that had seemed to him useless and demoralising.

When the German leaders began to disagree as to the best methods to conduct the war, the effect upon the people was demoralising.

Such a privilege might not be well thought of by the neighbouring planters; indeed, it is almost what one might call a whity-brown idea, dangerous, demoralising, inflammatory, incendiary.

It may, I think, be mentioned also, in the way of warning men generally against the hardening and demoralising effects of habitual drunkenness.

"One feels so demoralised at this end of the night.

It's demoralising for all concerned."

Their real tyranny was the tyranny of aggressive reason over the cowed and demoralised human spirit.