Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
[[pattern.intro.replace(',','')]]. Learn More
3092 example sentences with  di

3092 example sentences with di

[Footnote: The first six of these sonnets are translated (not directly, but through the French of Clement Marot) from Petrarch's third Canzone in Morte di Laura.

[Greek: Kaì eis henà Kyrion Iaesoun Christòn, tòn uhiòn tou Theou monogenae, tòn ek tou patròs gennaethénta, Theòn alaethinòn, prò pántôn tôn aiônôn, di' ohu pánta egéneto].

Foreign Secretary: Marquis di San Giuliano.

The mutual incompatibility of the two voices of Germany was pointed out from Rome, where the Marquis di San Giuliano, the Italian Foreign Minister, attempted a reconciliation between them, on information received from Berlin, that 'the difficulty was rather the "conference" than the principle'.

This attitude of mind was known and deplored in Rome, where the Marquis di San Giuliano said 'there seemed to be a difficulty in making Germany believe that Russia was in earnest'.

Next day the Marquis di San Giuliano called attention to a point in Servia's reply to Austria which might form a starting-point for mediation.

He felt so re-as-su-red by this ex-tra-or-di-na-ry ad-ven-ture, which pro-mi-sed so well for his fu-ture suc-cess, that he leap-ed and dan-ced a-long his path with ex-cite-ment and de-light: he look-ed for-ward to no ob-sta-cle to stop him in his ca-reer, and he pur-su-ed his way re-joic-ing.

He a-rose, and pro-ceed-ed to-wards the di-rec-tion of the sounds, which grew loud-er and loud-er as he ad-van-ced; when, com-ing to the edge of a pre-ci-pice, he be-held a grand and aw-ful rush of foam-ing wa-ters, which threw them-selves head-long down the riv-en rocks with a deaf-en-ing roar and tu-mult.

how im-pos-si-ble it was for him to pro-ceed: in-deed, as he sat him-self down on the edge of the ca-ta-ract, he could not help weep-ing at his un-ex-pect-ed di-lem-ma.

He sigh-ed as he look-ed up-on such a-bun-dance, which would have di-ned sump-tu-ous-ly his own na-tive vil-lage.

The o-gress di-ned, and smi-led up-on her trea-sure of a ser-vant.

Di.

Di.

Who, Philaster? Di.

Di.

Di. Marry I think she is one whom the State keeps for the Agents of our confederate Princes: she'll cog and lie with a whole army before the League shall break: her name is common through the Kingdom, and the Trophies of her dishonour, advanced beyond Hercules-pillars.

La. Do you laugh Madam? Di. Your desires upon you Ladies.

Di. When 'tis at best, 'twill be but half done, Whilst so brave a Gentleman's wrong'd and flung off.

Di. I fear not for my self, and yet I fear too:

Di. Now it heats.

Di. Here's a fellow has some fire in's veins: The outlandish Prince looks like a Tooth-drawer.

Di. I thank you Sir, you dare not for the people.

Di. Do you know what you do?

Di. Go on: And be as truly happy as thou art fearless: Come Gentlemen, let's make our friends acquainted, Lest the King prove false.

Di. Come Ladies, shall we talk a round?

Di. May your dreams be true to you; What shall we do Gallants?

Di. Why Gentlemen, 'tis without question so.

Di. Since it is true, and tends to his own good, I'le make this new report to be my knowledge, I'le say I know it, nay, I'le swear I saw it.

Di. This is most strange; Sure he does love her.

Di.

Di. Why, she was taken at it.

Oh good gods, a little boy? Di. I, know you him my Lord?

she would have one Should meet her thoughts and knows the sin he acts, Which is the great delight of wickedness; You are abus'd, and so is she, and I. Di. How you my Lord?

Di.

Di. And for his horn, has left it at the Lodge where he lay late; Oh, he's a precious Lime-hound; turn him loose upon the pursuit of a Lady, and if he lose her, hang him up i'th' slip.

Di. See, see, how modestly your Lady looks, as if she came from Churching with her Neighbour; why, what a Devil can a man see in her face, but that she's honest?

Di. This is the strangest sudden change!

Di. Saw you a Lady come this way on a Sable-horse stubbed with stars of white?

Di. Let him seek his Daughter himself; she cannot stray about a little necessary natural business, but the whole Court must be in Arms; when she has done, we shall have peace.

Di. Sir, I do not know.

Di.

Di.

Di. No; nor smell sweet it self, if once the Lungs Be but corrupted.

Di. What will he carry it to Spain in's pocket?

Di.

Di. Stay Sir, what are you?

Di. Betrayed!

Di. 'Tis the Lord Philaster.

Di. Death?

Di. Fear it not, their overwise heads will think it but a trick.

Di.

Di. All they were but scratches; but the loss of bloud made him faint.

Di. We'l scuffle hard before he perish.

Di. Oh brave followers; Mutiny, my fine dear Country-men, mutiny, Now my brave valiant foremen, shew your weapons In honour of your Mistresses.

Di. A thousand blessings on 'em.

Di. Then the same Devil take the foremost too, and sowce him for his breakfast; if they all prove Cowards, my curses fly amongst them and be speeding.

[Exit Cle. Di.

Di. Come Sir, your tender flesh will try your constancie.

Will he confess? Di.

Di. Why speak'st thou not?

Di.

Di. But thou speak'st As like Euphrasia as thou dost look, How came it to thy knowledge that she lives in Pilgrimage?

Di.

Di. Why my shame, it is a woman, let her speak the rest.

A grasshopper sat in a greenwood tree, Tum-tum-tum tiddle di! "Oh, where are you going?"

Imola Illustrato nella Vita e nelle Opere, e di lui Comento Latino sulla Divina Commedia di Dante Allghieri voltalo in Italiano dall' Avvocato GIOVANNI TAMBURINI.

Imola Illustrato nella Vita e nelle Opere, e di lui Comento Latino sulla Divina Commedia di Dante Allghieri voltalo in Italiano dall' Avvocato GIOVANNI TAMBURINI.

TAMBURINI Qui Dante fa menzione di Guido Guerra, e meravigliano molti della modestia dell' autore, che da costui e dalla di lui moglie tragga l'origine sua, mentre poteva derivarla care di gratitudine affettuosa a quella,Gualdrada,stipito suo,dandole nome e tramandandola quasi all' eternità, mentre per stessa sarebbe forse rimasta sconosciuta.

TAMBURINI Qui Dante fa menzione di Guido Guerra, e meravigliano molti della modestia dell' autore, che da costui e dalla di lui moglie tragga l'origine sua, mentre poteva derivarla care di gratitudine affettuosa a quella,Gualdrada,stipito suo,dandole nome e tramandandola quasi all' eternità, mentre per stessa sarebbe forse rimasta sconosciuta.

TAMBURINI Qui Dante fa menzione di Guido Guerra, e meravigliano molti della modestia dell' autore, che da costui e dalla di lui moglie tragga l'origine sua, mentre poteva derivarla care di gratitudine affettuosa a quella,Gualdrada,stipito suo,dandole nome e tramandandola quasi all' eternità, mentre per stessa sarebbe forse rimasta sconosciuta.

Al tempo di Guido in Brettinoro anche i nobili aravano le terre; ma insorsero discordie fra essi, e sparve la innocenza di vita, e con essa la liberalità.

Al tempo di Guido in Brettinoro anche i nobili aravano le terre; ma insorsero discordie fra essi, e sparve la innocenza di vita, e con essa la liberalità.

I brettinoresi determinarono di alzare in piazza una colonna con intorno tanti anelli di ferro, quanto le nobili famiglie di quel castello, e chi fosse arrivato ed avesse legato il cavallo ad uno de' predetti anelli, doveva esser ospite della famiglia, che indicava l' anello cui il cavallo era attaccato.

I brettinoresi determinarono di alzare in piazza una colonna con intorno tanti anelli di ferro, quanto le nobili famiglie di quel castello, e chi fosse arrivato ed avesse legato il cavallo ad uno de' predetti anelli, doveva esser ospite della famiglia, che indicava l' anello cui il cavallo era attaccato.

I brettinoresi determinarono di alzare in piazza una colonna con intorno tanti anelli di ferro, quanto le nobili famiglie di quel castello, e chi fosse arrivato ed avesse legato il cavallo ad uno de' predetti anelli, doveva esser ospite della famiglia, che indicava l' anello cui il cavallo era attaccato.

"Ad confirmandum propositum," says Benvenuto, "oceurrit mihi res jocosa,"[A]"In confirmation of this statement, a laughable matter occurs to me"; and he goes on to relate a story about the famous astrologer Pietro di Abano.

But our translator is not content without making him stultify himself, and renders the words we have quoted, "A maggiore conferma referiro un fatto a me accaduto"; that is, he makes Benvenuto say, "I will report an incident that happened to me," and then go on to tell the story of Pietro di Abano, which had no more to do with him than with Signor Tamburini himself.

Per me ritengo, che quattro fossero le cagioni per cui la Romagna si ridusse a tanta desolazione: l' abuso per avarizia di alcuni ecclesiastici, che alienarono or una, or un' altra terra, e si misero d' accordo coi tiranni,i tiranni stessi che sempre erano discordi fra loro a danno de' sudditi,la fertilità de' terreni, che troppo alletta gli strani, ed i barbari,l' invidia, che regna

A passage in which the spirit of the poet has fully roused his manly commentator is the noble burst of indignant reproach with which he inveighs against and mourns over Italy in Canto VI. of the "Purgatory": Ahi serva Italia, di dolore ostello, Nave senza nocchiero in gran tempesta, Non donna di provincie, ma bordello.

A passage in which the spirit of the poet has fully roused his manly commentator is the noble burst of indignant reproach with which he inveighs against and mourns over Italy in Canto VI. of the "Purgatory": Ahi serva Italia, di dolore ostello, Nave senza nocchiero in gran tempesta, Non donna di provincie, ma bordello.

L'angoscia per altro vinse sul di lui animo, perchè fu preso da tal dolore, che si mordeva e lacerava le membra, e cosi terminò sua vita.

In tal modo nel corso della vita di Bonifazio fu verificata la profezia di Celestino.

In tal modo nel corso della vita di Bonifazio fu verificata la profezia di Celestino.

Now this whole passage is omitted in Signor Tamburini's work; and in its place appears a literal transcript from Costa's note, as follows: "Veramente fu più mirabile cosa vedere il Giordano volto all' indietro o fuggire il mare, quando così volle Iddio, che non sarebbe vedere qui il provvedimento a quel male, che per colpa de' traviati religiosi viene alia Chiesa di Dio."

Few women were attracted to this school, and the only one whose association with the Naturalisti is recordedAniella di Rosapaid for her temerity with her life.

This singular picture was dedicated and placed over the high altar of the Conception in the church of the Servi, who, under the title of Serviti di Maria, were dedicated to the especial service of the Virgin Mary.

Titian himself is looking up, and near him stands his friend, Andrea de' Franceschi, grand-chancellor of Venice, robed as a Cavaliero di San Marco.

It was painted by Raphael in his twenty-first year, for the church of S. Francesco, in Città di Castello; and though he has closely followed the conception of his master, it is modified by that ethereal grace which even then distinguished him.

La Visitazione di Maria.

In this poetical version of the subject, Lorenzo di Credi, Perugino, Francia, and Bellini, excelled all others.

In a picture by Lorenzo di Credi (Florence, Pal.

Also at Città di Castello; same date.] Joseph, says the Gospel story, "arose by night;" hence there is both meaning and propriety in those pictures which represent the Flight as a night-scene, illuminated by the moon and stars, though I believe this has been done more to exhibit the painter's mastery over effects of dubious light, than as a matter of biblical accuracy.

One is a fresco by Giovanni di San Giovanni, which, having been cut from the wail of some suppressed convent, is now in the academy at Florence.

Voi che siete, sorella mia, Tutta piena di cortesia, Dio vi renda la carità Per l'infinità sua bontà.

Che sei piena di cortesia, Mostramelo per favore Lo tuo Figlio Redentore! And now, O Lady mine, that art full of courtesy, grant me to look upon thy Son, the Redeemer!

A picture by Lorenzo di Pavia, painted about 1513, exhibits a very complete example of this family group.

The duke of Mantua, having received so many proofs of his various merit, made him tutor to his son Vicentio di Gonzaga, a prince of loose manners and turbulent disposition.

They alighted at last at the Prince di Lauria'sGaspard's father-in-law and old friend.

The person represented closely resembles Prospero Colonna (1464-1523), whose authentic likeness is to be seen (a) In an engraving in Pompilio Totti's "Ritratti et Elogie di Capitani illustri.

Mr. Claude Phillips, in his Earlier Work of Titian, p. 58, note, objects that Vasari's "giubone di raso inargentato" is not the superbly luminous steel-grey sleeve of this "Ariosto," but surely a vest of satin embroidered with silver.