Do we say excrete or secrete

excrete 7 occurrences

The cell can secrete and excrete substance, and, in brief, presents nearly all the phenomena of a human being.

There is a close relationship between the skin and the kidneys, as both excrete organic and saline matter.

Alcoholic liquors excite and irritate the delicate renal membranes, and speedily disturb and eventually destroy their capacity to excrete the proper materials from the blood.

V. excrete &c (eject) 297; emanate &c (come out) 295.

None of us will ever eat the whole corpus, but Google can digest it for us and excrete the steaming nuggets of goodness that make it the search-engine miracle it is today.

Because of certain fluids which the roots excrete from their slender extremities; and in this manner the likings and antipathies of certain plants may be accounted for.

All that is likely to produce acrid humours, and an inflamatory or impoverished state of the blood, engenders vicious secretions, which nature struggles to free herself from by the natural outlet of the skin, for this organ is fitted equally, to excrete and secrete.

secrete 134 occurrences

A glance round the room convinced Rolfe that it was impossible for a man to secrete himself in it.

Thus the sweat glands of the skin secrete the perspiration as their secretion, the lachrymal glands of the eyes the tears as theirs.

Hast thou the package, child, which I trusted to thy keeping at my last visit?" "It is here," answered Gelsomina, opening a drawer, and handing to her cousin a small but closely enveloped package, which, unknown to herself, contained some articles of forbidden commerce, and which the other, in her indefatigable activity, had been obliged to secrete for a time.

It is apparently not the ductless glands alone that furnish internal secretions; the glands that are provided with ducts and yield a definite and observable product secrete also a substance (perhaps more than one) which they give up to the blood.

V. conceal, hide, secrete, put out of sight; lock up, seal up, bottle up.

He could smile a little as Graham stooped, peering beneath the bed, as he moved each piece of furniture large enough to secrete a man.

He alone was capable of testifying that the evidence had been removed as if to secrete it from his unlawful hand.

He must fly or secrete himself, or perhaps lose a head in which there was concealed a considerable amount of Scotch cunning.

He was anxious to secrete from the rapacity of the cossacks first the consecrated vessels, and then his own little treasures.

I have been careful to secrete it so that the most ingenious detectives and the largest rewards will not be able to obtain a hint of its whereabouts.

If the blood be not properly prepared by the action of good air, how can the arteries of the stomach secrete good gastric juice?

Even if the comma bacilli are not found in the urine, other bacteria are; and even Koch supposes that they secrete a virulent poison similar to that of some insects, which may be absorbed into the blood and escape from the kidneys.

before he could secrete it, his master (a hot, voluble Frenchman), came in upon us, and the book was thrust under the velvet of the cushion.

SEE Lucas De Peslouan, Jean. PETER, MARIE LOUISE ROSTAGNY. Vie secrete de l'Academie francaise.

Vie secrete de l'Academie francaise.

Histoire secrete de la conciliation de Munich.

Allemagne secrete.

La Bible, document chiffre: essai sur la restitution des clefs de la science numerale secrete.

"The colored people never wish to secrete themselves from me; for they know I am their true friend.

I must now secrete this for some days, but will hereafter resume my little narrative, and explain how I have ventured to write so much even in the very neighbourhood of the Guillotine.

They fly about and fertilize the sacklike females, which then molt again and secrete the thin wax scale over them.

And as permission must be got by those in pursuit of him, from the authorities of the island to land and take him, he thus gains time to secrete himself.

All that is likely to produce acrid humours, and an inflamatory or impoverished state of the blood, engenders vicious secretions, which nature struggles to free herself from by the natural outlet of the skin, for this organ is fitted equally, to excrete and secrete.

It is an amphibious plant, thriving only in water or wet soils, is very productive, and the stalks after a summer's growth secrete a large quantity of sugar.

My conscience so disturbed me on the score of this theft, that I hastened to secrete my only remaining piece of gold in the glazier's box; ill-judged, as this appeared to me on reflection.

Do we say   excrete   or  secrete