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142 example sentences with  fairest maid

142 example sentences with fairest maid

Fair Maid Phil.

Fair Maid! forgive me all my shameful Passion, And charge my Fault upon your Beauty only.

In the prologue to The Fair Maid of the Inn (licensed 1626), good plays are spoken of as often scurvily treated, whilst A Jigge shall be clapt at, and every rhime Prais'd and applauded by a clam'rous chyme.

A negro in cotton drawers, shivering in our northern dune, had more attraction for me than the fairest maid,

'Twas thus he sang of love, and in a dream The fair maids sighed to hear.

Of the many other plants dedicated to the Virgin may be mentioned the snowdrop, popularly known as the "fair maid of February," opening its floweret at the time of Candlemas.

And Hamlet's love for this fair maid came back to him, and he could not bear that a brother should shew so much transport of grief, for he thought that he loved Ophelia better than forty thousand brothers.

Quoth he, "Whither away, fair maids?"

Fair maid, is't so?

Why, answer not; remember what I said: Yonder, I see, comes Jenny, that fair maid.

Fair maids, come choose or buy.

Fair maid, it's thus in brief: This abbey by your means may have relief; An hundred marks a year.

Chaste maid, fair maid, look up and speak to me.

And because most meats unsauced are motives to drouth, He shall have a lemon to moisten his mouth, A lemon I mean; no lemon I trow; Take heed, my fair maids, you take me not so.

And think so still, so Stella know my mind: Profess, indeed, I do not Cupid's art; But you, fair maids, at length this true shall find, That his right badge is but worn in the heart.

Alight, fair maids, and nominate your idea provokers.

Then a thought came to me (waked perchance by the mention of shooting the rope over to the hulk by means of a mortar) how that I had read once in a book, of a fair maid whose lover effected her escape from a castle by a similar artifice, only that in his case he made use of a bow in place of a mortar, and a cord instead of a rope, his sweetheart hauling up the rope by means of the cord.

The Fair Maid of the Inn, a Comedy; part of this play is taken from Causin's Holy Court, and Wanley's History of Man.

The Fair Maid of the West, or a Girl worth Gold, 1631.

The Fair Maid of the Exchance; with the Merry Humours of the Cripple of Fen-church, a comedy, 1637.

THE FIRST OF MAY The fair maid who, the first of May, Goes to the fields at break of day, And washes in dew from the hawthorn-tree, Will ever after handsome be.

The two best, if the reader would obtain his own idea of Heywood's undoubted ability, are A Woman killed with Kindness, a pathetic story of domestic life, and The Fair Maid of the West, a melodrama with plenty of fighting of the popular kind.

45 The Fair Maid of the Inn.

Heywood was fond of stirring adventures: he is quite at home on the sea, and delights in nothing more than in describing a sea-fight; witness his Fortunes by Land and Sea, and the two parts of the Fair Maid of the West.

Benedictus Victorius Faventinus, in his empirics, accounts it an especial remedy against melancholy, [3508]"to hear and see singing, dancing, maskers, mummers, to converse with such merry fellows and fair maids."

To expel grief, and procure pleasure, sweet smells, good diet, touch, taste, embracing, singing, dancing, sports, plays, and above the rest, exquisite beauties, quibus oculi jucunde moventur et animi, are most powerful means, obvia forma, to meet or see a fair maid pass by, or to be in company with her.

If it so fall out (as often it doth) that such peasants are preferred by reason of their wealth, chance, error, &c., or otherwise, yet as the cat in the fable, when she was turned to a fair maid, would play with mice; a cur will be a cur, a clown will be a clown, he will likely savour of the stock whence he came, and that innate rusticity can hardly be shaken off.

[4903] Xenophiles, a philosopher, railed at women downright for many years together, scorned, hated, scoffed at them; coming at last into Daphnis a fair maid's company (as he condoles his mishap to his friend Demaritis), though free before, Intactus nullis ante cupidinibus, was far in love, and quite overcome upon a sudden.

Philocharinus, in [5062] Aristaenetus, met a fair maid by chance, a mere stranger to him, he looked back at her, she looked back at him again, and smiled withal.

Robert, Duke of Normandy, riding by Falais, spied Arlette, a fair maid, as she danced on a green, and was so much enamoured with the object, that she must needs lie with her that night.

Galeatus of Mantua did a little more: for when he was almost mad for love of a fair maid in the city, she, to try him belike what he would do for her sake, bade him in jest leap into the river Po if he loved her; he forthwith did leap headlong off the bridge and was drowned.

" "Fair maids, go gather roses in the prime, And think that as a flower so goes on time."

If they might so take and choose whom they list out of all the fair maids their nation affords, they could happily condescend to marry: otherwise, &c., why should a man marry, saith another epicurean rout, what's matrimony but a matter of money?

An old bawdy nurse in Aristaenetus, (like that Spanish Caelestina, quae, quinque mille virgines fecit mulieres, totidemque mulieres arte sua virgines) when a fair maid of her acquaintance wept and made her moan to her, how she had been deflowered, and now ready to be married, was afraid it would be perceived, comfortably replied, Noli vereri filia, &c.

Mrs. Armstrong is the breeder of two beautiful dog hounds in Talisman and Laird of Abbotsford, and of two typically good bitches in Fair Maid of Perth and Bride of Lammermoor.

Oh she tripped over Ocknell plain, And down by Bradley Water; And the fairest maid on the forest side Was Jane, the keeper's daughter.

Now all you fair maids, be warned by me, (Follow, my love, come over the strand) Scots never were true, nor ever will be, To lord, nor lady, nor fair England.

But in England the crocus and the snowdropneither being probably an indigenous flower, since neither is mentioned by Chaucerusually open before the first of March; indeed, the snowdrop was formerly known by the yet more fanciful name of "Fair Maid of February."

As the damsel was departing from the court, Balin called to her and said: "Fair maid, I beg you to let me try to draw the sword, for though I am poorly clad I feel in my heart that I am as good as many who have tried, and I think I can succeed.

And where is this fair maid who has been the cause of the broil?" "Where is Adele, Pierre?" asked the merchant of the old servant, who had carried in the silver tray with a squat flask and tinted Venetian glasses.

ANJOU (The Fair Maid of), lady Edith Plantagenet, who married David earl of Huntingdon (a royal prince of Scotland).

ANSELM, prior of St. Dominic, the confessor of king Henry IV.Sir W. Scott, The Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Anton, one of Henry Smith's men in The Fair Maid of Perth, by sir W. Scott (time, Henry IV.).

Baยดliol (Mrs.), friend of Mr. Croftangry, in the introductory chapter of The Fair Maid of Perth, a novel by sir W. Scott (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

"Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

BON'THORN (Anthony), one of Ramorny's followers; employed to murder Smith, the lover of Catherine Glover ("the fair maid of Perth"), but he murdered Oliver instead, by mistake.

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, The Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

The second series contains The Fair Maid of Perth.

Conachar is in love with his master's daughter, Catharine, called "the fair maid of Perth;" but Catharine loves and ultimately marries Henry Smith, the armorer.

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

CROFTANGRY (Mr. Chrystal), a gentleman fallen to decay, cousin of Mrs. Martha Bethune Baliol, to whom at death, he left the MS. of two novels, one The Highland Widow, and the other The Fair Maid of Perth, called the First and Second Series of the "Chronicles of Canongate" (q. v.).

The history of Mr. Chrystal Croftangry is given in the introductory chapters of The Highland Widow, and continued in the introduction of the The Fair Maid of Perth.

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time Henry IV.).

EDITH PLANTAGENET (The lady), called "The Fair Maid of Anjou," a kinswoman of Richard I., and attendant of Queen Berenga'ria.

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

EVIOT, page to Sir John Ramorny (master of the horse to Prince Robert of Scotland).Sir W. Scott, Fair Maid of Perth (time, Henry IV.).

"Save thee, fair maid, for our armies are flying; Save thee, fair maid, for thy guardian is low; Cold on yon heath thy bold Frederick is lying, Fast through the woodland approaches the foe."

"Save thee, fair maid, for our armies are flying; Save thee, fair maid, for thy guardian is low; Cold on yon heath thy bold Frederick is lying, Fast through the woodland approaches the foe."

"Ho! strike the flag-staff deep, Sir Knight, Ho! scatter flowers, fair maids, Ho!

And Mist I am come to proffer My crown and my sceptre to lay at your feet; It is not every day in the week you may meet, Fair Maid, with a Prince's offer.

The Fair Maid of Perth.

As this or that fair maid trips past, Once, and with lesser stir We viewed the grace of love, at last, And turned idolater.

Fair maid, we talk of times long past; A friend we often mourn in vain A knight in distant battle slain, Whose bones had moulder'd in the earth Full many a year before thy birth.

Alone the youths made answer, "That cannot be, you fairest maid, that you with us be taken!

Captain Winter, however, saw nothing but the fair maid, whose pearly white teeth shone out from between her red lips.

He remembered no less than three fair maids who had, that evening, called his attention, by one means and another, to points less attractive than their own in other girls.

"Fair maid," said I, "have you heard the refrain of the song that I love so well?

"Farewell to you, fair maid!"

Have ye any braches to spade, Or e're a fair maid That would be a Nun, Come kiss me, 'tis done.

Bring out your Cony-skins, fair maids to me, And hold 'em fair that I may see; Grey, black, and blue: for your smaller skins, I'll give ye looking-glasses, pins: And for your whole Coney, here's ready, ready Money.

Fair Maid, you may.

Fair maid, You only love to hear it often said; You do not doubt.

Part I. In Beaumont's and Fletcher's Fair Maid of the Inn, is the following allusion to the fern.

" "Yet had she lived, I might have had a thing to love," replied the old man; and then, looking at Tamar, he added, "They tell me you are the Laird's daughter,is it so, fair maid?"

FAIR MAID OF KENT, the Countess of Salisbury, eventually wife of the Black Prince, so called from her beauty.

FAIR MAID OF NORWAY, daughter of Eric II. of Norway, and granddaughter of Alexander III. of Scotland; died on her way from Norway to succeed her grandfather on the throne of Scotland, an event which gave

FAIR MAID OF PERTH, a beauty of the name of Kate Glover, the heroine of Scott's novel of the name.

In the summer of the same year another prophet met his death in the most dramatic fight of the war, that by which the friendly natives of the Wanganui district saved it from a Hau-Hau raid by a conflict fought on an island in the Wanganui River, after a fashion which would have warmed the heart of Sir Walter Scott had he been alive to hear of a combat so worthy of the clansmen in "The Fair Maid of Perth."

And as he spake the words, fair Ingeborg came in, Arrayed in bridal dress, and followed by fair maids, E'en as the stars escort the moon in heaven's vault.

The Fair Maid of Ribbesdale has a rime-scheme almost identical with that shown by one of Raimbaut d'Aurenga's poems; the description of the lady's beauty recalls many troubadour formulae: the concluding lines He myhte sayen pat crist hym seze, pat myhte nyhtes neh hyre leze, heuene he hevede here.

[She sings.] "Ye gods above, ye mighty gods, Anoint my head, I pray; Make strong my heart to bear my part Right kingly in the fray, To smite all foes, and steal the heart Of all fair maids away!"

"To smite all foes, and steal the heart Of all fair maids away!