Inspirassion

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157 examples of  ging  in sentences

157 examples of ging in sentences

Hah, Phillis, Leticia's Woman! Ging.

She was older than Kalitan, and, though only fifteen, was soon to be married to Tah-ge-ah, a fine young Indian who was ready to pay high for her, which was not strange, for she was both pretty and sweet.

"At the next full moon," said Kalitan, "there will be a potlatch, and Tanana will be sold to Tah-ge-ah.

She learned much good at the mission school, marry Tah-ge-ah, and make people better.

Tanana's marriage-feast was held, and she and Tah-ge-ah went to housekeeping in a little hut, where the one room was as clean and neat as could be, and not a bit like the dirty rooms of some of the natives.

Tah-ge-ah would take them to the mainland when she had enough made, and sell them to the travellers from the States.

Meantime Tah-ge-ah himself was very, very busy carving the totem-pole for his new home, for Tanana was a chieftain's daughter, and he, too, was of high caste, and their totem must be carved and stand one hundred feet high beside their door, lest they be reproached.

Page 5, "alway" changed to "always" (always dear to a boy) Page 82, "Tahgeah" changed to "Tah-ge-ah" (Tah-ge-ah would take them) Page 83, "Kalakash" changed to "Kala-kash" (Kala-kash had not asked

Page 5, "alway" changed to "always" (always dear to a boy) Page 82, "Tahgeah" changed to "Tah-ge-ah" (Tah-ge-ah would take them) Page 83, "Kalakash" changed to "Kala-kash" (Kala-kash had not asked

I am g-g-glad of th-th-that, my fa-fa-father the p-p-porter sha-shall ge-ge-get a f-f-fee by you.

I am g-g-glad of th-th-that, my fa-fa-father the p-p-porter sha-shall ge-ge-get a f-f-fee by you.

You sp-sp-speak like an honest ge-ge-gentleman, re-re-rest you me-me-merry!

You sp-sp-speak like an honest ge-ge-gentleman, re-re-rest you me-me-merry!

And a name was given to the Babe Angel, and it was to be called Ge-Urania, because its production was of earth and heaven.

And nothing else? Ge.

Diana with her bowe and arrows keene Did often vse the chace in Forrests greene, And so, alas, the good Athenian knight And swifte Acteon herein tooke delight, And Atalanta, the Arcadian dame, Conceiu'd such wondrous pleasure in the game That, with her traine of Nymphs attending on, She came to hunt the Bore of Calydon. Ge.

Sil. Is it a bargaine Gemulo or not? Ge.

Ge.

Eurymine! Ge.

How shall I call her swaine but by her name? Ge.

Agreed; but whether shall begin his note? Ge.

As from the Oaken leaves the honie glides Where nightingales record upon the thorne Ge.

So all my sences cheere Ge.

Eurymine! Sil. Eurymine! Ge. Come foorth Sil.

Come foorth Ge.

The wood-mans Love Ge.

What, hath my mistresse got another man? Ge.

Eu. Faire youthes, you have forgot for what ye came: You seeke your Love, shee's gone. Ge.

Sil. Have ye found her? Ge.

I told ye so. Ge.

For all your dagger, wert not for your ging, I would knock my whipstock on your addle-head.

We may instance such a compound as =ar-ge-bland (=ar, "oar"; blendan, "to blend"), which conveys the idea of the companionship of the oar with the sea.

If anywhere, we shall, perhaps, find the whole meaning of Homer most clearly indicated in such words as those given (without any enforcement) to Achilles and Thetis near the beginning of the Iliad, as if to sound the pitch of Homer's poetry: mêter, hepi m hetekes ge minynthadion per heonta, timên per moi hophellen Olympios engyalixai Zeus hypsibremetês.

[Footnote 7: Reading [Greek: ei ge min echon].

Ge' lang!" were more effective than the hymn to the Sun buzzed by the little Fly?

* * 47 trea' son eu' lo gies de bat' ed phi los' o phy in ge nu' i ty ap pro' pri ate con' sum ma ted THE FEAST OF TONGUES.

He had not been ma-ny mi-nutes in-dul-ging in his grief, when he felt him-self gent-ly lift-ed from the ground by a gi-gan-tic hand, which pass-ed him high a-bove the threat-en-ing wa-ters, and pla-ced him in safe-ty on the op-po-site bank.

When he had col-lect-ed a suf-fi-ci-en-cy of dri-ed leaves to-ge-ther to make his rest-ing place soft-er, he pre-par-ed to lie down, when, to his as-to-nish-ment and de-light, he be-held the gi-gan-tic hands spread them-selves over him, with the fin-gers en-twin-ed, ma-king for him the most per-fect lit-tle tent in the world.

The mo-ment Wil-lie saw her, he back-ed down the steps, for she was an o-gress, and as ug-ly as o-gress-es ge-ne-ral-ly are.

With that, Wil-lie en-ter-ed, and soon found that he had plen-ty to do; for his first job was to get the o-gress's din-ner ready, who, in truth, had no de-li-cate ap-pe-tite, for the pro-vi-si-on con-sist-ed of fish, fowl, beef, soup, mut-ton, and ham-pers of ve-ge-ta-bles.

Rage made the face of the o-gress glow like a fur-nace, as she made a pounce at poor Wil-lie for his ill-ad-vis-ed speech; and she would have caught him in her gripe, had he not dod-ged round a large bun-dle of ve-ge-ta-bles which luck-i-ly lay on the floor.

Why, I do be-lieve that the gi-ant hands are drag-ging it along!

ge hoezoi]'So perish all who do the like again.'

41, and not too great a divergence in v. 16, vi. 1 ([Greek: pros to theathaenai, ei de mae ge misthon ouk echete]), and xix.

[239:1] [Greek: Ho mentoi ge proteros auton archaegos

[Greek: Ô moi egô páthô; ti ho dússuos; ouch hypakoúeis; Tàn Baítan apodùs eis kúmata tàena aleumai Hômer tôs thúnnôs skopiázetai Olpis ho gripéus. Káeka màe pothánô, ge màn teòn hadù tétuktai.

Diel and Kreiten say "es ging fast spurlos vorüber."

ge of white and swirling with bubbles.

The conquest of the Lake-shore region by San-ge-man and his Ojibwas may be as trustworthy a tale as the exploits of Romulus and Remus; and when we emerge into the light of European record, we find the Jesuit missionaries preaching the gospel at St. Ignace and the Sault St. Mary almost as early as the so-called Cavaliers were planting tobacco at Jamestown, or the Pilgrims smiting the heathen at Plymouth.

Murder of Soan-ga-ge-zhick, a Chippewa, at the head of the fallsIndian mode of intermentIndian prophetessTopic of interpreters and interpretationMode of studying the Indian languageThe Johnston familyVisitsKatewabeda, chief of Sandy LakeIndian mythology, and oral tales and legendsLiterary opinionPolitical opinionVisit of the chief Little PineVisit of WabishkepenaisA despairing IndianGeography.

He was a Chippewa from the interior called Soan-ga-ge-zhick, or the Strong Sky.

Making inquiries respecting the family of Soan-ga-ge-zhick, in order to direct some provisions to be issued to them, I learned that the widow is a prophetess among her people, or in other words a female Jossakeed, and is supposed to have much influence in this way.

Ta-gwa-ge, Autumn.

Gitche ie nay gow ge ait che gah, "they have put the sand over him" is a common expression among the Indians to indicate that a man is dead and buried.

The auxiliary verbs, have, shall, will, &c., taken from the tensal particles, are ge, gu, gei, go, ga.

Nin os ge pa min inMy father was a good man.

On turning the point of red sandstone rock, which the Indians call Pug-ge-do-wau (Portage), the Porcupine Mountains rose to our view, directly west, presenting an azure outline of very striking lineamentsan animal couchant.

We passed, in rapid succession, the Mauzhe-ma-gwoos or Trout, Graverod's, Unnebish, or Elm, and Pug-ge-do-wa, or Misery River, in Fishing Bay.

On the 25th we went three pauses to breakfast, in a hollow or ravine, and pushing on, crossed the last ridge, and at one o'clock reached the foot of Lake Ka-ge-no-gum-aug, a beautiful and elongated sheet of water, which is the source of this branch of the Maskigo River.

LAKE KA-GE-NO-GUM-AUG.At nine in the morning, we embarked on the lake in four canoes, having left the fifth at the other end of the portage for the La Pointe Indians to return.

Mr. Conner brought me, some days ago, a cranium of an Indian, named B-tow-i-ge-zhig (Both Sides of the Sun), who was killed and buried near his house in a singular way.

Hammer, Puk-ke-tai-e-gun, Wap-o-ge-gin. 18.

Kai gar Oaum etetukto pelorion oude epskei Andri ge sitophagps.]

Naepioi, oi kata bous uperionos Aeelioio Aesthion; autar o toisin apheileto vostimon aemao; Ton amothen ge, thea, thugater Dios, eipe kai eamin.] The man, for wisdom's various arts renown'd, Long exercised in woes, O muse!

In Schneider's Latin Grammar, the letters are named in the following manner; except Je and Ve, which are omitted by this author: "A, Be, Ce, De, E, Ef, Ge, Ha, I, [Je,] Ka, El, Em, En, O, Pe, Cu, Er, Es, Te, U, [Ve,]

," says this author, "are named by placing e after them; as, be, ce, de, ge, except q, which ends in u." See p. 8.

G is always hard, or guttural, before a, o, and u; and generally soft, like j, before e, i, or y: thus the syllables, ga, ge, gi, go, gu, gy, are pronounced ga, je, ji, go, gu, jy.

4. Correct the division of the following words of five syllables: "a-bo-mi-na-ble, a-po-the-ca-ry, con-sid-e-ra-ble, ex-pla-na-to-ry, pre-pa-ra-to-ry;a-ca-de-mi-cal, cu-ri-o-si-ty, ge-o-gra-phi-cal, ma-nu-fac-to-ry, sa-tis-fac-to-ry, me-ri-to-ri-ous;cha-rac-te-ris-tic, e-pi-gram-ma-tic, ex-pe-ri-ment-al, po-ly-syl-la-ble, con-sid-e-ra-tion.

Words ending in ce or ge, retain the e before able or ous, to preserve the soft sounds of c and g: as, trace, traceable; change, changeable; outrage, outrageous.

Hence, he proposes to write peacible for peaceable, tracible for traceable, changible for changeable, managible for manageable; and so for all the rest that come from words ending in ce or ge.

1. Correct Bolles, in the division of the following words: "Del-ia, Jul-ia, Lyd-ia, heigh-ten, pat-ron, ad-roit, worth-y, fath-er, fath-er-ly, mar-chi-o-ness, i-dent-ic-al, out-ra-ge-ous, ob-nox-i-ous, pro-di-gi-ous, tre-mend-ous, ob-liv-i-on, pe-cul-i-ar."Revised Spelling-Book: New London, 1831.

Correct Marshall, in the division of the following words: "Trench-er, trunch-eon, dros-sy, glos-sy, glas-sy, gras-sy, dres-ses, pres-ses, cal-ling, chan-ging, en-chan-ging, con-ver-sing, mois-ture, join-ture, qua-drant, qua-drate, trans-gres-sor, dis-es-teem.

Correct Marshall, in the division of the following words: "Trench-er, trunch-eon, dros-sy, glos-sy, glas-sy, gras-sy, dres-ses, pres-ses, cal-ling, chan-ging, en-chan-ging, con-ver-sing, mois-ture, join-ture, qua-drant, qua-drate, trans-gres-sor, dis-es-teem.

The terminations which always make the regular plural in es, with increase of syllables, are twelve; namely, ce, ge, ch soft, che soft, sh, ss, s, se, x, xe, z, and ze: as in face, faces; age, ages; torch, torches; niche, niches; dish, dishes; kiss, kisses; rebus, rebuses; lens, lenses; chaise, chaises; corpse, corpses; nurse, nurses; box, boxes; axe, axes; phiz, phizzes; maze, mazes.

"Second person, Plural; Nom. Ge, ye; Gen. Eower, of ye; Dat.

Eala ge, O ye; Abl.

The principal figures of Syntax are five; namely, El-lip'-sis, Ple'-o-nasm, Syl-lep'-sis, En-al'-la-ge, and Hy-per'-ba-ton.

4. Correction of Murray, in words of five syllables: a-bom-i-na-ble, a-poth-e-ca-ry, con-sid-er-a-ble, ex-plan-a-to-ry, pre-par-a-to-ry; ac-a-dem-i-cal, cu-ri-os-i-ty, ge-o-graph-i-cal, man-u-fac-tor-y, sat-is-fac-tor-y, mer-i-to-ri-ous;char-ac-ter-is-tic, ep-i-gram-mat-ic, ex-per-i-ment-al, pol-y-syl-la-ble, con-sid-er-a-tion.

2. Correction of Webster, by Rule 2d: o-yer, fo-li-o, ge-ni-al, ge-ni-us, ju-ni-or, sa-ti-ate, vi-ti-ate;am-bro-si-a, cha-me-le-on, par-he-li-on, con-ve-ni-ent, in-ge-ni-ous, om-nis-ci-ence, pe-cu-li-ar, so-ci-a-ble, par-ti-al-i-ty, pe-cu-ni-a-ry;an-nun-ci-ate, e-nun-ci-ate, ap-pre-ci-ate, as-so-ci-ate, ex-pa-ti-ate, in-gra-ti-ate, in-i-ti-ate, li-cen-ti-ate, ne-go-ti-ate, no-vi-ti-ate, of-fi-ci-ate, pro-pi-ti-ate, sub-stan-ti-ate.

2. Correction of Webster, by Rule 2d: o-yer, fo-li-o, ge-ni-al, ge-ni-us, ju-ni-or, sa-ti-ate, vi-ti-ate;am-bro-si-a, cha-me-le-on, par-he-li-on, con-ve-ni-ent, in-ge-ni-ous, om-nis-ci-ence, pe-cu-li-ar, so-ci-a-ble, par-ti-al-i-ty, pe-cu-ni-a-ry;an-nun-ci-ate, e-nun-ci-ate, ap-pre-ci-ate, as-so-ci-ate, ex-pa-ti-ate, in-gra-ti-ate, in-i-ti-ate, li-cen-ti-ate, ne-go-ti-ate, no-vi-ti-ate, of-fi-ci-ate, pro-pi-ti-ate, sub-stan-ti-ate.

2. Correction of Webster, by Rule 2d: o-yer, fo-li-o, ge-ni-al, ge-ni-us, ju-ni-or, sa-ti-ate, vi-ti-ate;am-bro-si-a, cha-me-le-on, par-he-li-on, con-ve-ni-ent, in-ge-ni-ous, om-nis-ci-ence, pe-cu-li-ar, so-ci-a-ble, par-ti-al-i-ty, pe-cu-ni-a-ry;an-nun-ci-ate, e-nun-ci-ate, ap-pre-ci-ate, as-so-ci-ate, ex-pa-ti-ate, in-gra-ti-ate, in-i-ti-ate, li-cen-ti-ate, ne-go-ti-ate, no-vi-ti-ate, of-fi-ci-ate, pro-pi-ti-ate, sub-stan-ti-ate.

"Second person, Plural: Nom. Ge, ye; Gen. Eower, of you; Dat.

Eow, you; Voc Eala ge, O ye; Abl.

Thu, Thin, The or Ge Eower, Eow or Thec; Eowie.

THOU, thoue, thow, thowe, thu, tou, to, tu;THY or THINE, thi, thyne, thyn, thin;THEE, the, theh, thec;YE, yee, yhe, ze, zee, ge, ghe;YOUR or YOURS, youre, zour, hure, goure, yer, yower, yowyer, yorn, yourn, youre, eower;You, youe, yow, gou, zou, ou, iu, iuh, eow, iow, geow, eowih, eowic, iowih.

AMONG, mixed with, is probably an abbreviation of amongst; and AMONGST, according to Tooke, is from a and mongst, or the older "Ge-meneged," Saxon for "mixed, mingled.

It may be so in some cases; but with the participles, it is sometimes a contraction of the Saxon prefix ge, and sometimes perhaps of the Celtic ag."Improved Gram., p. 175.

A, forsooth, is a contraction of ge!

The Anglo-Saxon verb lufian, or lufigean, to love, appears to have been inflected with the several pronouns thus: Ic lufige, Thu lufast, He lufath, We lufiath, Ge lufiath, Hi lufiath.

Scarcely a hundred shots were returned and, by the time a couple of thousand rounds had been fired (less than three minutes), and Colonel Boss-Ellison had cried "Ch-a-a-a-r-ge" there was but little to charge and not much for the bayonet to do.

If it recalls the poets of Deism, it recalls no less one of the most ancient of all metaphysical poems, the poem of Parmenides on Being: [Greek: pos d' an epeit apoloito pelon, pos d' an ke genoito; ei ge genoit, ouk est', oud ei pote mellei esesthai.

Perhaps a mistake in the MS. for ge, i.e. go.

Believing that the procreative and productive powers of nature might be conceived to exist in the same individual, they made the older of their deities hermaphrodite, and used the term [Greek: a)r)r(enothe/lys], or man-virgin, to denote the union of the two sexes in the same divine person.[80] Thus, in one of the Orphic Hymns, we find this line: [Greek: Zey\s a)/rsên ge/neto, Zey\s a)/mbrotos e)/Pleto ny/mphê

Mais pour ce que plusieurs ayment et endendent mîeulx romans [le français] que latin, l'ai-ge [je l'ai] mis en Romans, affin que chascun l'entende, et que les seigneurs et les chevaliers et aultres nobles hommes qui ne scèvent point de latin,

Steele [Greek: Ouch ara soi ge patàer aen ippóra Paeleùs Oudè Thétis máetaer, glaukàe d étikte thálassa Pétrai t aelíbatoi, hóti toi nóos estìn apaenàes.

THE PAUPERS I. [Greek: ou men gar tou ge kreisson kai areion, ae hoth homophroneonte noaemasin oikon echaeton anaer aede gunae.]

miss whom?" "The ge-general!"

GAIA or GE, in the Greek mythology the primeval goddess of the earth, the alma mater of living things, both in heaven and on earth, called subsequently Demeter, i. e. Gemeter, Earth-mother.

They are either drilled, broad-cast sown, or put in by the dibble, which is considered not only the most eligible mode but in ge-neral affording the best crops.

This he gave with exquisite modulation, dwelling upon the refrain at the end of each stanza, "Juchhé, Juchhé, Juchheise, heise, he, so ging der Fiedelbogen!"