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241 examples of  huck  in sentences

241 examples of huck in sentences

Old Hucks seemed surprised, and a curious expression showed for an instant through his smile.

If the proof must be accepted that Hucks had miserly instincts, had not Beth accidentally stumbled upon a solution of the whole mystery?

"No; when Joe an' Hucks ransacked the house arter the Cap'n's death they couldn't find a dollar.

James Vernon, Robert Hucks, and George Heathcote, Esquires, paid into the Bank (the treasury for this use) ยฃ200 each for the charity, which was conducted by the following gentlemen as trustees: Anthony Earl of Shaftesbury, Francis Eyles, Esq.

Robert Hucks, Esq.

I have hired Satan for a servant, and a God called to tell me how much he liked Huck Finn.

KREIG, MILDRED V. Huck towel patterns.

SEE Kraushaar, R. W. KRIEG, MILDRED V. Huck towel patterns.

SEE Welchons, A. M. <pb id='179.png' /> KRIEG, MILDRED V. Huck towel patterns.

Huck towel patterns; pattern 1-3 direction sheet.

KREIG, MILDRED V. Huck towel patterns.

SEE Kraushaar, R. W. KRIEG, MILDRED V. Huck towel patterns.

SEE Welchons, A. M. <pb id='179.png' /> KRIEG, MILDRED V. Huck towel patterns.

Huck towel patterns; pattern 1-3 direction sheet.

HUCKS TAKES A HAND VIII FLIGHT IX FREEDOM X THE FOUR DIAMONDS.

The store and yard of Mr. Christopher Hucks stood at the head of the basin, within a stone's-throw of the Weigh Dock, and but two doors away from the Canal Company's office.

"If, my friend, you allude to Mr. Christopher Hucks, he is not setting up in any new line, but pursuing a fell career on principles which (I am credibly informed) are habitual to him, and for which I can only hope he will be sorry when he is dead.

The food, sir, of Mr. Christopher Hucks is still the bread of destitution; his drink, the tears of widows; and the groans of the temporarily embarrassed supply the music of his unhallowed feast.

"Mr. Christopher Hucks" began the stranger with slow emphasis, dropping a peeled potato into the bucket and lifting a hand with an open clasp-knife towards heaven.

He had left care behind him in Mr. Hucks's yard, and so much of noble melancholy as he kept (for the sake of artistic effect) took a tincture from the sunset bronzing the smoke-laden sky and gilding the unlovely waterway.

Oh, back to Hucks'sChristopher Hucks, Anchor Wharf, Canal End Basin.

"Can you inform me," asked a high clerical voice, "where I can find Mr. Christopher Hucks?"

"Mr. Hucks, sir?"

she asked, as the stranger, swinging his lantern, marched straight up to Mr. Hucks's door.

HUCKS TAKES A HAND.

Let Mr. Christopher Hucks introduce himself in his own customary way, that is, by presenting his card of business:

NOTE THE ADDRESS | | | Mr. Hucks, a widower, would have to be content in death with a shorter epitaph.

Yet though many had occasion to curse Mr. Hucks, few could bring themselves to hate him.

For the rest, Mr. Hucks had turned sixty, but without losing his hair, which in colour and habit resembled a badger's; and although he had lived inland all his life, carried about with him in his dress, his gait, his speech an indefinable suggestion of a nautical past.

But Mr. Hucks had reduced its habitable space to some eight feet by six, and by the following process.

By this process Mr. Hucks kept his Counting House replete, and even crowded, with chattels, some of which are reckoned among the necessaries of life, while otherssuch as an accordion, a rain-gauge, and a case of stuffed humming-birdsrank rather with its superfluities.

Of others again you wondered how on earth they had been taken in Mr. Hucks's drag-net.

When the collection impinged upon Mr. Hucks so that he could not shave without knocking his elbow, he would hold an auction, and effect a partial clearance; and this would happen about once in four years.

Indeed, the bulk of the exhibits in Mr. Hucks's museum could legally have been recovered from him under writ of replevy.

"Eh? Good evenin'," said Mr. Hucks, but without heartiness.

Shall I make out the receipt?" "You don't seriously expect me, Mr. Hucks, to pay for your coals on the same day you deliver them" "No," Mr. Hucks agreed, "I didn' expect it; but I looked for ye to pay up the last account before I sent any more on credit.

Shall I make out the receipt?" "You don't seriously expect me, Mr. Hucks, to pay for your coals on the same day you deliver them" "No," Mr. Hucks agreed, "I didn' expect it; but I looked for ye to pay up the last account before I sent any more on credit.

" "Your manner is offensive, Mr. Hucks, but for the moment I must overlook it.

" "Charges?" repeated Mr. Hucks.

Publicity in these matters, as no doubt you can understand" Mr. Hucks nodded.

and then the publiceven the charitable publictake up some groundless suspicion" "Puts two and two together," agreed Mr. Hucks, still nodding, "and then the fat's in the fire.

I don't collect orphans, for my part," said Mr. Hucks with a glance around.

" "He might," conceded Mr. Hucks guardedly, "and he mightn't; and then again he might be more able than willin'.

" "Must I remind you, Mr. Hucks, that a person who abets or connives at the sort of thing we are discussing is likely to find himself in trouble? or that even a refusal of information may be awkwardly construed?" "Now see here, Glasson"Mr.

Hucks filled his pipe, and having lit it, leaned both elbows on the table and stared across at his visitor "don't you ride the high horse with me.

" "No it ain't," said Mr. Hucks with brutal candour.

So I conclude," Mr. Hucks wound up, "there's money in this somewhere.

"I will be frank with you, Mr. Hucks," he said at length.

So far, Mr. Hucks, the business does not look promising.

"Eh? Was there more than one?" queried Mr. Hucks, sharp as a knife.

" "I follow you this far," said Mr. Hucks, ruminating.

" Mr. Hucks said it thoughtfully, but his mind was not working with his speech.

Mr. Hucks decided to have a talk with Sam before committing himself.

Mr. Hucks sat upright and stared.

"I am not suggesting" "No, dammeyou 'd better not!" breathed Mr. Hucks.

Mortimer!" ejaculated Mr. Hucks, but inwardly.

Mr. Hucks rose from his chair.

"Mine is, anyway," Mr. Hucks retorted.

and with that someone within the van uttered a cry, as a dark object sprang out over the flap, hurtled past Mr. Hucks, and hurled itself across the court towards the gate.

"'E'll kill 'im!" As Mr. Hucks recovered his balance and stared in at the caravan doorway, now wide open, from the darkness beyond the gate came a cry and a fierce guttural barkthe two blent together.

Mr. Hucks ran.

At the mention of Mr. Hucks he pressed a palm dramatically to his forehead; and now, withdrawing it, he handed her the two slips of paper with great politeness.

"Consequently," perorated Mr. Mortimer, "I conceive my personal obligations to Mr. Hucks to be satisfied; practically satisfied, even in law; as keen men of business, and allowing for contingencies, satisfied abundantly.

Something will depend on Mr. Hucks; but from the child's account of him, I build great hopes on Mr. Hucks. . . .

Something will depend on Mr. Hucks; but from the child's account of him, I build great hopes on Mr. Hucks. . . .

LITANY Mr. Hucks sat in his counting-house, counting out his moneyor so much of it as he had collected from his tenantry on his Saturday rounds.

Mr. Hucks whistled to himself softly, but out of tunesure sign that he was in a good humouras he closed the neck of his money-bag and tied the string with a neat knot.

What gave Mr. Hucks pause was, first, the brusqueness of her entry, and next, the high clear tone of her accost.

"Mr. Christopher Hucks?"

" "Me either," murmured Mr. Hucks regretfully.

" "Whoever told you that" began Mr. Hucks.

" Mr. Hucks whistled softly to himself.

" Mr. Hucks nodded, but would not commit himself.

Mr. Hucks interrupted.

Mr. Hucks nodded.

"And him a barta bloomin' bartwhat the Tichborne chap used to call a bart of the B.K.!" Mr. Hucks stared at his visitor with rounded eyes, drew a long breath, puffed out his cheeks and emitted it, and wound up by removing his hat and laying it on the ledge of the desk.

" "Aye," said Mr. Hucks, after slowly examining the telegram and the office stamp.

"Well," said Mr. Hucks slowly, after another perusal of the telegram, "I don't conclude much from it; but from my knowledge of the gal-child, I jolly well conclude that they're no more drowned than you or me.

But," persisted Mr. Hucks doggedly, "she's there if she's alive.

Miss Sally considered for a full minutefor two minutes, Mr. Hucks watching her face from under his shaggy eyebrows.

they may be starving to death there at this moment!" Mr. Hucks kept his composure.

" "Mr. Hucks," said Miss Sally after a pause, "you are a remarkable man.

" "Well," said Mr. Hucks, "it seems likely I've helped, after all.

It goes by nomination, and I'm not a subscriber," said Mr. Hucks with a grin, which Miss Sally ignored.

" "That's an idea, though," said Mr. Hucks rising.

He's the man for our job," explained Mr. Hucks, returning to the counting-house; "and maybe you'll like to make his acquaintance, too, after what you've 'eard.

"What for, if it's not makin' too bold?" "The lady here," explained Mr. Hucks, "is a friend of two children that broke out of 'Oly Innocents t'other dayas it

" "Well," struck in Mr. Hucks, while Sam scratched his head over this, "I suggest the conspiracy may just as well get going at once.

Satisfied of this, he lit his pipe and stood for a minute puffing at it, and staring, now at the stagnant canal water, now after the retreating figures of Miss Sally and Mr. Hucks, as without a backward look they passed down the towpath to the Iron Bridge.

At the bridge they turned, as Tilda had turned, to the left, and came, as Tilda had come, to the Orphanage gate with its box labelled, "For Voluntary Donations." Mr. Hucks rang the bell; and after a minute or so Mrs. Huggins, slatternly as ever, opened the front door and came shuffling down the pathway.

And what might you be wantin', Mr. 'Ucks?" "Nineteen pound ten," Mr. Hucks answered tersely.

Mr. Hucks, as she opened, planted his bulk against the gate, pushing it back and at the same time making way for Miss Sally to follow him.

she gasped, shooting a venomous look at Mr. Hucks.

Mr. Hucks brought up the rear.

"Mr. Hucks, lend me your stick, if you please.

You, Mr. Hucks, take me upstairs; I'll explore this den from garret to basement, though it cost my stomach all that by the smell I judge it will.

"You see that they're stowed," she advised Mr. Hucks shortly, as they helped the dazed children to alight.

No, I have no right to be sure, except that I rely on the girland on Hucks.

(You ought to know Hucks, by the way; he is a warrior.)

That's worrying me, I confess; for although Hucks is positive the girl would not start for Holmness without provisions and on my reading of her, he's rightthis is Tuesday, and they have been missing ever since Saturday night, or Sunday morning at latest.