Inspirassion

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2264 examples of  legion  in sentences

2264 examples of legion in sentences

Its troops are legion, marching from the far distances of the past, and extending out to the far confines of the eternal years.

But aside from these personal standpoints which are legion there is an immutable Law, to which intelligence is conforming all action and thoughtthe Law of Individualitythe Law recognized and expressed by Confucius and Jesus in negative and positive forms of the "golden rule"; "Do not unto others what ye would not they should do unto you.

They knew that Lepidus, being on the eve of departure for his province of Narbonnese Gaul, had a legion encamped on the island of the Tiber:

They made their entrance severally on three successive days, each attended by a legion.

By all that I have done, The Varian bones that day by day Lie whitening in the sun, The legion's trampled panoply, The eagle's shatter'd wing I would not be for earth or sky

Well, it was here the Seventh Legion charged: here, indeed, we stand upon the very battlefield which saw the birth of civilisation in our island.

Much time was thus wasted until the soldiers of the Seventh Legion, having formed a testudo and thrown up a rampart against the British fort, took it, and drove the Britons out of the woods, receiving in return a few, though only a few, wounds.

Garibaldi, who had organized his legion at Rieti, was elected member of the Constituent Assembly, and on February 7th put in his appearance and in language more soldierlike than parliamentary urged the immediate proclamation of the republic.

" Little did they imagine, when they kept aloof from the legion, that before three months were over their young hero chief would resign his command of them to assume the delicate post of head of Garibaldi's staff.

To his original legion were added some of the finest and bravest of the Lombard volunteers, who had learned his worth "after the armistice"; while boys from ten to fourteen, who were his pride and delight, formed his "band of hope.

To onlookers this legion, composed at first of but one thousand men, seemed a wild, unruly set; but this was not the case.

And, in fact, a Neapolitan army, with the King at their head, had crossed the Roman frontier, and had taken up positions at Albano and Frascati, whence Garibaldi was sent to oust them, the Lombard brigade being added to his legion.

I shall take eight hundred of the legion, and to-morrow shall send them to change their shirts [i.e., doff their 'red' for 'gray'].

I have begged General Garibaldi to return to San Pancrazio, so as not to deprive that post at this moment of his legion and his efficacious power.

The hardy physique and stern nature of the Romans, exercised and controlled by their organizing genius, evolved the Roman legion, which learned to resist the impetuous assaults of the elephants of the East, the phalanx of the Greeks, and the Teutonic barbarians.

He had an intense esprit de corps; he was bound up in the glory of his legion.

The Roman legion was a most perfect organization, a great mechanical force, and could sustain furious attacks after vigor, patriotism, and public spirit had fled.

The legion is coeval with the foundation of Rome, but the number of the troops of which it was composed varied at different periods.

Claudius incorporated with the legion the vanquished Goths, and after him the barbarians filled up the ranks on account of the degeneracy of the times.

In the early age of the republic the legion was disbanded as soon as the special service was performed, and was in all essential respects a militia.

The main dependence of the legion was on the infantry, which wore heavy armor consisting of helmet, breastplate, greaves on the right leg, and on the left arm a buckler, four feet in length and two and a half in width.

The legion was drawn up eight deep, and three feet intervened between rank and file, which disposition gave great activity, and made it superior to the Macedonian phalanx, the strength of which depended on sixteen ranks of long pikes wedged together.

The cavalry attached to each legion consisted of three hundred men, who originally were selected from the leading men in the State.

To each legion was attached also a train of ten military engines of the largest size, and fifty-five of the smaller,all of which discharged stones and darts with great effect.

In the time of the empire, when the legion was modified, the infantry wore cuirasses and helmets, and carried a sword and dagger.

The chief officers of the legion were the Tribunes; and originally there was one in each legion from the three tribes,the Ramnes, Luceres, and Tities.

The chief officers of the legion were the Tribunes; and originally there was one in each legion from the three tribes,the Ramnes, Luceres, and Tities.

In the time of Polybius the number in each legion was six.

Their authority extended equally over the whole legion; but to prevent confusion, it was the custom for them to divide into three sections of two, and each pair undertook the routine duties for two months out of six; they nominated the centurions, and assigned each to the company to which he belonged.

Next in rank to the tribunes, who corresponded to the rank of brigadiers and colonels in our times, were the Centurions, of whom there were sixty in each legion,men who were more remarkable for calmness and sagacity than for courage and daring valor; men who would keep their posts at all hazards.

To his charge was intrusted the eagle of the legion.

In the Roman legion there was nevertheless a regular gradation of rank, although there were but few distinct offices.

The gradation was determined not by length of service, but for merit alone, of which the tribunes were the sole judges; hence the tribune in a Roman legion had more power than that of a modern colonel.

There was a change in the constitution and disposition of the legion after the time of Marius, until the fall of the republic.

Our notice of the Roman legion would be incomplete without some description of the camp in which the soldier virtually lived.

But that, if no one else should follow, yet he would go with only the tenth legion, of which he had no misgivings, and it should be his praetorian cohort.

"This legion Caesar had both greatly favoured, and in it, on account of its valour, placed the greatest confidence.

XLI.-Upon the delivery of this speech, the minds of all were changed in a surprising, manner, and the highest ardour and eagerness for prosecuting the war were engendered; and the tenth legion was the first to return thanks to him, through their military tribunes, for his having expressed this most favourable opinion of them; and assured him that they were quite ready to prosecute the war.

For though he saw that an engagement with the cavalry would be without any danger to his chosen legion, yet he did not think proper to engage, lest, after the enemy were routed, it might be said that they had been ensnared by him under the sanction of a conference.

XXXIV.At the same time he was informed by P. Crassus, whom he had sent with one legion against the Veneti, the Unelli, the Osismii, the Curiosolitae, the Sesuvii, the Aulerci, and the Rhedones, which are maritime states, and touch upon the [Atlantic] ocean, that all these nations were brought under the dominion and power of the Roman people.

BOOK III I.When Caesar was setting out for Italy, he sent Servius Galba with the twelfth legion and part of the cavalry against the Nantuates, the Veragri, and Seduni, who extend from the territories of the Allobroges, and the lake of Geneva, and the river Rhone to the top of the Alps.

He permitted him, if he thought it necessary, to station the legion in these places, for the purpose of wintering.

It had happened for several reasons that the Gauls suddenly formed the design of renewing the war and cutting off that legion.

The occasion of that war was this: P. Crassus, a young man, had taken up his winter quarters with the seventh legion among the Andes, who border upon the [Atlantic] ocean.

He, however, did say that he did not fear the I.W.W., but was afraid of violence by the American Legion.

Also the presence of the American Legion in large numbers in court.

Tullus stationed his own men opposite the Veientine foe; the Albans he posted to face the legion of the Fidenates.

But by far the most celebrated event of the war took place in a great victory over the Quadi which he won in A.D. 174, and which was attributed by the Christians to what is known as the "Miracle of the Thundering Legion.

The Christians regarded the event not as providential but as miraculous, and attributed it to the prayers of their brethren in a legion which, from this circumstance, received the name of the "Thundering Legion."

The Christians regarded the event not as providential but as miraculous, and attributed it to the prayers of their brethren in a legion which, from this circumstance, received the name of the "Thundering Legion."

In 1870 he was offered the cross of the Legion of Honour, and refused it, arrogantly declaring that he would have none of a distinction given to tradesmen and ministers.

Nero organized the First legion, called the Italian, and now wintering in Lower Moesia; Galba, the First legion, called Adiutrix, in Lower Pannonia, and the Seventh (Gemina), which is in Spain; Vespasian, the Second, Adiutrix, in Lower Pannonia, and the Fourth (the Flavian) in Syria; Domitian, the First (Minervia), in Lower Germany; Trajan, the Second (the Egyptian), and the Thirtieth (Germanic), which he also named after himself.

Nero organized the First legion, called the Italian, and now wintering in Lower Moesia; Galba, the First legion, called Adiutrix, in Lower Pannonia, and the Seventh (Gemina), which is in Spain; Vespasian, the Second, Adiutrix, in Lower Pannonia, and the Fourth (the Flavian) in Syria; Domitian, the First (Minervia), in Lower Germany; Trajan, the Second (the Egyptian), and the Thirtieth (Germanic), which he also named after himself.

He cared so much that he almost threw his horse off his feet by the abrupt turn he gave him, and back down the pike he flew as if a legion of squires were after him.

He stopped outside an American Legion hall and walked into a dimly lit bar.

Now history is akin to this side of writing, in which the authors relate with elegance, and often describe a legion, or a battle, and also addresses and exhortations are intermingled, but in them something connected and fluent is required, and not this compressed and vehement sort of speaking.

(Before Charleston in 1779.)Scarcely waiting till the enemy had crossed the ferry, Pulaski sallied out with his legion and a few mounted volunteers, and made an assault upon the advanced parties.

That man is a legion of devils to me!

It stupidly never occurred to me to ask him whether any provision was made in case of a quiet little fire developing itself during their absence, for their number was legion, and as active, daring, orderly-looking fellows as ever I set eyes upon.

Their work consists in endeavouring to force all members who purpose presenting public or private bills to employ them, which, of course, involves a "consideration;" and, as their name is "Legion," and their motto on this point "unanimity," they are enabled, owing to their influence with the members, to throw the greatest possible obstruction in the way of most bills which are not passed through their "greased palms."

The Hospital of the Invalides, in Paris, has sheltered, for half a century, a fine specimen of a female soldier, "Lieutenant Madame Bulan," now eighty-three years old, decorated by Napoleon's own hand with the cross of the Legion of Honor, and credited on the hospital books with "seven years' service,seven campaigns, three wounds,several times distinguished, especially in Corsica, in defending a fort against the English."

And the blue night comes with stars in her tresses, and out of those stars a legion of angels float softly; their white feet hang out of the blown folds, their wings are pointed to the stars.

Memoirs of the Foreign Legion, by M. M.; with an introd.

NEWSOM, E. L. They come hard-boiled in the Legion.

They come hard-boiled in the Legion.

Napoleon's legion.

(In The American Legion monthly, Jan. 1931)

Gunman's legion.

(In American Legion monthly, Feb. 1932)

SEE Legion airs.

SEE Nowlan, Phil. Skyroads with Clipper Williams of the flying legion.

Free bullets for the quick-grave legion.

KAY, KATHRYN, pseud. SEE Pratt, Kathryn W. KEATON, RUSSELL. Skyroads with Clipper Williams of the flying legion.

(In American Legion magazine, Aug. 1944)

Port o'missing men: strange tales of the Foreign Legion.

Sous le drapeau de la legion etrangire.

(In American Legion magazine, Dec. 1950) ยฉ 17Nov50; B274639.

ยฉ on new matter; 2Mar25, A822299. R101887, 31Oct52, Benziger Bros., inc. (PWH) LAWRENCE, DAVID HERBERT Memoirs of the Foreign Legion.

Memoirs of the Foreign Legion, by M. M.; with an introd.

My name is legion.

(In The American legion monthly, Feb.-Sept.

SEE Legion airs.

SEE Legion airs.

The red legion.

(In American Legion magazine, Aug. 1937)

(In American Legion monthly, Feb. 1937)

Lawless legion, by Will Ermine (Harry Sinclair Drago)

Port o'missing men: strange tales of the Foreign Legion.

But, in this degenerate age, fraud and a legion of ills infecting the world, no virtue can be safe, no honour be secure; while wanton desires, diffused into the hearts of men, corrupt the strictest watches and the closest retreats, which, though as intricate, and unknown as the labyrinth of Crete, are no security for chastity.

As for the individual adventures, their name was legion.

When he took command of the armyor "Legion," as he preferred to call itthe one stipulation he made was that the campaign should not begin until his ranks were full and his men thoroughly disciplined.

His "legion" of regular troops, was over two thousand strong.

If there be any refusal to follow me, I shall march with only the tenth legion, of which I have no doubt; that shall be my praetorian cohort.

The eighth legion, drawn on one day to make an imprudent assault, was repulsed, and lost forty-six of its bravest centurions.

He even formed, almost entirely of Gauls, a special legion called Alauda (lark), because it bore on the helmets a lark with outspread wings, the symbol of wakefulness.

This man had been the groom of the Honourable George Hanger, a major in the British Legion during the war.

Its conduct so roused Swift that his indignation found expression in one of his bitterest and most terrible poetical satires"The Legion Club"a satire so bitter and so scathing that reading it now, after the lapse of more than a century and a half, one shudders at its invective"a blasting flood of filth and vitriol, out of some hellish fountain," Mr. Churton Collins calls it.

I wonder that about this time, or say between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, too late for the morning papers and too early for the evening ones, there is not a general explosion heard up and down the street, scattering a legion of antiquated and house-bred notions and whims to the four winds for an airing,and so the evil cure itself.

1 What gives us that fantastic fit, That all our judgment and our wit To vulgar custom we submit? 2 Treason, theft, murder, and all the rest Of that foul legion we so detest, Are in their proper names express'd.

PHALANX, among the Greeks a body of heavy infantry armed with long spears and short swords, standing in line close behind one another, generally 8 men deep, the Macedonian being as much as 16; its movements were too heavy, and it was dashed in pieces before the legions of Rome to its extinction; it was superseded by the Roman legion.