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317 examples of  letty  in sentences

317 examples of letty in sentences

" "You certainly shall have a preacher-bonnet, Letty.

Letty said truly that Jo had a gift of speech; and she, having said her say about the hair, dismissed the matter, with no uneasy recurring to it, and took up a book from the table, declaring she was tired of her seam; she always was tired of sewing!

Why don't you unfold Letty's fate?

You may tell Letty's fortune, or mine, if you will; but my power is gone.

"Look at Letty," said I, succeeding at last in a laugh.

And really Letty was comical to look at; she was regarding Josephine and me with her eyes wide open like two blue larkspur flowers, her little red lips apart, and her whole pretty surface face quite full of astonishment.

"Wasn't that a nice little tableau, Letty?" said Josephine, with preternatural coolness.

" Letty rubbed her left eye a little, as if to see whether she was sleepy or not, and looked grave; for me, the laugh came easily enough now.

"Shall I tell your fortune now, Letty?

" "No, Letty, she shall not vex your head with nonsense.

" Letty turned pale with rage.

Friend Allis will break her heart over Letty; but I'd bet you a pack of gloves, that in three years you'll see that juvenile Quakeress in a scarlet satin hat and feather, with a blue shawl, and green dress, on the arm of a fast young man with black hair, and a cigar in his mouth.

Letty was an orphan, and lived with her cousin, Friend Allis.

The cigar seemed wonderful to the half-frightened, all-amazed child; but who ever sees a fast young man without a cigar?" "I am afraid it is Henry Malden," said I, meditatively; "he is all you describe, but he is also radically bad; besides, having been in the Mexican war, he will have the prestige of a hero to Letty.

If you want Letty to marry him, just judiciously oppose it.

" "Then Letty must stay here and bide her time.

As we walked together toward the landing of the steamer, Letty Allis emerged from a green lane to say good-bye, and down its vista I discerned the handsome, lazy person of Henry Malden, but I did not inform Letty of my discovery.

On the contrary, he was more dissipated than ever; and whenever he came home, the welcome that waited for him was one little calculated to make home pleasant; for Letty's quick temper blazed up in reproach and reviling that drew out worse recrimination; and even the little, wailing, feeble baby, that filled Letty's arms and consoled her in his absence, was only further cause of strife between her and her husband.

On the contrary, he was more dissipated than ever; and whenever he came home, the welcome that waited for him was one little calculated to make home pleasant; for Letty's quick temper blazed up in reproach and reviling that drew out worse recrimination; and even the little, wailing, feeble baby, that filled Letty's arms and consoled her in his absence, was only further cause of strife between her and her husband.

I had a hard task before me,to try and teach Letty that she had no right to neglect her own duties because her husband ignored his.

Sir Arthur Pinero, a character-drawer of great versatility, becomes a psychologist in some of his studies of feminine typesin Iris, in Letty, in the luckless heroine of Mid-Channel.

The cows had been milked, some by a rotund black woman named Letty, and some, much to their discomfort, by Plez himself, and it was beginning to grow dark, when an open spring wagon driven by a colored man, and with a white man on the back seat came along the road, and stopped at the gate.

"Look h'yar Letty," said the negro man, "whar ole miss?" "Dunno," said the woman.

Reckon' you don' 'member Letty?"

"Yes I do," said the gentleman, shaking hands with her; "but the Letty I remember was a rather slim young woman.

" "Dat's so," said Letty, with a respectful laugh, 'but, shuh

"You, Letty, can't you go look her up?" Now was heard the voice of Plez, who meekly emerged from the shade of Letty.

"You, Letty, can't you go look her up?" Now was heard the voice of Plez, who meekly emerged from the shade of Letty.

ejaculated Letty.

" "'Tain't easy to tell whar she done gone from dat," said Letty.

" The gentleman took a seat in the parlor where Letty had preceded him with a lamp.

"But if she's about to die, what does she want with a crazy quilt?" "Dat's fur she shroud," said Letty.

exclaimed Master Junius, "two hundred?" "Yes, sah," answered Letty.

" In about half an hour Uncle Isham came into the kitchen, his appearance indicating that he had had a hurried walk, and told Letty that she had better give Master Junius his supper without waiting any longer for her mistress.

He told Uncle Isham he was going away to stay away; and he said the same thing to Letty, and to Plez, and to two colored women of the neighborhood whom he happened to see.

Uncle Isham took leave of him with much sadness, but did not ask him to stay; and Letty and Plez looked after him wistfully, still holding in their hands the coins he had placed there.

Uncle Isham, Letty, and the boy Plez, were very much surprised at the arrival of the lady in the carriage.

She waited for an hour or two, during which time Letty made several attempts to account for the non-appearance of her mistress, who, she said, was away on a visit, but was expected back every minute; and when supper was ready she partook of that meal alone, and after a short evening spent in reading she went to bed in the chamber which Letty prepared for her.

She waited for an hour or two, during which time Letty made several attempts to account for the non-appearance of her mistress, who, she said, was away on a visit, but was expected back every minute; and when supper was ready she partook of that meal alone, and after a short evening spent in reading she went to bed in the chamber which Letty prepared for her.

Before she retired, Letty, who had shown herself a very capable attendant, said to her: "Wot's your name, miss?

Good air, the good meals with which Letty had provided her, and a sort of sympathy which had sprung up in a very sudden way between her and everything on the place, had given brightness to her eyes.

She left home, as Letty has told me over and over, because your Master Junius came.

" Letty and her son, Plez, occupied a cabin not far from the house, while Uncle Isham lived alone in a much smaller tenement, near the barn and chicken house.

That evening he went over to Letty's, taking with him, as a burnt offering, a partially consumed and still glowing log of hickory wood from his own hearth-stone.

"Jes' lemme tell you dis h'yar, Letty," said he, after making up the fire and seating himself on a stool near by, "ef you want to see ole miss come back rarin' an' chargin', jes' you let her know dat Miss Null is gwine ter plough de clober fiel' for pickles.

" "Wot's dat fool talk?" asked Letty.

But one thing's sartin shuh, Letty, if ole miss do fin' out wot's gwine on, she'll be back h'yar in no time!

Who's she, anyway?" "Dunno," answered Letty.

" "Does you reckon she kill her ef she come back an' fin' her no kin?" asked Letty.

"Look h'yar, you Letty, I don' want to hear no sech fool talk 'bout ole miss.

" "Wid a whizz?" asked the open-eyed Letty.

An' you dunno ole miss, nohow, an' I don' want to hear no fool talk from you, Letty, 'bout her.

"Well," said Letty to herself, as she rose and approached the bed in the corner of the room, "Ise pow'ful glad dat somebody's gwine to take de key bahsket, for I nebber goes inter dat sto'-room by myse'f widout tremblin' all froo my back bone fear ole miss come back, an' fin' me dar 'lone.

" When she had reached the house, and had informed Letty where she was going, the rotund maid expressed high approbation of the visit, and offered to send Plez to show Miss Null the way.

My niece was going with her, but I called her back to attend to some housekeeping matters for me, and I think she will be kept longer than she expected, for I have just sent Letty to her to be shown how to cut out a frock.

She set down her umbrella; shouted an order to Letty to put a kettle of water on the fire; brought from her own room some flannel and two bottles of embrocation; and then stopping a moment to reflect, ordered that the office should be prepared for Mr Croft, for it would be a shame to make a gentleman, with a sprained ankle, clamber up stairs.

It was a question which his mind was totally incapable of solving, but when he reached the house, he spoke to Letty on the subject.

contemptuously exclaimed Letty, "don' you go put no 'count on dem fool notions wot Aun' Patsy got in she old head.

"I reckon," said Uncle Isham, as he looked in at Letty's cabin on his way to his own, "dat dat ar Mister Crof' aint much use to gittin'

"I tell you what it is, Letty," said Uncle Isham, when he returned to the kitchen after having carried Lawrence's supper to him, "dat ar Mister Croft in de offis is a gittin wuss an' wuss in he min', ebery day.

" "I reckin' he j'ints is healin' up," said Letty.

And then, after satisfying himself that nothing more was needed of him for the present, Isham left the room; and when he reached the kitchen, he addressed himself to its plump mistress: "Letty," said he, "when dat ar Mister Crof has got froo wid his dinner, you go an' fotch back

" "You is poh'ly to-day, Uncle Isham," said Letty.

Letty had no objections to answering questions, but much to her disappointment, Lawrence asked her none.

"Dinner will be late to-day," she said, "for I saw Letty doing her best among the Jerusalem Jumpers.

"Have you seen Letty?"

"Letty?" said Miss Annie.

"Oh, yes," she added, as if she suddenly remembered that such a person existed, "Letty was at church, and she was very active.

" At this, Annie could not help giving him a little look which would have provoked reflection in the mind of the old lady, had she not been very earnestly engaged in gazing out into the road, in the hope of seeing Letty.

He immediately went to the door, when the old lady informed him, that as Letty had not come back, and did not appear to be intending to come back, and that as none of the other servants on the place had made their appearance, he might as well come into the house, and try to satisfy his hunger on what cold food she and Mrs Null had managed to collect.

It was beginning to be dark, when Letty and Uncle Isham returned and explained why they had been so late in returning.

"And do you know," said she, "that Letty told me something, this morning, that is so funny and yet in a certain way so pathetic, that it made me laugh and cry both.

" At this, Lawrence burst out laughing, but Annie checked him and went on; "And she told Letty in church, when she saw us two come in, that she believed she could die happy now, since she had seen Miss Annie married to such a peart gentleman, and that it looked as if old miss had got over her grudge against him.

" "And didn't Letty undeceive her?" asked Lawrence.

"She gone to Howlettses, an' she done tole Aun' Letty

Letty and the law, by Faith Baldwin.

Moran of the Lady Letty. Vol.3.

Oh, yes; she wanted me to say to you that she was well-and so is that other girlwhat's her name?" "Letty Lynden?" "Oh, yesLetty Lynden.

he said, "where is Mrs. Paige?" Celia had caught the girl's hands in hers, and was searching her thin white face with anxious eyes; and Letty shook her head and looked wonderingly at Berkley.

"She is quite well," repeated Letty reassuringly; and, to Celia: "She sends her love to you and to your husband and son, and wishes to know how they are and where their regiment is stationed.

And as soon as she left the room Letty sprang to her feet and went straight to Berkley.

" "To see me, Letty?" he repeated, surprised and smiling.

I knew what you would say" "Letty!

punishment!and Casson stared at me and said: 'My Lord, Letty!

"I thought it wasbut there is no shelterno placeno place in all the earth!" "Letty," he said slowly, "if your Dr. Benton is the man I think

Come here, Letty.

And you shall not doubt it, Letty.

Now you must smile at me, Letty.

So the napkin was spread over the sheets, and pillows tucked behind Berkley; and Celia and Letty fed him, and Letty drank her coffee and thankfully ate her bacon and corn pone, telling them both, between bites, how it had been with her and with Ailsa since the great retreat set in, swamping all hospitals with the sick and wounded of an unbeaten but disheartened army, now doomed to decimation by disease.

So the napkin was spread over the sheets, and pillows tucked behind Berkley; and Celia and Letty fed him, and Letty drank her coffee and thankfully ate her bacon and corn pone, telling them both, between bites, how it had been with her and with Ailsa since the great retreat set in, swamping all hospitals with the sick and wounded of an unbeaten but disheartened army, now doomed to decimation by disease.

" Celia reddened to the ears, and her lips tightened, but she said nothing; and Letty went on, unconscious of the fiery emotions awaking in Celia's breast: "Everybody was so cheerful and happy in the hospitalall those poor sick soldiers," she said, "and everybody was beginning to plan to go home, thinking the war had nearly ended.

"Mother," he said in an awed voice, "Jimmy Lent is dead!" "What!" He looked stupidly around the room, resting his eyes on Letty and Berkley, then dropped heavily onto a chair.

Letty calmly lifted the tray from the bed and set it on a table.

Then Berkley opened the letter that Letty had brought him: "This is just a hurried line to ask you a few questions.

" Wondering, vaguely uneasy, he read and re-read this note, so unlike Ailsa, so brief, so disturbing in its direct coupling of the people in whose company he had first met Letty Lynden. . . .

Yet, on reflection, he dismissed apprehension, Ailsa was too fine a character to permit any change in her manner to humiliate Letty even if, by hazard, knowledge of the unhappy past had come to her concerning the pretty, pallid nurse of Sainte Ursula.

Letty is struck dumb with astonishment at first, but the awful change, which two years have effected, gradually dawns on her.

This is no other than "Sister Letty," dressed up in order to frighten the youth out of his wits.

Later on, Sister Letty, looking from the window, sees a grand fight going on between Master Harry and a butcher-boy, and then Harry enters with his coat off, his sleeves tucked up, explaining in a state of blazing excitement that he "had to fight that butcher-boy, because he had struck a little girl in the street.

" Letty sees that the lad has a fine nature in spite of his folly, and appeals to his heart and the nobility of his naturethis time not in vain.