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25040 example sentences with  london

25040 example sentences with london

In a communication from Mr. J. Toulmin Smith, he expresses his anxiety to procure some Indian skulls from the tribes of the Upper Lakes, to be employed in his lectures on phrenology; and, also, for the purpose of transmission to London.

The next letter I opened was from Mrs. Jameson, of London, who writes that her plan of publication is, to divide the profits with her publishers, and, as these are honest men and gentlemen, she has found that the best way.

It is an octagonal mass of rose-colored sandstone and white marble, decorated with an ingenuity of design and delicacy of execution that have never been surpassed, and is crowned by a marble dome of perfect Persian pattern, three-fourths the diameter of that of St. Paul's Cathedral of London, and almost as large as that of the Capitol at Washington.

It surpasses in beauty and strength the Kremlin at Moscow, the Tower of London, the citadel at Toledo and every other fortress I know of.

The coronation robe of Queen Alexandra of England, which is said to have been of surpassing richness and beauty, was woven and embroidered in a factory upon the Chandni Chauk, and the merchant who made it is constantly receiving orders from the different courts of Europe and from the leading dressmakers of London, Paris and Vienna.

You often see a barefooted, bare-legged peasant with his head wrapped in a Cashmere shawl that would bring a thousand dollars in a London auction-room.

For example, a young gentleman, relating his experience, declared that under the power of one of these men he attended his brother's wedding in a London church and wrote home an account of it that was so accurate in its details that his family were convinced that he had come all the way from India without letting them know and had attended it secretly.

Theatrical agents in London and elsewhere have frequently tempted them with fortunes, but they cannot be persuaded to display their gifts for gain, or violate their caste and the traditions of their profession.

The first thing which I did was to go into an open grocer's shop, which was also a post and telegraph office, with the notion, I suppose, to get a message through to London.

Thousands upon thousands of unburied dead, anticipating the more deliberate doom that comes and smokes, and rides and comes and comes, and does not fail, encumber the streets of London, Manchester, Liverpool.

* * * * * My aim was London.

Even as to whether I was going toward, or away from, London, I was not sure.

This time, when steam was up, I succeeded in uncoupling the carriages from the engine, and by the time morning broke, I was lightly gliding away over the country, whither I did not know, but making for London.

I do not know the maze into which the train took me, for very soon after leaving Canterbury it must have gone down some branch-line, and though the names were marked at stations, that hardly helped me, for of their situation relatively to London I was seldom sure.

On the fifth evening, instead of into London, I ran into Guildford. * * * * * That night, from eleven till the next day, there was a great storm over England: let me note it down.

This town of Guildford appeared to be the junction of an extraordinary number of railway-lines, and before again setting out in the afternoon, when the wind had lulled, having got an A B C guide, and a railway-map, I decided upon my line, and upon a new engine, feeling pretty sure now of making London, only thirty miles away.

I then set out, and about five o'clock was at Surbiton, near my aim; I kept on, expecting every few minutes to see the great city, till darkness fell, and still, at considerable risk, I went, as I thought, forward: but no London was there.

Here, I should say, the English were quite equal in number to the foreigners: and there were enough of both, God knows: for London must have poured many here.

I should very soon have got to London now, but, as my bad luck would have it, I met a long up-train on the metals, with not one creature in any part of it.

Nor could I now move, unless I decided to wade: for flesh was everywhere, on the roofs of trains, cramming the interval between them, on the platforms, splashing the pillars like spray, piled on trucks and lorries, a carnal quagmire; and outside, it filled the space between a great host of vehicles, carpeting all that region of London.

On arriving, therefore, at London, I made straight for the office of the Times, only stopping at a chemist's in Oxford Street for a bottle of antiseptic to hold near my nose, though, having once left the neighbourhood of Paddington, I had hardly much need of this.

* * * * * There were two houses in London to which especially I had thought to go: one in Harley Street, and one in Hanover Square: but when it came to the point, I would not; and there was a little embowered home in Yorkshire, where I was born, to which I thought to go:

What astonished me here, and, indeed, above, and everywhere, in London even, and other towns, was the incredible number of birds that strewed the ground, at some points resembling a real rain, birds of nearly every sort, including tropic specimens: so that I had to conclude that they, too, had fled before the cloud from country to country, till conquered by weariness and grief, and then by death.

And I said: 'I will burn, I will burn: I will return to London....' * * * * *

* * * * * I returned to London on the 29th of March, arriving within a hundred yards of the Northern Station one windy dark evening about eight, where I alighted, and walked to Euston Road, then eastward along it, till I came to a shop which I knew to be a jeweller's, though it was too dark to see any painted words.

The door, to my annoyance, was locked, like nearly all the shop-doors in London: I therefore went looking near the ground, and into a cart, for something heavy, very soon saw a labourer's ponderous boots, cut one from the shrivelled foot, and set to beat at the glass till it came raining; then knocked away the bottom splinters, and entered.

I flew with a shower of kicks upon the foolish thing: but that booted nothing; and this was my last attempt in that way in London, the streets being in an unsuitable condition.

All that dismal night it blew great guns: and during nearly three weeks, till London was no more, there was a storm, with hardly a lull, that seemed to behowl her destruction.

During the afternoon of my second day in London, I sought out a strong petrol motor in Holborn, overhauled and oiled it a little, and set off over Blackfriars Bridge, making for Woolwich through that other more putrid London on the south river-side.

During the afternoon of my second day in London, I sought out a strong petrol motor in Holborn, overhauled and oiled it a little, and set off over Blackfriars Bridge, making for Woolwich through that other more putrid London on the south river-side.

This time it was only the simple fact that the hands chanced to point to 3.10 P.M., the precise moment at which all the clocks of London had stoppedfor each town has its thousand weird fore-fingers, pointing, pointing still, to the moment of doom.

In London it was 3.10 on a Sunday afternoon.

But about four I threw them to the devil, having done two hundred odd, and then hummed back in the motor to London.

* * * * * During the next nine days I worked with a fever on me, and a map of London before me.

In the wine-vaults at London Docks was a vat which must certainly have contained between twenty and thirty thousand gallons: and with dancing heart I laid a train there; the tobacco-warehouse must have covered eighty acres: and there I laid a fuse.

by 11 A.M. I felt sure that a large region of north-eastern London must be in flames.

I believe that London in England was larger: but no city, surely, ever seemed so large.

She paints in water-colors, and has exhibited at the principal American exhibitions, in London, and in both Paris Salons.

<b>DUHEM, MARIE.</b> Officer of the Academy, 1895; member of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts; medal at the Paris Exposition, 1900; diploma of honor at Exposition of Women Artists, London, 1900.

" Her bust of Queen Victoria is in the Middle Temple, London; the "Faithful Shepherdess," an ideal figure, executed for the Corporation of London, is in the Mansion House.

" Her bust of Queen Victoria is in the Middle Temple, London; the "Faithful Shepherdess," an ideal figure, executed for the Corporation of London, is in the Mansion House.

A Madonna in the National Gallery in London is attributed to Margaretha van Eyck.

<b>FARNCOMB, CAROLINE.</b> Several first prizes in exhibitions in London, Toronto, Montreal, and Ottawa.

Member of Women's Art Club, London, Ontario.

van den Broeck in London, Canada, and later of William Chase in New York.

FANNY.</b> [No reply to circular.] <b>FOCCA, SIGNORA ITALIA ZANARDELLI.</b> Silver medal at Munich, 1893; diploma of gold medal at Women's Exhibition, London, 1900.

The principal works of this sculptor are a "Bacchante," now in St. Petersburg; "Najade," sold in London; "The Virgin Mother," purchased by Cavaliere Alinari of Florence; portrait of the Minister Merlo, which was ordered by the Ministry of Public Instruction.

In London, in 1888, "Tipo Napoletano," "Studio dal vero," and "Ricordi" were exhibited.

Miss French is a miniaturist and exhibited at the Royal Academy, London, in 1901, a case of her works which she was later specially invited to send to an exhibition in Liverpool, and several other exhibits.

At an open competition in the London Art Union her "Hero" won the prize.

Pupil of her father, Prince Victor of Hohenlohe, and of the Slade School, London; also of Professor Legros.

The Constitutional Club, London, has her bust of Queen Alexandra, which was seen at the Academy in 1895.

In 1899 her statue of "Peace" was more pleasing, while a hand-mirror of jade and bronze was much admired both in London and Paris, where it was seen in the Exposition of 1900.

<b>GLEICHEN, COUNTESS HELENA.</b> [No reply to circular.] <b>GLOAG, ISOBEL LILIAN.</b> Born in London, the daughter of Scotch parents.

After still further study with Raphael Collin in Paris, she returned to London and soon had her work accepted at the Royal Academy.

" <b>GRANBY, MARCHIONESS OF.</b> Replies as follows to circular: "Lady Granby has been written about by Miss Tomlinson, 20 Wigmore Street, London, W.

This sculptor studied in Paris and Florence, as well as in London, where she was a pupil of J. H. Foley, R.A.

Born in London.

She soon made illustrations for Little Folks and the London News.

Born at the last-named place, where she also made her studies in the Newcastle School of Art, and later under private masters in London.

Since 1890 she has continuously exhibited at the Academy of the Royal Institute, London, except in 1895 and 1902.

Mrs. Grey was fortunate in having the first picture she sent to London sold, and has continued to find purchasers for her exhibited works, which are now in many private collections and number about one hundred and fifty.

"The list of Mrs. Guild's works executed abroad include a painting belonging to the very beginning of her career, of still-life in oils, which was accepted and well hung at the Royal Academy in London; but it is in Berlin that she has been especially successful.

Born in London.

Miss Halse executed the reredos in St. John's Church, Notting Hill, London; a terra-cotta relief called "Earthward Board" (?) is in St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London; a relief, the "Pleiades," was purchased by the Corporation of Glasgow for the Permanent Exhibition; her restoration of the "Hermes" was placed in the British Museum beside the cast from the original.

Miss Halse executed the reredos in St. John's Church, Notting Hill, London; a terra-cotta relief called "Earthward Board" (?) is in St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London; a relief, the "Pleiades," was purchased by the Corporation of Glasgow for the Permanent Exhibition; her restoration of the "Hermes" was placed in the British Museum beside the cast from the original.

" <b>HARDING, CHARLOTTE.</b> George W. Childs gold medal at Philadelphia School of Design for Women; silver medal at Women's Exposition, London, 1900.

They have been exhibited in Paris, London, Naples, New York, Philadelphia, and Boston.

She first exhibited at Paris Salon in 1889, in London Academy in 1890, and annually sends her portraits to the Boston, New York, and Philadelphia Exhibitions.

<b>HUNTER, MARY Y.</b> Four silver medals at Royal Academy Schools Exhibitions; diploma for silver medal, Woman's International Exhibition, Earl's Court, London.

Her picture of a "Polish Woman and Children Leaving Their Home, which had been Destroyed," is in the Raczynski Collection, Berlin; "Polish Peasants Returning to the Ruins of a Burnt House," in the Lansdowne Collection, London; "A Wounded Soldier Nursed by His Betrothed," in the Gallery at Copenhagen, where is also her portrait of her husband; "An Icelandic Maiden," in the Kunsthalle, Hamburg.

Since 1871 Mrs. Jopling has been a constant exhibitor at the Royal Academy and other London exhibitions, and frequently also at the Paris Salon.

An original member of the London Academy.

After visiting Paris she went to London, where a brilliant career awaited her, not only as an artist, but in the social world as well.

Many interesting incidents in her association with London artists are related, and it is said that both Fuseli and Sir Joshua Reynolds were unsuccessful suitors for her hand.

He was a member of the Royal Academy, London, and was in full sympathy with his wife in intellectual and artistic pursuits and pleasures.

Although Angelica lived and worked so long in London and was one of the thirty-six original members of the Royal Academy, I do not think her best pictures are in the public galleries there.

Of course many of the portraits painted in London are in private collections.

She painted several portraits of herself; one is in the National Portrait Gallery, London, one at Munich, and a third in the Uffizi, Florence.

London: Routledge & Co. 4to.

Does not Mr. Henshaw come to London?

Whatever were the causes, the first consequences, as you may guess, were such a ferment in London as is seldom seen at this dead season of the year.

London, Westminster, Middlesex, seem to have no monarch but Wilkes, who is at the same time pushing for the Mayoralty of London, with hitherto a majority on the poll.

London, Westminster, Middlesex, seem to have no monarch but Wilkes, who is at the same time pushing for the Mayoralty of London, with hitherto a majority on the poll.

Next week I shall not venture to London even at noon, for the Middlesex election is to be at Brentford, where the two demagogues, Wilkes and Townshend, oppose each other; and at Richmond there is no crossing the river.

I don't know what he may do on Constantinople and Pekinbut Paris and London!

I never knew he had been in London till some time after he had undone and poisoned himself there.

my dear sir, do you think a capital as enormous as London has its nerves affected by what happens beyond the Atlantic?

SCENEA London Lawn.

There should be a special department, and the Shadowers should be of the distinguished position of Mr. MCDOUGALL of the London County Council, and the like.

In England I have to thank Messrs. Sidney Webb, Hubert Hall and George Unwin, of the London School of Economics, for reading manuscript and suggesting improvements.

The second inscription has the following signification: "As to the author or painter of this chart; he is Bartholomew Columbus of the red earth, a Genoese, who published this work at London on the 21st of February in the year 1480.

To him I owe the gaiety of temperament which has enabled me to dance through the most harsh and desert passages of my life, just as he used to make Kate and me dance along the sordid London streets as we walked home from the Princess's Theater.

When we were not in London and could not go to Lavender Sweep to see him, he wrote almost daily to us.

They were always ready to show visitors (not so numerous then as now) the sights; prattled freely to them of "my mamma," who was acting in London, and showed them the new trees which they had assisted the gardeners to plant in the wild garden, and christened after my parts.

On her 18-date tour, which includes shows in Brighton, Newport, Birmingham, Newcastle and London, Emily says: “Bring your mum and dad if you dare, and let’s have a right laugh.”

On July 3, 2010, in London, England, the tennis star was treated for a blood clot in the lungs.

“Our crop season starts from September and ends in October and we all know the adverse effect of the covid-19 pandemic which has also affected the syndication done in London and not in Ghana.

Our directory will also reveal the promo codes needed to get the discount - so make us your first stop to Shop London.

Patients were recruited through the Breast Care Program of St. Joseph’s Hospital in London, Ontario.