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54 examples of  maccabee  in sentences

54 examples of maccabee in sentences

The Ptolemies and the Antiochi for centuries fought for Gaza, whose inhabitants had a greater taste for the mart than for the sword, and when the Maccabees were carrying a victorious war through Philistia, the people of Gaza bought off Jonathan, but the Jews occupied the city itself about a century before the Christian era.

[Footnote 66: That this appellation of Maccabee was not first of all given to Judas Maccabรฆaus, nor was derived from any initial letters of the Hebrew words on his banner, Mi Kamoka Be Elim, Jehovah?

Only we may note, by the way, that the original name of these Maccabees and their posterity was Asamoneans, which was derived from Asamoneus, the great-grandfather of Mattathias, as Josephus here informs us.]

The story of the brave Maccabee was already, you may be sure, familiar to me in all its parts.

When the store outfitted Odd Fellows' Hall with new window shades he learned that the Odd Fellows shared the place with strong lodges of the Maccabees and Modern Woodmen.

In this way died one valiant Maccabee; Brutus feigned madness; prudent Solon hid His sense; and David, when he feared Gath's king.

The heroic ages of Jewish history passed away when ships navigated by Phoenician sailors brought gold from Ophir and silver from Tarshish, and did not return until the Maccabees rallied the hunted and decimated tribes of Israel against the armies of the Syrian kings.

The rule of the Maccabees,the five sons of Mattathias,lasted thirty years.

Herod, the great historic king of the Jews, though passionately in love with his wife Mariamne, sacrifices her brother Aristobulus to his suspicions, fearing that this young prince, the last of the Maccabees, may supplant him on the throne.

The contest was like that of the Maccabees against the overwhelming armies of Syria.

It is a history in sippets: the English Iliads in a nutshell: the apocryphal Parliament's book of Maccabees in single sheets.

How many myriads besides in all ages might I remember, qui sibi lethum Insontes pepperere manu, &c. Rhasis in the Maccabees is magnified for it, Samson's death approved.

More than one commentator, I find, has suspected that the Wisdom of Solomon and the second book of Maccabees were by the same author.

Not only Homer has made use of it, but we find the Jewish Hero in the Book of Maccabees, who had fought the Battels of the chosen People with so much Glory and Success, receiving in his Dream a Sword from the Hand of the Prophet Jeremiah.

"But if, like the Jews in the Maccabees, we rely upon the Lord to fight our battles, without lifting a weapon in our defence, or, like the wagoner in the fable, we content ourselves with calling on Hercules, we shall find in the end that 'Faith without Works is dead.' ...

So again in the time of the Maccabees.

of the first Book of Maccabees, will make an excellent motto for a seal.

But like a second Maccabee, "his right arm abandons him not, and his courage, inflamed by so many perils, came to his aid."

Although the historical records are by no means complete, the great crises in Israel's life are illuminated by such remarkable historical writings as the memoirs of Nehemiah, the first book of Maccabees, and the detailed histories of Josephus.

No apology or explanation is required for the use of such apocryphal writings as I Maccabees, Ben Sira, the Wisdom of Solomon, or Josephus's histories, for these are required to bridge the two centuries which intervene between the latest writings of the Old Testament and the earliest writings of the New.

I. The Character and Contents of I Maccabees.

Character and Contents of II Maccabees.

It lights up the otherwise dark period that precedes Nehemiah and enables the historian to bridge with assurance the century that intervened before the apocryphal book of I Maccabees throws its light upon the course of Israel's troubled history.

Even the comparatively late Jewish tradition reflected in the opening chapters of II Maccabees attributes to Nehemiah the re-establishment of the temple Service and the collection of the sacred writings of his race.

For the latter half he draws largely from the apocryphal book of I Maccabees and from the writings of contemporary Greek and Jewish historians.

The modern revival of interest in the apocryphal books, both in Europe and America, is tending to restore this book, in common with I Maccabees, to the position which they certainly deserve in the practical working canon of the Old Testament.

I. Character and Contents of I Maccabees.

The first book of Maccabees is in many ways the best history that has come down from ancient Israel.

The first book of Maccabees opens with a brief reference to Alexander the Great and to the Greek rulers who succeeded him.

Character and Contents of II Maccabees.

In marked contrast with I Maccabees is the second book which bears this name.

Notwithstanding all of its obvious faults, II Maccabees has preserved many important historical facts.

Where its testimony differs from that of I Maccabees, the latter in general should be followed, but its account of the events which led to the Maccabean uprising are much more detailed than those of I Maccabees, which it supplements at many important points.

Where its testimony differs from that of I Maccabees, the latter in general should be followed, but its account of the events which led to the Maccabean uprising are much more detailed than those of I Maccabees, which it supplements at many important points.

Judas, who bore the surname Maccabeus (whence the word Maccabees), soon proved himself a great military leader.

Several passages describe the destructive policies of this Syrian ruler almost as vividly as the books of Maccabees (Dan. 8:11, 12): "It (Antiochus) magnified itself even to the Prince of the Host (Jehovah), and took away from him the daily sacrifice, and cast down the place of his sanctuary, and set up the sacrilegious thing over the daily sacrifice, and cast down truth to the ground, and did it and prospered.

All the evidence found in the two books of Maccabees indicates that he was inspired by the noblest patriotism.

From the parallel account in II Maccabees it is clear that he did not succeed in winning a decisive victory, but a crisis in Antioch suddenly compelled Lysias to return, leaving the Jews in possession of the battle-field.

The first book of Maccabees records in detail the repeated blows that Judas struck against his heathen foes.

Describe the general character of I Maccabees.

3. II Maccabees.

The historical value of II Maccabees.

Maccabees, Johnson looks into the, ii. 189, n. 3.

The First Book of Maccabees.

The First Book of Maccabees.

Not only Homer has made use of it, but we find the Jewish Hero in the Book of Maccabees, who had fought the Battels of the chosen People with so much Glory and Success, receiving in his Dream a Sword from the Hand of the Prophet Jeremiah.

It doubtless fed the forces of that glorious revolt that shortly thereafter burst forth under the heroic Maccabees.

2 Maccabees, ii. 13.

About 600 A.D. 2 Maccabees ii.

The stirring and bloodcurdling stories in the Books of the Maccabees were his favourites.

ASMONร†`ANS, a name given to the Maccabees, from Asmon, the place of their origin.

MACCABEES, a body of Jewish patriots, followers of Judas Maccabรฆus, who in 2nd century B.C. and in the interest of the Jewish faith withstood the oppression of Syria and held their own for a goodly number of years against not only the foreign yoke that oppressed them, but against the Hellenising corruption of their faith at home.

MACCABEES, BOOKS OF, two books of the Apocrypha which give, the first, an account of the heroic struggle which the Maccabees maintained from 175 to 135 B.C. against the kings of Syria, and the second, of an intercalary period of Jewish history from 175 to 160 B.C., much of it of legendary unreliable matter; besides these two a third and a fourth of a still more apocryphal character are extant.

MACCABEES, BOOKS OF, two books of the Apocrypha which give, the first, an account of the heroic struggle which the Maccabees maintained from 175 to 135 B.C. against the kings of Syria, and the second, of an intercalary period of Jewish history from 175 to 160 B.C., much of it of legendary unreliable matter; besides these two a third and a fourth of a still more apocryphal character are extant.