Inspirassion

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91 examples of  make sense  in sentences

91 examples of make sense in sentences

'Why, I didn't make senses of my home; I just wrote down who lived here.

Of the various definitions given, you disregard all save the one which enables the word to make sense in its present context, or which fits your preconception of what the word should stand for.

Do any of the terms fail to make sense at all?

Article means is the only meaning which will make sense of either one or the other; is simply thisthat what causes a man to enjoy this life, is the same that will cause him to enjoy the life to come.

It only made sense that he would.

" "It makes sense, when you think about it," said Ozma.

"Now let anyone make sense of that!"

[Edits., know him great, which could only be made sense by supposing it to mean, knowing him rich, and not a person to be offended.

Her words did not appear to make sense.

Does it make sense?

This kind of sentence furnishes the reader with mere half-phrases, which he is then called upon to collect carefully and store up in his memory, as though they were the pieces of a torn letter, afterwards to be completed and made sense of by the other halves to which they respectively belong.

They are not encouraged, not through tax policies nor through venture capital, because they don't make sense to an industry and economy that has based its business model on the exploitation of fixed and precious resources: A closed source model.

In Stevenson's quotation, the word "all" should be inserted after the word "were" to correspond with the original text, and to make sense.

Because we had a datewere together already, reallythe universe made sense.

There were other market gurus who made sense to himJohn Train and Warren Buffett, especially.

It doesn't make sense from a financial point of view; I'll never get a teaching job.

Did developments in the story make sense in terms of earlier events?

Made sense, with a wife like that.

He looked through the manuals and tried to make sense of the system.

It did make sense; the starting point was different, that was all.

What she wants to do makes sense, but it's a lot of money.

There are more competitors for our attention than we can possibly reconcile, prioritize or make sense of.

Why not have said 'non-combatants,' which makes sense?

A soldier's job is to do what he is told whether he likes it or not, whether it is his job or not, whether it makes sense or not, whether he gets his orders from a man he looks up to and respects or whether he gets them from a low down cur that he knows perfectly well isn't fit to black his bootsnone of that makes any difference.

After each shot a man who sat with a telephone strapped about his head called out corrections of the range, in figures that were just a meaningless jumble to me, although they made sense to the men who listened and changed the pointing of the guns at each order.

Nothing that he did revealed any combination of words that made sense.

"That certainly makes sense and fits the facts, too.

To one's mind, it made sense that both 'camps' knew each other's positions on the issue.

no matter how intense?" "Makes sense, Mark.

NOTE:"A verb may generally be distinguished by its making sense with any of the personal pronouns, or the word to before it.

The phrase "by its making sense" is at least very questionable English; for "its making" supposes making to be a noun, and "making sense" supposes it to be an active participle.

The phrase "by its making sense" is at least very questionable English; for "its making" supposes making to be a noun, and "making sense" supposes it to be an active participle.

It is necessary also to observe, so far as we can, with what other words each particular one is capable of making sense.

It will make sense when inflected with the pronouns; as, I write, thou writ'st, he writes; we write, you write, they write.

They must be added to nouns or pronouns in order to make sense.

2.The noun, or substantive, is a name, which makes sense of itself.

Each of the three members is complex, because each has not only a relative clause, commencing with "who," but also an antecedent word which makes sense with "cannot look," &c.

The single particle to is quite sufficient, both to govern the infinitive, and to connect it to any antecedent term which can make sense with such an adjunct.

"] "Please insert points so as to make sense.

"A verb may generally be distinguished, by its making sense with any of the personal pronouns, or the word to before it.

"A noun may, in general, be distinguished by its taking an article before it, or by its making sense of itself.

"Merchant's Gram., p. 17; Murray's, 27; &c. "An Adjective may usually be known by its making sense with the addition of the word thing: as, a good thing; a bad thing.

To-morrow is here an adjective; and as for truly and plainly, they are not such words as can make sense with nouns.

I.When two terms connected are each to be extended and completed in sense by a third, they must both be such as will make sense with it.

But, according to Note 1st under Rule 22d, "When two terms connected are each to be extended and completed in sense by a third, they must both be such as will make sense with it."

This is what Smollett should have written, to make sense with the word "between." OBS.

"An adjective expresses the quality of the noun to which it is applied; and may generally be known by its making sense in connection with it; as, 'A good man,' 'A genteel woman.

"Any word that will make sense with to before it, is a verb.

"A word that makes sense after an article or the phrase speak of, is a noun.

"Please to insert points so as to make sense.

"Not every word that will make sense with to before it, is a verb; for to may govern nouns, pronouns, or participles.

"A word that makes sense after an article, or after the phrase speak of, is a noun.

This would at once make sense and a literal version.

Every proverb must be rendered literally, even if it doesn't make very good sense; if it doesn't make sense at all, it must be explained in a note.

Making sense.

Making sense, by Rachel Salisbury & J. Paul Leonard.

SEE WOODS, GEORGE B. Making sense.

Instructor's key for Making sense.

Instructor's key for Making sense.

SEE Ruch, G. M. Instructor's key for Making sense.

Making sense, II.

Scott, Foresman & Co. (PWH); 23Dec65; R377278. Making sense, II.

Making sense, II.

Instructor's key for Making sense III.

Scott, Foreaman & Co. (PWH); 3Jan67; R400321. Making sense III, by J. Paul Leonard & Rachel Salisbury.

Instructor's key for Making sense III.

Making sense III.

SEE Perrin, Porter G. Instructor's key for Making sense III.

Making sense III.

Rules make sense.

Making sense.

Making sense, by Rachel Salisbury & J. Paul Leonard.

SEE WOODS, GEORGE B. Making sense.

Instructor's key for Making sense.

Instructor's key for Making sense.

SEE Ruch, G. M. Instructor's key for Making sense.

Making sense, II.

Scott, Foresman & Co. (PWH); 23Dec65; R377278. Making sense, II.

Making sense, II.

Instructor's key for Making sense III.

Scott, Foreaman & Co. (PWH); 3Jan67; R400321. Making sense III, by J. Paul Leonard & Rachel Salisbury.

Instructor's key for Making sense III.

Making sense III.

SEE Perrin, Porter G. Instructor's key for Making sense III.

Making sense III.

Rules make sense.

It is certain, however, that the danger must be incurred, since nothing could make sense out of an absolutely literal interpretation.

[Footnote 214: After studying the commentators on this obscure passage, I have elected to follow the emendation of Ursinus, which, although Keil sneers at its license, has the advantage of making sense.

Every proverb must be rendered literally, even if it doesn't make very good sense: if it doesn't make sense at all, it must be explained in a note.

Despite these divisive forces, our need to function in terms of planetary oneness is so great that the term "citizens of the world" not only makes sense, but is accepted and even flaunted in the face of tough restrictions and hard nosed nationalism.

Either, however, makes sense.