Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
40 examples of  metric  in sentences

40 examples of metric in sentences

It is less frequently realized that they devoted almost as little space to discussion of metrics.

Metrics, which occupies so large a place in modern treatises on the theory of poetry, Aristotle likewise mentions several times, but does not discuss.

By far the greater part of Gascoigne's treatise is devoted to metrics and to style.

The second book, Of Proportion, 70 pages, is a treatise on metrics.

He enjoys the unenviable distinction of having no rival in ruggedness of metric movement and associated sounds.

Unit of metric system, 15.43 grains troy.

The Metric System.

[metric units of length] nanometer, nm, micron, micrometer, millimicron, millimeter, mm, centimeter, cm, meter, kilometer, km. pedometer, perambulator; scale &c (measurement) 466.

weighing, ponderation^, trutination^; weights; avoirdupois weight, troy weight, apothecaries' weight; grain, scruple, drachma^, ounce, pound, lb, arroba^, load, stone, hundredweight, cwt, ton, long ton, metric ton, quintal, carat, pennyweight, tod^. [metric weights] gram, centigram, milligram, microgram, kilogram; nanogram, picogram, femtogram, attogram.

weighing, ponderation^, trutination^; weights; avoirdupois weight, troy weight, apothecaries' weight; grain, scruple, drachma^, ounce, pound, lb, arroba^, load, stone, hundredweight, cwt, ton, long ton, metric ton, quintal, carat, pennyweight, tod^. [metric weights] gram, centigram, milligram, microgram, kilogram; nanogram, picogram, femtogram, attogram.

Adj. measuring &c v.; metric, metrical; measurable, perceptible, noticeable, detectable, appreciable, ponderable, determinable, fathomable; geodetical, topographic, topographical, cartographic, cartographical.

[Transcriber's Note: Above, the author seems to be using the European decimal point ",", in the metric measurements, and the American decimal point in the Imperial measurements, ".".]

And how much have we lost, toward a true appreciation of their dramatic art, by losing almost utterly not only the laws of their melody and harmony, but even the true metric time of their odes!music and metre, which must have surely been as noble as their poetry, their sculpture, their architecture, possessed by the same exquisite sense of form and of proportion.

Right on the threshold, then, of the great new German literature another mixture of styles sprang up, and we see, for example, Klopstock strangely transplanting his pathos into the field of theoretical researches on grammar and metrics, and Wieland not always keeping his irony aloof from the most solemn subjects.

If, therefore, the struggle with the language was fought out successfully by modern German literature only on the battleground of the lyric (and even there, as we have seen, not without exceptions), on the other hand a second conservative force was placed at the service of the literary development with more uniform success, namely Metrics.

Only one antique metre became German, in the same sense that Shakespeare had become a German poet; this was the hexameter, alone or in connection with the pentameter; for the ratio of its parts to one another, on which everything depends in higher metrics, corresponded, to some extent, to that of the German couplets.

The stock of dominating motives naturally undergoes just as many transformations as language or metrics; but, in both cases, what already exists has a determining influence on everything new, often going so far as to suppress the latter entirely.

he printand wakes, to sleep no more The world goes on, indifferent, as before; And the first notice of his metric skill Comes in the likeness ofhis printer's bill; To pen soft notes no fair enthusiast stirs, Except his laundressand who values her's?

The dog's nose is cold even when his tongue is reeking; and as he walked slowly along, his exterior showed the proper thermo-metric nonchalanceit was not the time for a pyrometric measurement within the heart.

She's rather tallnot too tall, mind youfive feet five, I'd saywhatever that is in the metric system.

The ordinary shell, charge included, weighs 1,400 pounds, and the exploding shell, under the same circumstances, 1,700 pounds, that is, more than three quarters of a metric ton.

Ten hundred and sixty-seven poundsnearly half a metric ton, more than the weight of a field piece without its carriage!

A tape measure with metric scale of measurements on one side and feet and inches on the other is most important.

SEE BLUME, L. F. BLUMENTHAL, LEONARD M. Distance geometries; a study of the development of abstract metrics.

LANE, ERNEST PRESTON. Metric differential geometry of curves and surfaces.

BUSEMANN, HERBERT. Metric methods in Finsler spaces and in the foundations of geometry.

U.S. measures and their metric equivalents.

SEE BLUME, L. F. BLUMENTHAL, LEONARD M. Distance geometries; a study of the development of abstract metrics.

LANE, ERNEST PRESTON. Metric differential geometry of curves and surfaces.

BUSEMANN, HERBERT. Metric methods in Finsler spaces and in the foundations of geometry.

U.S. measures and their metric equivalents.

The famous tale herewith briefly summarized occurs in the Mahâbhârata, the great epic or mythological cyclopaedia of India, which embraces 220,000 metric lines, and antedates in the main the Christian era.

The government motor trucks transported over it during the last fiscal year 22,390 passengers and 7696.24 metric tons of freight.

The one point which the late Chaucerians preserved of their master's metric was the five-stress character of his decasyllabic line; but in Spenser's day all memory of the syllabic e had long since vanished, and the only rhythm to be extracted from Chaucer's verse was of a four-stress type.

In the metric system, since the weight of a cubic centimetre of pure water is one gram, the density in grams per cubic centimetre has the same numerical value as the specific gravity.

He had to go to the Chansons des rues et des bois to enjoy the perfect acrobatics of his metrics.

BORDA, a French mathematician and physicist, born at Dax, in the dep. of Landes, served in both army and navy; one of those employed in measuring an arc of the meridian to establish the metric system in France (1733-1799).

DELAMBRE, JEAN JOSEPH, an eminent French astronomer, born at Amiens, a pupil of Lalande; measured with Méchain the arc of the meridian between Dunkirk and Barcelona towards the establishment of the metric system; produced numerous works of great value, among others "Theoretical and Practical Astronomy" and the "History of Astronomy" (1749-1822).

MÈTRE, the name given to the unit of length in the metric or decimal system, and equal to 39.37 English inches, the tenths, the hundreds, and the thousands of which are called from the Latin respectively decimetres, centimetres, and millimetres, and ten times, a hundred times, and a thousand times, which are called from the Greek respectively decamètres, hectomètres, and kilomètres.

The light to be measured is caused to shine upon a photo-electric current-generating cell, and the current thus produced flows through a galvano-metric coil in circuit, whose index indicates upon its scale the intensity of the light.