Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
Do we say   moon   or  sun

Do we say moon or sun

moon 8232 occurrences

I guess TOM won't say much more about staring at the moon.

It really seems as though Earth would answer for a Moon, by and by, at this rate!

It's only waiting for a change of moon.

The new moon hung athwart the western sky, and a few fleecy clouds were chasing each other like snow-drifts across the blue vault of the night.

He had no more idea of meeting me at that moment than of meeting the man in the moon, and yet, no sooner had he seen my facewhich he had not looked upon for eight yearsthan the whole 'case' flashed upon him.

Then PHYSKE did bring unto himself other boats and other roads, and waxed powerful, and became great in the land, and he was much interviewed by the scribes of a certain paper, "It shines for all," which, being interpreted, is the Moon, and his sayingscan they not be found in the pages of "It shines for all," which, being interpreted, is the Moon, and are they not preserved there for two centuries?

Then PHYSKE did bring unto himself other boats and other roads, and waxed powerful, and became great in the land, and he was much interviewed by the scribes of a certain paper, "It shines for all," which, being interpreted, is the Moon, and his sayingscan they not be found in the pages of "It shines for all," which, being interpreted, is the Moon, and are they not preserved there for two centuries?

And it came to pass that he and the centurion, which is Brainsfor should not body and brains work together?did march the soldiers down the street which is called Broadway, and did take them to the Branch which is called Long, and there did divers curious things, all which are they not found in the paper, "It shines for all," which, being interpreted, is the Moon?

And PHYSKE did divers other strange and curious things, but are they not written down daily by the scribes of the paper, "It shines for all," which, being interpreted, is the Moon, and cannot he who runs, read them there? LOT.

I laid me down behind a Thicket near, Where undiscover'd I could see and hear; The Moon the Day supply'd, and all below Instructed, even as much as Day could do.

The night was mild, and the yellow radiance of the moon seemed almost warmth-giving.

But one black night, in the Moon of Wildfowl, the raiders descended in a torrent and took us unprepared.

To-night the moon is full, and the prophet makes intercession with his God.

The fires died down, the smoke thinned, and the full moon rising over the crest of the hills poured her light on us.

The world was very still, and the moon set, and the only light was the flickering lamp.

He again fixed it to the day arranged by the Council, the 14th of the Paschal moon.

At the end of the second year the new moon falls 22 days sooner than in the first year.

Again, in 1911 the epact is not marked by a number, but by an asterisk (see Table in Breviary) which is placed under the golden number 12, and in the calendar for the whole year will indicate the new moon on January 1st, January 31st (for in February there is no new moon indicated in the Table; the sign [*] is not found), on March 1st, March 31st, and on April 29th.

Again, in 1911 the epact is not marked by a number, but by an asterisk (see Table in Breviary) which is placed under the golden number 12, and in the calendar for the whole year will indicate the new moon on January 1st, January 31st (for in February there is no new moon indicated in the Table; the sign [*] is not found), on March 1st, March 31st, and on April 29th.

In virtue of the decree of the Council of Nice, in 325, Easter, on which all other movable feasts depend, must be celebrated on the Sunday which follows immediately the fourteenth day of the moon of the first month (in the Hebrew year), our March.

Easter, then, is the first Sunday after the Paschal full moon (i.e., the full moon which happens upon or next after March 21st).

Easter, then, is the first Sunday after the Paschal full moon (i.e., the full moon which happens upon or next after March 21st).

If full moon happens on a Sunday, Easter Sunday is the Sunday after the full moon.

If full moon happens on a Sunday, Easter Sunday is the Sunday after the full moon.

A full moon hung over the deserted streets of the sleeping city.

There was a skiff alongside, and in it Copley Banks and the dumb steward made their way to the beach, and looked back upon the brig riding in the moon-light just outside the shadow of the palm trees.

The moon had shone out between two rain-clouds, and threw the old house into silver and shadow.

The moon had gone in again, and it was raining heavily.

The Countess Jutta passed over the Rhine In a light canoe by the moon's pale shine.

the many Moon-light Nights that I have walked by my self, and thought on the Widow by the Musek of the Nightingales!

9. 'The cold grows soft with western gales, The summer over spring prevails, But yields to autumn's fruitful rain, As this to winter storms and hails; Each loss the hasting moon repairs again.' (Sir W. Temple).

vi. 270. 'Thus wander travellers in woods by night, By the moon's doubtful and malignant light.

THE REMONSTRANCE NOCTURNE THE EXILE THE UNCHANGING INVOCATION EYES LIFE THE DISGUISE VAIN QUESTIONING VIGIL THE OLD MEN THE DREAMER MOTLEY THE MARIONETTES TO E.T.: 1917 APRIL MOON THE FOOL'S SONG CLEAR EYES DUST TO DUST THE THREE STRANGERS ALEXANDER THE REAWAKENING THE VACANT DAY THE FLIGHT FOR ALL THE GRIEF THE SCRIBE FARE

Above them silence lours, Still as an arctic sea; Light fails; night falls; the wintry moon Glitters; the crocus soon Will ope grey and distracted On earth's austerity: Thick mystery, wild peril, Law like an iron rod: Yet sport they on in Spring's attire, Each with his tiny fire Blown to a core of ardour By the awful breath of God.

NIGHT All from the light of the sweet moon Tired men lie now abed; Actionless, full of visions, soon Vanishing, soon sped.

In London, about the period of the ninth moon, The inhabitants delight in travelling to a distance; They change their abodes and betake themselves to the country, Visiting their friends in their rural retreats.

There was no moon, but the stars gave sufficient light to render the scene distinctly visible.

My Lord Denbigh is going to marry a fortune, I forget her name; my Lord Gower asked him how long the honey-moon would last?

He replied, "Don't tell me of the honey-moon; it is harvest moon with me."

He replied, "Don't tell me of the honey-moon; it is harvest moon with me."

Following the old man's suggestion, the young man has rounded out the honeymoon into a harvest moon, and is sending in some very satisfactory orders to the house.

" No doubt, when the princesses spoke of the gods of the earth, reference was made to such pagan deities as Beal; Dagda the great or the good god; Aine, the Moon, goddess of the water and of wisdom; Manannan macLir, the Irish Neptune; Crom, the Irish Ceres; and Iphinn, the benevolent, whose relations to the Irish Oirfidh resembled those of Apollo towards Orpheus; and to the allegiance they owed to the Elements, the Wind, and the Stars.

Some of Lady Gregory's earlier one-act farces, such as The Workhouse-Ward, are very amusing; The Rising of the Moon is a little dramatic gem, and The Gaol Gate is touched with genuine tragedy.

A difference was also noticed between the day and night tides at Rat Island, where the time of high-water at the full and change of the moon was ten o'clock, and the rise varied from 8 to 32 inches, from the result of twenty-five observations; by which I found, moreover, that the tides ebbed five hours and a half in the night, and six hours and a half during the day, and the water fell 9 inches with the night, and 18 with the day ebb.

As we drew near our progress was impeded by a fierce south-east breeze during the forenoons, which we found to prevail during our stay, being stronger at the full and change of the moon.

The tide rose here 15 feet near full moon.

In connection with our former remarks on striking vicissitudes in the weather occurring near the change of the moon, we should mention that it was new moon the day following.

In connection with our former remarks on striking vicissitudes in the weather occurring near the change of the moon, we should mention that it was new moon the day following.

Moon : Allee : Magee.

At the entrance of Van Diemen's Inlet it is high-water on the full and change of the moon at a quarter to seven; but in the upper part the tides are three hours and a quarter later.

Her bosom seemed to lift as the tide lifts to the moon.

She had large feet, large hips, a large waist, and large lungs; but as she took our hands in the friendliest of greetings, and beamed on us from her full-moon face, we felt how delightful it was to get home once more.

On the other hand, the full moon was rising above the eastern hills in a haze of silver, but with a calmness and serene majesty which formed a direct antithesis to the sinking sun she faced.

The moon was broad, like one of the shields in the great hall, whither I went often when the great Duke was not at home, and when old Hanne would be busy cleaning the pavement and scrubbing viciously at the armor of the iron knights who stood on pedestals round about.

The great court-yard, roofed with the vault of stars and lit by the moon, was to see all done that remained to be done.

Because have I seen it at six o'clock of a Thursday in the time of full moon.

But the little Helene swept majestically off, muttering to herself, but so that I could hear her: "'O wondrous, most wondrous,' quoth our cat Mall, when she saw her Tom betwixt her and the moon.

The moon just stuck one eye over the edge of the prairie, and the rest of the sky was covered with cloud.

I slacked up, patting myself on the back; and, as the trouble seemed all over, I was just about to turn for the ranch, when I heard horses galloping, and as the moon came out a little I saw a whole raft of redskins a-boiling up a draw not half a mile away.

Then thy destiny shall snatch the sceptre from thy hand, thy moon shall wane, no longer wilt thou be strong and proud, then thy servants shall be destitute of all things.

The celebration of a midsummer festival by Mohammedan peoples is particularly remarkable, because the Mohammedan calendar, being purely lunar and uncorrected by intercalation, necessarily takes no note of festivals which occupy fixed points in the solar year; all strictly Mohammedan feasts, being pinned to the moon, slide gradually with that luminary through the whole period of the earth's revolution about the sun.

Thus the rites of fire and water which are observed in Morocco at Midsummer and New Year appear to be identical in character and intention, and it seems certain that the duplication of the rites is due to a conflict between two calendars, namely the old Julian calendar of the Romans, which was based on the sun, and the newer Mohammedan calendar of the Arabs, which is based on the moon.

Above the white fog the moon rose like a knob of fire in the east, and a thousand thousand stars were twinkling in the sky.

The sea below gleams wavingly, like steel damasked with gold on an escutcheonthat above swells like a silver surge lighted by the full moon, which rolls along the sky like a cup of gold, while the stars glitter around like scattered drops.

The moon had paled to a ghostly circle.

And again that hatred seized me for all this pale Northern world, where the very birds gyrated like moon-smitten sprites, and the white spectre of virtue sat amid orgies where bloodless fools caroused.

Follow the Brandt-Meester if Dorothy slips you, and tell her I'll birch her, big as she is, if she's not home by the new moon rise.

"An' ye'll bear me out," he shouted, "that there's them wha' hear these words now shall meet their weirds ere a hunter's moon is wasted!" He laughed his insane laugh and, throwing his rifle over his shoulder, halted, facing us.

There is company at the housesome of Colonel Gansevoort's officers, Third Regiment of the New York line, if you please, and two impudent young ensigns of the Half-moon Regiment, all on their way to Stanwix fort.

" "Paltz Clavarack, of the Half-moon Regiment, asked me to walk a minuet," observed Cecile, tossing her head.

As for the men, there was young Paltz Clavarack, ensign in the Half-moon Regiment, very fine in his orange-faced uniform; and there was Major Harrow, of the New York line; and a jolly, handsome dare-devil, Captain Tully O'Neil, of the escort of horse, who hung to Dorothy's skirts and whispered things that made her laugh.

Directly ahead a ravine, shaped like a half-moon, cut the road, and the noisy Canajoharie regiment was marching into it.

The sun sank behind the forest, turning the river to a bloody red; a fox yapped and yapped from a dark hill-side; the moon's yellow light flashed out through the trees; and, with the coming of the moon, far in the wilderness the owls began and the cries of the night-hawks died away in the sky.

The sun sank behind the forest, turning the river to a bloody red; a fox yapped and yapped from a dark hill-side; the moon's yellow light flashed out through the trees; and, with the coming of the moon, far in the wilderness the owls began and the cries of the night-hawks died away in the sky.

I'm half dead, thank youand my shins!you should see where that razor-boned nag of mine shaved bark enough off the trees with me to start every tannery between the Fish-House and Half-moon!"

The Moon thought she knew her own orbit well enough; but when she saw the curve on Zuleika's cheek, she was at a loss: "And since round lines are drawn My darling's lips about, The very Moon looks puzzled on, And hesitates in doubt If the sweet curve that rounds thy mouth Be not her true way to the South.

The Moon thought she knew her own orbit well enough; but when she saw the curve on Zuleika's cheek, she was at a loss: "And since round lines are drawn My darling's lips about, The very Moon looks puzzled on, And hesitates in doubt If the sweet curve that rounds thy mouth Be not her true way to the South.

In less than a quarter by the moon, the coffers of the government were empty,the very clerks in its employ went about the streets borrowing money to pay their board-bills,and the grand-master of the vaults, Mr. Cobb, counting his fingers in despair over the vacant prospect, was compelled, in the extremity of his distress, to fill his limp sacks with paper.

To-night I pace this pallid floor, The sparkling waves curl up the shore, The August moon is flushed and full; The soft, low winds, the liquid lull, The whited, silent, misty realm, The wan-blue heaven, each ghostly elm, All these, her ministers, conspire To fill my bosom with the fire And sweet delirium of desire.

The moon had set behind the cleft summits of La Pagna.

Their personal inconveniences were like the shilling that hides the moon, and, in the resentment they occasioned, blinded their hearts to the seriousness of the evils from which their merely temporary annoyance was the deliverance of their neighbors.

It was a lovely moon-lighted midnight when they set out, the four of them, to walk from the gate across the park to the Old House.

The moon, having labored through a heap of cloud into a lake of blue, seemed to watch her with curious interest as she toiled over the level sward.

andlike a marvel in a fairy-talethe great round moon was shining gloriously, first through the upper branches of a large yew, and then through an oriel window, filled with lozenges of soft greenish glass, through which fell a lovely picture on the floor in light and shadow and something that was neither or both.

Let the moon with her soft and silent light watch over me; let dawn spread its fulgent splendor; let the wind moan with solemn murmur.

Hudson's Voyage, 1609.He set forth in 1609 in the Half-Moon, a stanch little ship.

Soon the Half-Moon entered the mouth of the river that still bears her captain's name.

It is claimed that there are really two Niles, which take their rise either in the Mountains of the Sun or of the Moon, or in the rugged Sierras of Ethiopia.

They affirm that it rises in the Mountains of the Moon, and that it is another Nile, since crocodiles are seen there, and crocodiles only live in streams belonging to the basin of the Nile.

Shall we declare that these Niles rise in the Mountains of the Moon?

Other waters than those of the Nile may produce crocodiles, and our recent explorers have supplied proof of this fact, for the rivers do not flow from the Mountains of the Moon, nor can they have the same source as the Egyptian Nile, or the Nile of Negricia or of Melinde; for they flow down from the mountains we have mentioned, rising between the north and south sea, and which separate the two oceans by a very small distance.

"It was eveningafter supper, you seeand the light of the moon was already brighter than the sunlight.

If you are one of those captious people who must verify by the calendar every new moon you read of in a book, and if you are pained to discover the historian lifting anchor and spreading sail contrary to the reckonings of the nautical almanac, I beg to call your attention to these items from the time-table of the Mid-Western and Southern Railway for December, 1901.

So it was with me that evening when I went forth into the quiet fields where the summer moon was shining, and knew that Hortense was mine at lastmine now and for ever.

Then, when the moon rises, we shall sail out upon the bay in our own tiny felucca; or perhaps go down through the town to that white villa gleaming out above the dark tops of yonder cypresses, and spend some pleasant hours with Dalrymple and his wife.

They condensed a honey-moon into these four days, and came home compensated for their patience, and more devoted than ever.

Only thinkmeMary Bartleya clandestine marriage, and then our going to the lakes again, and spending our honey-moon together just like other couplesthe recklessnessthe audacity!

Handsome couple they were, sir, and spending their honey-moon.

"Nay," said he, shaking his head knowingly, "you are not the gentleman that spent the honey-moon with the lady as owns it.

"Then how comes it that your niece therewhose name is Miss Clifford, I believespent what this good man calls a honey-moon, with a young gentleman, at this good man's inn?" Here the good man in question made a faint endeavor to interpose, but the gentlefolks by their impetuosity completely suppressed him.

sun 22272 occurrences

[reads.] Expect to morrow night to hear I'm dead, since the next Sun will guide me to a fatal Marriage with old Francisco.

This was extremely laborious work, and the men were so used up working in the scorching sun that they were compelled to work at nights and sleep during the day.

On the south side the valley is narrow and deep, and the sun cannot produce its full effect.

On the north side the surface is sloping, and more exposed to the sun's rays.

The first time the party crossed, the sun was shining brightly, and this brought on snow blindness, the pain of which only those who have suffered from this complaint can realize.

"It's certainly not the James, for the sun is setting at our back!"

If you would realize the wondrous necromancy of the sun, pass a night in some primeval forest, untouched by the hand of man.

He had passed all his life in the vicinity, and with the first beams of the sun he pointed to a narrow wooden bridge.

Moreover I have learned that behind the blackest cloud is a glory of sun, and beyond sorrow, joy.

A glory of sun dappled their way with dancing shadows, flowers were a-bloom in bank and hedgerow, and birds carolled blithe in the fragrant air, what time Sir Benedict rode beside Beltane, his ponderous casque a-swing at saddle-bow; and oft he turned his grizzled head to view my thoughtful Beltane as one might look upon a son, new-found.

And now as they went, came they on many and divers signs of the Red Pertolepe's passing; here a smouldering heap of ruin whereby lay pale, stiff shapes half hidden in the grassyonder a little child outstretched as though asleep, save for wide eyes that looked so blindly on the sun: and there, beyond, upon the white dust of the road, great gouts and pools that had trickled from something sprawled among the underbrush.

Thus marched they, through heat and dust, through cool, green shadow, splashing through noisy brook and shallow ford, until, as the sun reached the zenith, they came to the brow of a hill and saw afar the walls and roofs of the prosperous town of Winisfarne.

And presently he rose and lifted his hand, whereat the trumpets blared and, thereafter, with ring of hoof and tramp of foot, marched they forth of Winisfarne, the sun bright on helm and shield, a right gallant array.

mine eyes are dazzled with the sun.

But with no friendly voice, and add thy name O Sun, to tell thee how I hate thy beams.' Milton's Paradise Lost, iv. 35.

With his short legs wide apart, his hands behind him, and his rosy face as round and radiant as a rising sun, Toady stood before the fire surveying the scene with the air of a man who has successfully carried through a difficult and dangerous undertaking, and wasn't proud.

" The studio was deserted all that afternoon, for Psyche sat in the orchard drawing squirrels on the wall, pert robins hopping by, buttercups and mosses, elves and angels; while May lay contentedly enjoying sun and air, sisterly care, and the "pretty things" she loved so well.

We lay for some time basking in the sun, talking of books and people, and of many subjects of common interest.

When all the straggling baidarkas had caught up and taken their places in the line, the chief gave the word Kedar ("Come on"), and we all paddled forward, and just as the sun was rising above the hills we reached our journey's end.

Great banks of snow lay in many of the highest passes, and over all the landscape the sun shone faintly through leaden and sombre storm clouds.

We were just about to return to camp when Hunter saw glistening in the sun among the thick alders, just above the timber line, the massive antlers of a moose.

The sun had not yet risen, but a tinge of pink flushed up as far as the cloudless zenith, and the long strip of sea lay like a rosy ribbon across the horizon.

[1023] In like manner Wesley said of Rousseau:'Sure a more consummate coxcomb never saw the sun....

The first day he was away was dreadful sultry; the sun went down away over the woods in a kind of a red-hot fog, and it seemed as though the stars were dull and coppery at night; even the whip-poor-wills was too hot to sing; nothin' but a doleful screech-owl quavered away, a half a mile off, a good hour, steady.

He heeded neither the broiling sun, the rain nor the storm; he drank spring water and ate wild berries, and when he was tired, he lay down under a tree; and he would come home at night covered with earth and blood, with thistles in his hair and smelling of wild beasts.

He travelled through regions so torrid that the heat of the sun would set fire to the hair on one's head; he journeyed through countries so glacial that one's arms would fall from the body; and he passed through places where the fogs were so dense that it seemed like being surrounded by phantoms.

The scarlet reflection of the stained window, which just then was struck by the sun, lighted up the bloody spots and appeared to scatter them around the whole room.

The sea glittered brightly in the sun and was as smooth as a mirror, and so calm that they could scarcely distinguish its murmur; sparrows chirped joyfully and the immense canopy of heaven spread over it all.

Sometimes the sun, shining through the clouds, made her blink her lids, when she gazed at the sails in the distance, and let her eyes roam over the horizon from the chateau of Tancarville to the lighthouses of Havre.

The sun fell on the piteous things, disclosing their spots and the creases formed by the motions of the body.

When the cancer broke, she dressed it every day; sometimes she brought him some cake and placed him in the sun on a bundle of hay; and the poor old creature, trembling and drooling, would thank her in his broken voice, and put out his hands whenever she left him.

There is always sun; there are always blue and scarlet and yellow and purple.

The centuries fight such,now with a Titian, a Michel Angelo; now with a great philanthropist, who is also peaceable and easy to be entreated; now with a Florence Nightingale, knowing no sect; now with a little child by a roadside, holding up a marigold in the sun; now with a sweet-faced old woman, dying gracefully in some almshouse.

When I go out to my breakfast the sun is streaming in on the flowers and Anton's face.

and "Behold these trees and this water; and how the sun glowed on the day when I walked there!" and all the while the cherub is like a paper doll, and the trees and the water never had any likeness to any thing that is in this beautiful earth.

The White men are ten millions, The thriftiest under the sun; The Reds are fifty thousand, And warriors every one.

Amid tears and sobs and stifled groans he discoursed calmly on his approaching departure, gave his affectionate benedictions, and commended them and his cause to Christ; lingering longer than was expected, but dying in the highest triumphs of Christian faith, May 27, 1564, in the arms of his faithful and admiring Beza, as the rays of the setting-sun gilded with their glory his humble chamber of toil and spiritual exaltation.

For an instant it gave me the illusion of a hill on fire: for the late sun shone full on the thick ripe stalks of the buckwheat, giving forth an abundant red glory that blessed the eye.

And thus the sun went down and the purple mists crept silently along the distant low spots, and all the great, great mysteries came and stood before me beckoning and questioning.

Even the air, which was perfectly still, seemed full of frost crystals, so that when the sun came up one seemed to walk in a magic world.

ROBIN AND RICHARD Robin and Richard were two pretty men, They lay in bed till the clock struck ten; Then up starts Robin and looks at the sky, "Oh, brother Richard, the sun's very high!

They bask in the sun, and hunt for food, raising themselves on their fleshy fins....

I have attached greater importance than I did formerly to the elevation of the Sun....

The computations for the observations have been exceptionally heavy, from the circumstance that the Sun was very low (86ยฐ 14' Z.D. at the last observation) and that it has therefore been necessary to compute the refraction with great accuracy, involving the calculation of the zenith distance for every observation.

Amongst other interesting spectroscopic observations of the Sun, a remarkable spectrum of a sun-spot shewing 17 strong black lines or bands, each as broad as b1, in the solar spectrum, was observed on 1880, Nov. 27 and 29.

Amongst other interesting spectroscopic observations of the Sun, a remarkable spectrum of a sun-spot shewing 17 strong black lines or bands, each as broad as b1, in the solar spectrum, was observed on 1880, Nov. 27 and 29.

Tropical Sun-sets, by Dr. Philip, is just to our mind and measure: A setting sun between the tropics is certainly one of the finest objects in nature.

Tropical Sun-sets, by Dr. Philip, is just to our mind and measure: A setting sun between the tropics is certainly one of the finest objects in nature.

The splendour of the scene generally commenced about twenty minutes before sun-set, when the feathery, fantastic, and regularly crystallized clouds in the higher regions of the atmosphere, became fully illumined by the sun's rays; and the fine mackerel-shaped clouds, common in these regions, were seen hanging in the concave of heaven like fleeces of burnished gold.

The splendour of the scene generally commenced about twenty minutes before sun-set, when the feathery, fantastic, and regularly crystallized clouds in the higher regions of the atmosphere, became fully illumined by the sun's rays; and the fine mackerel-shaped clouds, common in these regions, were seen hanging in the concave of heaven like fleeces of burnished gold.

Were I to attempt to account for the exquisite enjoyment on beholding the setting sun between the tropics, I should perhaps say, that it arose from the warmth, the repose, the richness, the novelty, the glory of the whole, filling the mind with the most exalted, tranquillizing, and beautiful images.

Powerful as may be the aid which the editor has received from the contributors to the "Friendship's Offering," we are bound to distinguish one of his own piecesGlen-Lynden, a Tale of Teviot-dale, as the sun of the volume.

At sunrise to-morrow, the 7th instant, a Federal salute will be fired from the military stations in the vicinity of Washington, minute guns between the hours of 12 and 3, and a national salute at the setting of the sun.

Wil-lie whistl-ed, and cut a-way, not-with-stand-ing the burn-ing heat of the sun: his sic-kle glis-ten-ed, and the corn fell in such long sweeps that I do be-lieve it was as ma-gi-cal as the hands them-selves.

To mar-ket, per-haps: ask the youth who is trudg-ing by its side, with a smil-ing, hap-py face, rud-dy with health and the warm tinge of the sun.

Jerrold's mother lay out there on a pile of cushions, in the sun.

Impulse moved her, one moment, to seize on the faithful, defiant little heart of Anne, the next, to get up out of the sun.

The birds are calling, the church bell rings; The sun is shining, and I am here, Waitingand waitingfor you, my dear.

We rarely get a glimpse of their poetry, for the very reason that we ourselves are factors in it, and are, therefore, too apt to dwell on the less happy details of the domestic life, details which one ray of their poetry would transfigure as the sun transfigures the motes in his beam.

The sun is weary, for he ran So far and fast to-day; The birds are weary, for who sang So many songs as they?

The sun has shut his golden eye, And gone to sleep beneath the sky; The birds, and butterflies, and bees Have all crept into flowers and trees, And all lie quiet, still as mice, Till morning comes, like father's voice.

When the Sun and the Golden Day Hand in hand are gone away, At your door shall Sleep and Night Come and knock in the fair twilight; Let them in, twin travellers blest; Each shall be an honoured guest, And give you rest.

Night and Sleep, that goodly twain, Tho' they go, shall come again; When your work and play are done, And the Sun and Day are gone Hand in hand thro' the scarlet West, Each shall come, an honoured guest, And bring you rest.

Watching at your window-sill, If upon the Eastern hill Sun and Day come back no more, They shall lead you from the door To their kingdom calm and blest, Farther off than East or West, And give you rest.

Then, in one corner of the board, a sun was rising with a merry face and flaming locks, and beneath him was written, 'Phoebus-Apollo'; while in the other corner was a setting moon, 'Lady Cynthia.

The days of the week should mean for them what they did mean, should come with a veritable personality, such as the sun and the moon gained for them by thus having actual names, like friends and playfellows.

The hour was full of magic, for though the sun had set, the smile of her day's joy with him had not yet faded from the face of earth.

Although she exhibits the diamond tassels sparkling in St. James's sun or the musk and amber that perfume the Mall, she never penetrates beyond externalities.

The curtains stretched across the sky-opening to keep off the sun were of purple and in the centre of them was an embroidered figure of Nero driving a chariot, with golden stars gleaming all about him.

When the permeating softness suddenly yielded to full transparency, spreading from the fanfare of the rising sun come bolt above the range, and the mist rose, she left the road at sight of two ponies and a burro in a group, their heads together in drooping fellowship.

When he rises from his bed he may be himself or he may ride away madly into the face of the sun.

She wished every bullet that you fired luckluck for your sake, to speed it straight to the mark!" He seemed to understand what she was saying, as one understands that shade is cool after the broiling torment of the sun.

Come here, so that I can feel of you and make sure, you son of the sun!"

And after the hardest climb of all, here he is very near the top again, and" "Andand" "I'll have to finish this story later," said Jack, sending the youngsters on their way, while he went his own to call to Firio, as he entered the yard: "Son of the sun, I feel so strong that I am going for a ride!"

With the town behind him and the sinking sun over his shoulder, the battered knight rode toward the foothills and on up the winding path, oblivious of the Eternal Painter's magic and conscious only that every step brought him nearer his Heart's Desire.

Thus they watched the sun go down, gilding the foliage of their Little Rivers, seeing their future in the fulness and richness of the life of their choice, which should spread the oasis the length of that valley, and knowing that any excursions to the world over the pass would only sink their roots deeper in the soil of the valley that had given them life.

Think, too, of the extent to which you would be interviewed by the reporters of the Sun, and the atrocious libels concerning yourselves and your families which that unclean sheet would publish.

XI The July sun enclosed in a ring of fire the ilex grove of a villa in the hills near Siena.

The sun, treading the earth like a vintager, drew from it heady fragrances, crushed out of it new colours.

Ralph said to himself that no one who had not seen Italy thus prostrate beneath the sun knew what secret treasures she could yield.

Some of those whom Washington Square left unvisited were the centre of social systems far outside its ken, and as indifferent to its opinions as the constellations to the reckonings of the astronomers; and all these systems joyously revolved about their central sun of gold.

" An', sir, with that he thess turns round, an' he says, says he, "Sonny Jones," says he, addressin' hisself, "what's the cause of total eclipses of the sun?"

apple is the sun."

[Illustration: "'This orange is the earth, an' this here apple is the sun.'

The bard was much interested in the glowing eastern sky, and as the sun began to appear he turned to William Peregrine and enthusiastically exclaimed: "'.... what envious streaks Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east: Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.'"

v.] "To be sure, to be sure, it do look a bit comical, don't it?" answered the yeoman, with a cackle; and then, turning to his brother, he said, "Ain't 'e ever seen the sun rise before?

Get the hawks, Bill; the sun be up.

When Charles II. escaped from Worcester he put up at an old hostelry in Cirencester called the Sun.

" Pay the piper, and the sport you love so well will flourish yet, Flourish in the dim hereafter; and its sun will never set.

" Thus wrote Shakespeare of bold chanticleer; and perhaps the rooks when they are grieving for their lost ones, hold solemn requiem until the morning light and the cheering rays of the sun make them forget their woes.

But how few of mankind are ever willing to own themselves mistaken about any subject under the sun, unless it be bimetallism or some equally unfashionable and abstruse (though not unimportant) problem of the day!

But last night there came a change: the sun went down beyond the purple hills like a ball of fire; eastwards the woods were painted with a reddish glow, and life and colour returned to everything that grows on the face of this beautiful earth.

So it is pleasant to-day to wander over the fields; across the crisp stubbles, where the thistledown is crowding in the "stooks" of black oats; past stretches of uncut corn looking red and ripe under a burning sun.

But when the sun gets low, and the great brown moths come out and flutter over the water, the red palmer will catch a dish of fish.

Standing on the bridge by the ancient spiked gate bristling with sharp barbs of iron, like rusty spear and arrow-heads (our ancestors loved to protect their privacy with these terrible barriers), I listened to the waterfall three hundred yards higher up, with its ceaseless music; the afternoon sun was sparkling on the dimpling water, which runs swiftly here over a shallow reach of gravelthe favourite spawning-ground of the trout.

But when the afternoon sun shines upon it, it becomes a stream of diamonds set in banks of emeralds, with an arched and groined roof of jasper, carved with foliations of graceful ash and willow, and over all a sky of sapphire sprinkled with clouds of pearl and opal.

And as the day declines the last beams of the setting sun will find their way through the tracery of foliage that overhangs the brook, and the waters will be tinged with a rosy glow, even as in some ancestral hall or Gothic cathedral the sun at eventide pours through the blazoned windows and floods the interior with rays of soft, mysterious, coloured light.

And as the day declines the last beams of the setting sun will find their way through the tracery of foliage that overhangs the brook, and the waters will be tinged with a rosy glow, even as in some ancestral hall or Gothic cathedral the sun at eventide pours through the blazoned windows and floods the interior with rays of soft, mysterious, coloured light.

Harold tossed my sun-bonnet on the ground, and said shortly, "Come on, Goodchum, we must be going.

Shadows under the midnight sun.