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57 examples of  nash's  in sentences

57 examples of nash's in sentences

See Nash's Magazine for October, 1914, article by "Diplomatist.

It was her father, however, who took the front seat, and behind Nash's back he had slyly winked at Lenore, as if to compliment her on the evident success of their deep plot.

He had seen that action of Nash's.

But Nash's thought seemed turned mostly inward.

Anderson's big hand shot out to clutch Nash, holding him powerless, and with the other hand he searched Nash's inside coat pockets, to tear forth a packet of letters.

Kurt stepped aside and took a quick shot at the tire of Nash's left hind wheel.

Nash's car lurched, skidded into the bank

Hardly aware of Nash's blows, Kurt tore at him, swung and choked him, bore him down on the bank, and there beat him into a sodden, bloody-faced heap.

So in Nash's "Lenten Stuff," 1599: "Nay, I will lay no wagers, for, now I perponder more sadly upon it, I think I am out indeed.

" Many of Nash's works furnish evidence that he was well acquainted with Italian poets and writers.

" Nash's "Isle of Dogs" was doubtless a satire upon the age, which "touched too near" some persons in authority.

[As to Nash's withdrawal of his apology, see Hazlitt in v.]

There is a very apposite passage in Nash's "Christ's Tears over Jerusalem," 1593, where he is referring to the resort of spendthrifts and prodigals to usurers for supplies:

A passage quoted in Note 6 to "Gammer Gurton's Needle," from Nash's "Pierce Penniless," is precisely in point, both in explaining the word, and knocking the cup, can, or jack on the thumb-nail, previously performed by Bacchus.

" In the quarto copy of Nash's play the word swains is misprinted for swans.

From the passage in Nash's play, it seems that Irish and Danish witches could sell winds: Macbeth's witches were Scotish.

Nash's "Lenten Stuff," affords evidence that "the witty play of 'The Case is Altered'" was popular in 1599.

As in Nash's "Pierce Penilesse, his Supplication to the Divell," 1592, p. 15: "But whist, these are the workes of darknesse, and may not be talkt of in the daytime."

In an old poem called the return to Parnassus; or a scourge for Simony, Nash's character is summed up in four lines, which Mrs. Cooper thinks is impartially done. Let all his faults sleep in his mournful chest, And there for ever with his ashes rest!

One of the earliest types of this picaresque novel in English is Nash's The Unfortunate Traveller, or the Life of Jack Wilton (1594), which is also a forerunner of the historical novel, since its action takes place during that gorgeous interview between Henry VIII and the king of France on the Field of the Cloth of Gold.

Nares quotes from Nash's "Pierce Pennilesse":"A knight of the post, quoth he, for so I am tearmed: a fellow that will swear any thing for twelve pence.

He was yawning as he restored the gun beneath the blanket, but from the corner of his eye he saw the hardening of Nash's face, a brief change which came and went like the passing of a shadow.

And Nash's testimony accords with what we know of the social and literary history of the age.

[Footnote E: It seems clear, on the contrary, that Nash's object was to sneer at Jasper Heywood, Alexander Nevil, John Studley, Thomas Nuce, and Thomas Newton,one or more of them,whose Seneca, his Tenne Tragedies translated into Englysh, was published in 1581.

One reason for the regarding of Nash's sneer as especially directed against Shakespeare is the occurrence in it of the phrase, "whole Hamlets,I should say, handfuls of tragical speeches," which has been looked upon as an allusion to Shakespeare's great tragedy.

That Shakespeare had written this tragedy in 1586, when he was but twenty-two years old, is improbable to the verge of impossibility; and Nash's allusion, if, indeed, he meant a punning sneer at a play, (which is not certain.) was, doubtless, to an old lost version of the Danish tragedy upon which Shakespeare built his "Hamlet.

From printed calico to printed books, from Kean's acting to Nash's architecture, all is made to catch the eye, to gratify the appetite for novelty, without regard to real and substantial excellence.

The most noteworthy of them were Nash's Piers Penniless's Supplication to the Devil, Lyly's Pap with a Hatchet, and Greene's Groat's Worth of Wit.

At least Mr. Scott gave him access to Nash's papers, and with these he seems to have betaken himself back to London.

This seems to have gone to the conscience of Hogs-Norton at last; but what really gave the death-blow to top-boots, as a part of evening dress, was the incident of Nash's going up to a gentleman, who had made his appearance in the ball-room in this unpardonable costume, and remarking, "bowing in an arch manner," that he appeared to have "forgotten his horse.

In all the repertory of Nash's extravagances there is not one story of this kind, not one that reveals a wicked force.

and years aftuh dat de Nash's bought hit fum de Tatums.

abroad in Nash's and Pall Mall magazine, Mar.-Apr., July-Aug. 1926, illustrated by Norah Schlegel)

(Pub. abroad in 6 installments in Nash's Pall mall, Feb.-July 1930)

(Pub. abroad in Nash's Pall mall magazine, Mar. 1935) (In Hearst's international-cosmopolitan, Mar. 1935)

(Pub. abroad as Butterflies in Nash's Pall-mall magazine, Apr. 1935)

(In Hearst's international-cosmopolitan, Apr. 1936) (Pub. abroad in Nash's Pall Mall magazine, Oct. 1935) ยฉ 18Sep35, AI-20763; 10Mar36, B293542.

(Pub. abroad in Nash's pall mall magazine, Dec. 1935-May 1936.

(Pub. abroad as Further experiences of George Sherston in Nash's Pall Mall magazine, June-Aug. 1936)

(In Nash's Pall Mall magazine, June 1937) ยฉ 26May37, AI-22942; 31Aug37, A109282.

(In Nash's Pall Mall magazine, July 1937. Illustrated by W. Smithson Broadhead) ยฉ 25Jun37, AI-22972; 31Aug37; A109282.

Ogden Nash's Musical zoo for voice and piano.

Ogden Nash's Musical zoo for voice and piano.

abroad in Nash's and Pall Mall magazine, Mar.-Apr., July-Aug. 1926, illustrated by Norah Schlegel)

(Pub. abroad in 6 installments in Nash's Pall mall, Feb.-July 1930)

(Pub. abroad in Nash's Pall mall magazine, Mar. 1935) (In Hearst's international-cosmopolitan, Mar. 1935)

(Pub. abroad as Butterflies in Nash's Pall-mall magazine, Apr. 1935)

(In Hearst's international-cosmopolitan, Apr. 1936) (Pub. abroad in Nash's Pall Mall magazine, Oct. 1935) ยฉ 18Sep35, AI-20763; 10Mar36, B293542.

(Pub. abroad in Nash's pall mall magazine, Dec. 1935-May 1936.

(Pub. abroad as Further experiences of George Sherston in Nash's Pall Mall magazine, June-Aug. 1936)

(In Nash's Pall Mall magazine, June 1937) ยฉ 26May37, AI-22942; 31Aug37, A109282.

(In Nash's Pall Mall magazine, July 1937. Illustrated by W. Smithson Broadhead) ยฉ 25Jun37, AI-22972; 31Aug37; A109282.

Ogden Nash's Musical zoo for voice and piano.

Ogden Nash's Musical zoo for voice and piano.

The Letters entitled 'FROM TIDEWAY TO TIDEWAY' were published originally in The Times; those entitled 'LETTERS TO THE FAMILY' in The Morning Post; and those entitled 'EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS' in Nash's Magazine.

The King's Bath, the great bathing place of the fashionable world in Nash's day, is open to the air, and may be seen from one of the windows of the corridor.

BATH (54), the largest town in Somerset, on the Avon; a cathedral city; a place of fashionable resort from the time of the Romans, on account of its hot baths and mineral waters, of which there are six springs; it was from 1704 to 1750 the scene of Beau Nash's triumphs; has a number of educational and other institutions, and a fine public park.