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81 examples of  ny  in sentences

81 examples of ny in sentences

(That is to say- something pun-ny.)

The official organ of the Royal Yacht Club, the Royal Jockey Club, and all representative Swedish sport clubs, is the Ny Tidning för Idrott, which is owned by Count Clarence von Rosen, one of the grandsons of the late Mrs. Bloomfield Moore, of Philadelphia.

Ny Tidning för Idrott has a regular correspondent in America.

But to the pray whenas he drew more ny, His bloody rage aswaged with remorse,

Soone as the royall virgin he did spy, With gaping mouth at her ran greedily, To have att once devoured her tender corse; But to the pray when as he drew more ny, His bloody rage aswaged with remorse, And with the sight amazd, forgat his furious forse.

[Greek: fnr] may, perhaps be read phi ny (as Latinised spelling of [Greek: nu]), , or finirô.

] Wil-lie was of an in-dus-tri-ous mind, and did not love to sit i-dle when e-ven his ti-ny strength might be used to some end.

dear mo-ther, I must be start-ing;" but he did do it at last, al-though it was af-ter ma-ny strug-gles to keep down the beat-ings of his heart.

His mo-ther heard him with a be-wil-der-ed look, as if she heard the pro-po-sal for the first time; and her grief burst forth with un-con-trol-la-ble vi-o-lence as she threw her arms round his neck with an a-go-ny on-ly known to a fond mo-ther.

He had not been ma-ny mi-nutes in-dul-ging in his grief, when he felt him-self gent-ly lift-ed from the ground by a gi-gan-tic hand, which pass-ed him high a-bove the threat-en-ing wa-ters, and pla-ced him in safe-ty on the op-po-site bank.

"Here, sure-ly, is some-thing to be done," thought he; so he leapt up the steps, and tri-ed to raise the knock-er, but it was too hea-vy for his pu-ny strength.

Wil-lie wise-ly kept his charge upon the moun-tain's side un-til the wa-ters had in some de-gree sub-si-ded; but he was a-larm-ed when he de-scend-ed in-to the val-leys to find that, in ma-ny pla-ces, the wa-ter was im-pass-a-ble to his charge.

Those gi-ant hands have been known to ma-ny: their pow-er is e-nor-mous; they al-ways as-sist the will-ing and the good; the re-ward they be-stow is cer-tain; they are the pow-er-ful hands of In-dus-try.

And in the sun-ny gar-den beds Gay a-co-nites are show-ing, And snow-drops bend their grace-ful heads, And cro-cus-es are glow-ing.

"Dear lit-tle Snap, you fun-ny pup

See how na-ture now re-joices In this sun-ny month of May; Still to God from all its voices Giv-ing prais-es day by day.

So, with Na-ture still con-fess-ing His great good-ness, let us pay Grate-ful hom-age for each bless-ing Of this sun-ny month of May.

[Illustration: We all at Mon-keys love to gaze, And watch their fun-ny tricks and ways.]

[Illustration: A bird so fool-ish is the Nod-dy, It may be caught by a-ny-bo-dy.]

See where the spread-ing beech has made Be-neath its boughs a plea-sant shade To screen them from the sun; There George, and Anne, and Ma-ry play, Or read up-on each sun-ny day, When all their tasks are done.

In the following year Hamsun astonished his critics with two books, Ny Jord (New Ground) and Redaktör Lynge, both equally unlike his previous work.

Ny Jord gives an unflattering picture of the academic, literary, and artistic youth of the capital, idlers for the most part, arrogant, unscrupulous, self-important, and full of disdain for the mere citizens and merchants whose simple honesty and kindliness are laughed at or exploited by the newly dominant representatives of culture.

"I 've tuck up more 'n a hundred niggers fer stealin', Kurnel, an' I never seed one yit that did n' 'ny it ter the las'.

"Oh! Tom," she cried, "is a-ny-thing the matter?" "My knee," groaned Tom, "it hurts aw-ful-ly.

Quiet people were beginning to express some dissatisfaction with the noise made by these fellows, who, however, kept pretty much by themselves, as yet, and had got only to the musical stage of the proceedings, chorusing with unearthly yells a song contributed to the harmony of the afternoon by the first ruffian, the burden of which ran, "When this old hat was ny-oo, my boys, When this old hat was ny-oo-ooo!"

Quiet people were beginning to express some dissatisfaction with the noise made by these fellows, who, however, kept pretty much by themselves, as yet, and had got only to the musical stage of the proceedings, chorusing with unearthly yells a song contributed to the harmony of the afternoon by the first ruffian, the burden of which ran, "When this old hat was ny-oo, my boys, When this old hat was ny-oo-ooo!"

The terrific scene enacted so directly before his eyes, produced an effect on the Albon-ny man, who consented to haul aft his main-sheet, lower his studding-sail and top-sail, come by the wind, stand across to the Wallingford, heave-to, and lower a boat.

At about seven o'clock we went to ny husband's home at Perry, Georgia.

Correct the division of the following words, so as to convey no wrong idea of their pronunciation: "ar-mo-ry, ar-te-ry, butch-er-y, cook-e-ry, eb-o-ny, em-e-ry, ev-e-ry, fel-o-ny, fop-pe-ry, flip-pe-ry, gal-le-ry, his-to-ry, liv-e-ry.

Correct the division of the following words, so as to convey no wrong idea of their pronunciation: "ar-mo-ry, ar-te-ry, butch-er-y, cook-e-ry, eb-o-ny, em-e-ry, ev-e-ry, fel-o-ny, fop-pe-ry, flip-pe-ry, gal-le-ry, his-to-ry, liv-e-ry.

Correct the division of the following words, with a proper regard to Rules 1st and 3d: "a-scribe, bland-ish, bran-chy, clou-dy, dus-ty, drea-ry, eve-ning, faul-ty, fil-thy, fros-ty, gau-dy, gloo-my, heal-thy, hear-ken, hear-ty, hoa-ry, lea-ky, loung-er, mar-shy, migh-ty, mil-ky, naugh-ty, pas-sing, pit-cher, rea-dy, roc-ky, spee-dy, stea-dy, stor-my, thirs-ty, thor-ny, trus-ty, ves-try, wes-tern, weal-thy.

2. Correct Sears, in the division of the following words: "A-quil-a, hear-ty, drea-ry, wor-my, hai-ry, thor-ny, phil-os-o-phy, dis-cov-e-ry, re-cov-e-ry, ad-diti-on, am-biti-on, au-spici-ous, fac-titi-ous, fla-giti-ous, fru-iti-on, sol-stiti-al, ab-o-liti-on.

3. Correct Bradley, in the division of the following words: "Jes-ter, rai-ny, forg-e-ry, fin-e-ry, spic-e-ry, brib-e-ry, groc-e-ry, chi-can-e-ry, fer-riage, line-age, cri-ed, tri-ed, -ed, slic-ed, forc-ed, pledg-ed, sav-ed, dup-ed, strip-ed, touch-ed, trounc-ed."Improved Spelling-Book: Windsor, 1815.

The principal figures of Rhetoric are sixteen; namely, Sim'-i-le, Met'-a-phor, Al'-le-gor-y, Me-ton'-y-my, Syn-ec'-do-che, Hy-per'-bo-le, Vis'-ion, A-pos'-tro-phe, Per-son'-i-fi-ca'-tion, Er-o-te'-sis, Ec-pho-ne'-sis, An-tith'-e-sis, Cli'-max, I'-ro-ny, A-poph'-a-sis, and On-o-ma-to-poe'-ia.

He didn' hab no wife, no chile, no frien's, no marsterhe'd be'n willin' ernuff to git 'long widout a marster, w'en he had one, but it 'peared lak a sin fer his own marster ter 'ny 'im an' cas' 'im off dat-a-way.

To the Promissory Land, I: NY to LA.

(In The Evening telegram, Herkimer, NY, Oct. 27, 1947) © 27Oct47; B5-2383.

By Charles I. White, revised & edited by the Sisters of Charity of Mount Saint Vincent-on-Hudson, NY, foreword by Amleto Giovanni Cicognani, introd.

(In Long Island (NY) Sunday press, Jan. 29, 1950) © 29Jan50; B5-13223.

To the Promissory Land, I: NY to LA.

(In The Evening telegram, Herkimer, NY, Oct. 27, 1947) © 27Oct47; B5-2383.

By Charles I. White, revised & edited by the Sisters of Charity of Mount Saint Vincent-on-Hudson, NY, foreword by Amleto Giovanni Cicognani, introd.

(In Long Island (NY) Sunday press, Jan. 29, 1950) © 29Jan50; B5-13223.

A fun-ny old fel-low is Win-ter, I trow, A mer-ry old fel-low for glee: He paints all the no-ses a beau-ti-ful hue, He counts all our fin-gers, and pinch-es them too; Our toes he gets hold of through stock-ing and shoe; For a fun-ny old fel-low is he.

A fun-ny old fel-low is Win-ter, I trow, A mer-ry old fel-low for glee: He paints all the no-ses a beau-ti-ful hue, He counts all our fin-gers, and pinch-es them too; Our toes he gets hold of through stock-ing and shoe; For a fun-ny old fel-low is he.

Both were fond of pets and both played so much with A-grip-pa that he grew rath-er la-zy and did not try to catch ma-ny mice.

" The boy went glad-ly, and on the way Frank asked him ma-ny ques-tions.

He had a good ma-ny things to do: to help take care of the chick-ens, the sheep and lambs, the cows and horses; and be-sides all this, he went to school, and with all the other boys, had great fun at coast-ing and skat-ing when school was out.

Believing that the procreative and productive powers of nature might be conceived to exist in the same individual, they made the older of their deities hermaphrodite, and used the term [Greek: a)r)r(enothe/lys], or man-virgin, to denote the union of the two sexes in the same divine person.[80] Thus, in one of the Orphic Hymns, we find this line: [Greek: Zey\s a)/rsên ge/neto, Zey\s a)/mbrotos e)/Pleto ny/mphê

ny part of the German line he has only to call up the eighteen-pounders and it is sent as promptly as the pressure of a button brings a pitcher of iced- water to a room in a first-class hotel.

Vous ne hocherez la teste, vous ne remuerez point les jambes, ny ne roüillerez les yeux, ne froncerez point les sourcils, ou tordrez la bouche.

Que vos ongles ne soient point replis d'ordures, ny trop longs.

Au contraire, qu'il soil ouuert & tranquille, mais qu'il ne soit pas trop épanoüy de joye dans les affaires serieuses, ny trop retiré par vne grauité affectée dans la conversation ordinaire & familiere de la vie humaine.

7. Ne vous amusez point aux equiuoques ny en matiere importante, ny en choses honteuses.

7. Ne vous amusez point aux equiuoques ny en matiere importante, ny en choses honteuses.

Et prenez bien garde aussi en quel lieu vous vous assoirez, vous vous mettrez à genoux, vous vous accouderez, que le lieu ne soit point malpropre, ny reply d'immondices.

Ne tenez point vostre mouchoir à la main, ou pendu à vostre bouche, ny à vostre ceinture, ny sous vostre aiselle, ny sur vostre espaule, ou caché sous vostre robbe.

Ne tenez point vostre mouchoir à la main, ou pendu à vostre bouche, ny à vostre ceinture, ny sous vostre aiselle, ny sur vostre espaule, ou caché sous vostre robbe.

Ne tenez point vostre mouchoir à la main, ou pendu à vostre bouche, ny à vostre ceinture, ny sous vostre aiselle, ny sur vostre espaule, ou caché sous vostre robbe.

Enfin que ceux qui l'enuironnent, viennent tousiours à se détourner de son costé & en mesme temps que luy, non point deuant ny apres; puis qu'il est comme le but de la promenade.

2. Vne personne bien nourrie ne s'amuse iamais à faire parade de ses belles actions, de son esprit, de sa vertu, & de ses autres bonnes & loüables qualitez, au cõtraire il ne faut iamais s'entretenir auec les autres de sa haute naissance, ou de la Noblesse de ses parents, de ses richesses, ny de ses grandeurs, si l'on n'y est contrainct.

Si deux personnes out quelque chose à decider ensemble, ne prenez le party ny de l'vn, ny de l'autre, si quelque grãde raison ne vous y oblige.

Si deux personnes out quelque chose à decider ensemble, ne prenez le party ny de l'vn, ny de l'autre, si quelque grãde raison ne vous y oblige.

Et prenez à tâche d'obseruer en vos discours les regles de l'honnesteté & de la modestie; & vous gardez bien de ces contes vn peu trop libres; ne les faites ny en l'oreille d'vn autre, ny ne les poussez par jeu auec profusion. N'employez

Et prenez à tâche d'obseruer en vos discours les regles de l'honnesteté & de la modestie; & vous gardez bien de ces contes vn peu trop libres; ne les faites ny en l'oreille d'vn autre, ny ne les poussez par jeu auec profusion. N'employez

Dans l'entretien ordinaire, n'allez point chercher de periphrases, point de subtilitez, ny de figures.

Ne monstrez nullement d'avoir pris plaisir à la viande, ou au vin; mais si celuy que vous traittez, vous en demande vostre goust, vous pourrez luy respondre avec modestie & prudence: beaucoup moins faut il blasmer les viandes, ou en demander d'autres, ny dauantage.

Ne boiuez point trop lentement ny trop à la haste, ny comme en maschant le vin, ny trop souuent ny sans eau, car c'est à faire aux yvrognes.

Ne boiuez point trop lentement ny trop à la haste, ny comme en maschant le vin, ny trop souuent ny sans eau, car c'est à faire aux yvrognes.

Ne boiuez point trop lentement ny trop à la haste, ny comme en maschant le vin, ny trop souuent ny sans eau, car c'est à faire aux yvrognes.

Ne boiuez point trop lentement ny trop à la haste, ny comme en maschant le vin, ny trop souuent ny sans eau, car c'est à faire aux yvrognes.

Deuant & apres que vous aurez beu, effuyez-vous les lévres, & ne respirez pas auec trop grand bruit, ny alors, ny iamais, car c'est vne chose bien inciuile.

Deuant & apres que vous aurez beu, effuyez-vous les lévres, & ne respirez pas auec trop grand bruit, ny alors, ny iamais, car c'est vne chose bien inciuile.

Ne vous nettoyez pas les dents auec la nappe, ou la seruiette, ny auec le doigt, la fourchette, ou le cousteau.

Mim. Cheeks : Tac-cal : - : Ny-a-luck : Yarrin : - : - : - : -.

In the introduction to his famous romance d'Urfé wrote in answer to objectors: 'Responds leur, ma Bergere, que pour peu qu'ils ayent connoissance de toy, ils sçauront que tu n'es pas, ny celles aussi qui te suivent, de ces Bergeres necessiteuses, qui pour gaigner leur vie conduisent les troupeaux aux pasturages; mais que vous n'avez toutes pris cette condition que pour vivre plus doucement et sans contrainte.'

Brown, Lawrence R., The Might of the West, NY.:

War of, 208. BRIT'TA-NY.

Manuscript of "Gudrun," 22, 23; Von Otterdingen a, 53; literature, 53; language, Eckewart's fidelity proverbial in, 70; version of Roland legend, 130; Wagner a, 182; more than eighteen versions of Frithiof saga in, 246. GER'MA-NY.

Lüdeger king of, 56; led by Hengist, 208; Arthur wars against, 217. SAX'O-NY.

" In Poor Robin's Almanack, 1676, the drawing of Valentines is thus alluded to: "Now Andrew, Antho- Ny, and William, For Valentines draw Prue, Kate, Jilian." Gay makes mention of a method of choosing Valentines in his time, viz.