Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
517 examples of  parsonage  in sentences

517 examples of parsonage in sentences

He did not speak until the car stopped at the gate of the little unpainted parsonage beside the white, weather-boarded church.

A moment later Ophelia and Old Heck, both much embarrassed but tremulously happy, stepped inside the door of the parsonage.

And she went to the parsonage, and begged to be taken there as a servant.

This was the common tenet and practice of Poland, as Cromerus observed not long since, in the first book of his history; their universities were generally base, not a philosopher, a mathematician, an antiquary, &c., to be found of any note amongst them, because they had no set reward or stipend, but every man betook himself to divinity, hoc solum in votis habens, opimum sacerdotium, a good parsonage was their aim.

If by this price of the expense of time, our bodies and spirits, our substance and patrimonies, we cannot purchase those small rewards, which are ours by law, and the right of inheritance, a poor parsonage, or a vicarage of 50l.

With cheerful spirit paid; each pew In decent order filled; no noise Loud intervene to drown the voice, Learning, or wisdom of the Teacher; Impressive be the Sacred Preacher, And strict his notes on holy page; May young and old from age to age Salute, and still point out, "The good man's Parsonage!"] LETTER 510 CHARLES LAMB TO JAMES GILLMAN

Among the few visitors who disturbed the repose of Daresbury Parsonage was Mr. Durnford, afterwards Bishop of Chichester, with whom Mr. Dodgson had formed a close friendship.

The ladies of that congregation were accustomed to meet weekly at the parsonage to sew for those in need.

He gathered a number of our members with him, and tried hard to take our parsonage, but did not succeed.

Impressive be the Sacred Preacher, And strict his notes on holy page; May young and old from age to age Salute, and still point out, 'The good man's Parsonage!' TO THE BOOK Little Casket!

The marriage service was performed by the Reverend Mallett at the parsonage, and was attended by only a few chosen friends.

While I write this I am in the kitchen of the Parsonage, Haworth; Tabby, the servant, is washing up the breakfast things, and Anne, my youngest sister (Maria was my eldest), is kneeling on a chair, looking at some cakes, which Tabby has been baking for us."

And while it was agreed on all hands that Rochester was incredible with his easy references to Cรฉline and Giacinta and Clara, still more incredible was it that a young woman in a country parsonage should have realized so much as the existence of Clara and Giacinta and Cรฉline.

Frontier parsonage: the letters of Olaus Fredrik Duus, Norwegian pastor in Wisconsin, 1855-1858.

"From thence we decamped to stay half a year with Mr. Fetherston, a clergyman, about seven miles from Wicklow, who, being a relative of my mother's, invited us to his parsonage at Animo."

Invalid from the first, it had doubtless been weakened by the hardships of Sterne's early years, and yet further, perhaps, by the excitements and dissipations of his London life; nor was the change from the gaieties of the capital to hard literary labour in a country parsonage calculated to benefit him as much as it might others.

Shandy Hall, as he christened his pretty parsonage at Coxwold, and as the house, still standing, is called to this day, soon became irksome to him.

In the third or fourth week of May Sterne quitted Paris; and after a stay of a few weeks in London he returned to the Yorkshire parsonage, from which he had been absent some thirty months.

His parsonage-house at Button had just been burnt down through the carelessness of one of his curate's household, with a loss to Sterne of some 350l.

By the Author of 'Amy Herbert,' 'Lancton Parsonage,' &c. Fcap.

Joe drove up to the church with Algy Soames, it not having been thought discreet that he should enter the parsonage on that morning, though he had been there nearly every day through the winter.

But Harry was to be the future Prosper of the county; to assume at some future time the family name; and there was undoubtedly present to them all at the parsonage a feeling that Harry Annesley Prosper would loom in future years a bigger squire than the parish had ever known before.

And Joe had brought tidings of the bet to the parsonage, so that there had been much commotion on the subject.

At two o'clock a night-light was still burning in the parsonage, and this was of course a hindrance to the need-fire.

District Parsonage.

They were accordingly opened out in the rooms of the vacant Parsonage, and, when not otherwise employed, I installed myself as a salesman of merchandise.

During this year the building was completed, and the old Church changed into a Parsonage.

It would greatly aid the Pastor in his work, if all new-comers would immediately report themselves at the Parsonage or the Church.

A Church had now been built at Lamartine, the centre of the charge, and also a Parsonage.

At the present writing, Fall River holds a most respectable rank as a charge, has a good Church, and a convenient Parsonage.

Passing down Main Street, we visited the Church, a building of respectable size and comparatively new, and passing down still further into the borders of what was formerly known as Ceresco proper, we found the Parsonage.

At Ripon, the Sabbath having passed, steps were taken to place the Parsonage in readiness to receive the Pastor's family.

The Parsonage was built by Rev. D.O. Jones in 1862.

On the third day of November, a happy group were met at the Parsonage, to celebrate the marriage of our second daughter, Laura Eunice, and Mr. Jesse Smith, of Fond du Lac.

The entire cost of buildings and grounds, including the Parsonage, was sixty thousand dollars.

The entertainment was given in the evening in the Parsonage, and was attended by about one hundred persons.

The new plan succeeded admirably, giving to the station, at the end of the first quarter of the year, the extraordinary record of having fully paid the Pastor's salary, and every other claim for current expenses, besides liquidating several bills for improvements on the Church and Parsonage.

He wrung her hand and kissed it, forgetting to give her the pattern, and Anne, still stunned, walked back to the parsonage, her one thought how to control herself so as to guard Charles's secret.

This denomination Mr. Fish charges with an attempt to usurp the parsonage, wood-land and the Meeting-house; he denounces, as a "flagrant act," the attempt of the Indians to obtain the use of their own Meeting-house, and appeals to the sympathies of the whole civilized community to maintain by law the Congregational worship, which, he says, "is the most ancient form of religious worship there!"

and to be holden on the Parsonage, and in the vicinity of the Meeting-house,

You have no pretence for such a measure; and if you persist in your purpose to hold such Meeting, either near the Meeting-house, or on any part of the Parsonage allotment, you must consider yourself responsible for the consequences.

Soon after this, the Selectmen, one of whom was a member of my church, applied to Mr. Fish respecting holding the Camp-meeting on the parsonage.

I consent, (I say,) on the following conditions, viz: That you undertake that no damage come upon the parsonage property, either wood land, or Meeting-house; that no attempt be made to occupy the Meeting-house; that there be no attempt on the Sabbath, or any other day, to interrupt the customary worship at the Meeting-house, and, that peace, order, and quietude be maintained during the time of the Camp-meeting.

OPINION AS TO THE TITLE REV. PHINEAS FISH HAS TO THE PARSONAGE, SO CALLED, IN MARSHPEE.

The first act of the General Court which interfered with the right of the Indians to sell their own lands, all of which they owned in common in Marshpee Plantation, (including what is now called the parsonage,) was in 1650, which provides that no person shall buy land of any Indian without license of the General Court.

Their own lands then were the commons, including the parsonage.

In 1763, Marshpee was incorporated as a District, including the land now called the parsonage.

In this interval between 1766 and 1788, the only transaction on which Mr. Fish can found any claim to the parsonage look place.

We now come to the first evidence of any thing relating to the parsonage land being set apart from the common land.

DEED OF MARSHPEE PARSONAGE.

The professed object was to set apart 400 acres, of the common land, lying in Marshpee, "and being Indian property," for a parsonage, forever.

The parsonage was their property then.

The General Court profess to confirm and render valid the deed of Lot Nye and others, but they say that this four hundred acres "shall remain forever as a parsonage for the use and benefit of a Congregational gospel minister, as expressed in their said deed.

This is the true history of the parsonage and Meeting-house now wrongfully held by Mr. Fish.

In this mode, by indicting the white men employed by Mr. Fish, to cut and carry off wood, the question could be tried, which is simply whether the fee of the parsonage is in the Indians, or whether it is in Mr. Fish, who never had any deed of it in any way.

The parsonage was common land in 1783.

The District Attorney on ascertaining that the wood was taken from the parsonage, so called, undertook to decide the whole question, before it went to the court, as it is stated to us, and without any examination as to Mr. Fish's title, refused to act upon the complaint.

It should be understood that the Committee who reported the act of 1834, giving the new law to the Indians, did not decide any question touching the parsonage.

The Committee of the Legislature, who had in charge the Marshpee business, intentionally avoided expressing any opinion in regard to the tenure by which Mr. Fish held the parsonage.

In 1809, the General Court confirmed this grant of a parsonage, "to be held forever for a Congregational Gospel Minister."

We found Mr. Fish in possession of the parsonage, as such a minister.

But whether by virtue of said grant, and his settlement at Marshpee he could hold the parsonage, as a sole corporation, we regarded it as a question of purely a judicial character, and one with which it was "not expedient," and might we not have added proper, "for the Legislature to interfere."

I am entirely satisfied with the course which the Committee took in relation to the parsonage; and the circumstance that questions are now agitated in relation to it, show that in one particular, at least, the Committee acted judiciously.

We left the parsonage precisely as we found it; leaving to another branch of the government the appropriate responsibility of settling all questions growing out of the grant of 1783, the confirmation of 1809, and the settlement of Mr. Fish.

I received a letter from Mr. Fish some time since, in which he expressed some apprehensions that an attempt would be made by the natives to take possession of the Meeting-house, parsonage, &c. His letter enclosed rather a singular communication, signed by the Selectmen of Marshpee.

That they intended to leave the parsonage as they found it, without undertaking to limit or modify the effect of former acts.

That the appropriate mode for the natives to ascertain their rights to, or to obtain possession of, the parsonage, &c. was by resorting to the courts.

The Legislature having thus left the question, to be decided by the Courts, if Mr. Fish insists on holding the parsonage, the inquiry must arise on legal principles, how was Mr. Fish settled in Marshpee, and by what right does he, as a sole corporation, or otherwise, hold the parsonage, as an allotment set apart forever for the support of a Congregational minister, in Marshpee?

The Legislature having thus left the question, to be decided by the Courts, if Mr. Fish insists on holding the parsonage, the inquiry must arise on legal principles, how was Mr. Fish settled in Marshpee, and by what right does he, as a sole corporation, or otherwise, hold the parsonage, as an allotment set apart forever for the support of a Congregational minister, in Marshpee?

The Overseers permitted him to take possession of the Meeting-house and the parsonage land, so called, and it is understood that they consented he should cut the annual growth of the wood off the parsonage.

The Overseers permitted him to take possession of the Meeting-house and the parsonage land, so called, and it is understood that they consented he should cut the annual growth of the wood off the parsonage.

How then, could the Overseers grant for life to Mr. Fish the improvement of the parsonage and Meeting-house?

They might have given it to him from year to year, while they were in office, but on the abolition of the Overseers, in 1834, and a restoration of civil rights to the owners of the fee of the parsonage, the Marshpee Proprietors, how could Mr. Fish continue to hold the parsonage against their will?

They might have given it to him from year to year, while they were in office, but on the abolition of the Overseers, in 1834, and a restoration of civil rights to the owners of the fee of the parsonage, the Marshpee Proprietors, how could Mr. Fish continue to hold the parsonage against their will?

"A minister of a parish seized of lands in its right as parsonage lands, is a sole corporation, and on a vacancy, the parish is entitled to the profits;"

Mr. Fish is not seized of a parsonage in right of any parish or religious society, and therefore he cannot be a sole corporation.

The Marshpee Indians were minors in law, and there was no legal parish to settle a minister, or to hold a parsonage, and no one to make contracts as such.

If that deed and the subsequent act of 1809, conveyed any thing, the conveyance was for the use of the inhabitants as a parsonage, there being no parish in Marshpee, distinct from the Plantation.

Neither has Mr. Fish, even if he had been legally settled, any just right, under the deed of 1783, to take the whole parsonage, because that deed states the principal object of the sequestration of the land to be, for the important purpose of promoting the gospel in Marshpee, and merely referred to the only worship then known there, which was Congregational.

When Mr. Fish went there in 1811, there was a Baptist church, and they objected to his taking possession of the parsonage.

Neither can a parish convey a parsonage to a minister to be held by him in his personal right.

By this decision, the Baptist or Methodist church in Marshpee have as good claim to the parsonage as Mr. Fish has.

The dedication, or whatever it may be called, of Marshpee parsonage, was made by Lot Nye, &c. in 1783, and confirmed in 1809, by the General Court.

Whoever settled him there, for the Indians did not, made no stipulation as to the income of the parsonage, which could bind the Plantation.

The society to which Mr. Fish was sent to preach, took no notice of the parsonage, nor did the Proprietors of Marshpee, hence Mr. Fish cannot hold the proceeds of the parsonage by right of succession, or by stipulation, either from the society or the Marshpee Proprietors, and therefore the Proprietors of Marshpee are entitled to the parsonage.

The society to which Mr. Fish was sent to preach, took no notice of the parsonage, nor did the Proprietors of Marshpee, hence Mr. Fish cannot hold the proceeds of the parsonage by right of succession, or by stipulation, either from the society or the Marshpee Proprietors, and therefore the Proprietors of Marshpee are entitled to the parsonage.

The society to which Mr. Fish was sent to preach, took no notice of the parsonage, nor did the Proprietors of Marshpee, hence Mr. Fish cannot hold the proceeds of the parsonage by right of succession, or by stipulation, either from the society or the Marshpee Proprietors, and therefore the Proprietors of Marshpee are entitled to the parsonage.

There is one other consideration that might legally deprive Mr. Fish of his rights in the parsonage, even if he acquired any by the transaction in 1811, which is denied.

But if Mr. Fish claims to hold the parsonage by the "laws," he must be governed by the decision of the Court in the celebrated case of Burr, vs. the first parish in Sandwich.

He was placed over them by others, and the Indians are now compelled either to lose all the benefits of their own parsonage, or to hear a man in whose doctrines they do not believe, and whom they cannot consent to take as their spiritual teacher.

Upon a full investigation into this branch of the inquiry, there seems to be no legal or equitable ground, on which Mr. Fish can claim to hold the parsonage and Meeting-house against the Proprietors, and he must therefore, be regarded as a trespasser, liable to be ejected, and the men he employs to cut and cart wood from the plantation, are liable to indictment under the new law of 1834.

Mr. Crocker of course, lost all he had furnished to the old Queen, and in this respect, his case was harder than it would be, were Mr. Fish dispossessed of the parsonage, after enjoying it for twenty-four years, without any title thereto.

It would he difficult for any lawyer to show why Crocker's deed confirmed by the General Court, should have been set aside in 1798, and Lot Nye's deed, of the parsonage, be held valid in 1834.

Received about 150 dollars per year from the wood-land of the parsonage.

Mr. Fish has 50 or 60 acres of pasture, East of the river, besides the parsonage.

* I have thus given my views of the law and the facts, touching the parsonage in Marshpee, in order that the Indians and their Selectmen who have desired legal advice on the subject, may fully understand their rights.

The Courts at Barnstable, it is said, are closed to them, in the way pointed out by the law, the District Attorney refusing to prosecute the men who cut wood on the parsonage.

If he cannot do so, I hope he will permit the title of the parsonage to be brought before the Court, under an indictment for cutting wood contrary to the act of 1834.

I think it as important to him as to the Indians, that the title to the parsonage should be settled, for there will be feuds, and divisions, and strifes, as long as that property remains as it now is, wrongfully taken and withheld from the Indians, to support an "ESTABLISHED CHURCH," in Marshpee.

I have always been desirous that Mr. Fish should not be disturbed in his house lot, and for my own part, it would give me pleasure, should the Indians, immediately, on getting legal possession of their own parsonage, unanimously invite him to settle over them.