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246 examples of  pindar  in sentences

246 examples of pindar in sentences

From Livadia the travellers proceeded to Thebes, visited the cave of Trophonius, Diana's fountain, the so-called ruins of Pindar's house, and the field of Cheronea, crossed Cithaeron, and on Christmas, 1809, arrived before the defile, near the ruins of Phyle, where, he had his first glimpse of Athens, which evoked the famous lines: Ancient of days, august Athena!

I think this vein may be further opened; Peter Pindar hath very prettily apostrophized a fly; Burns hath his mouse and his louse; Coleridge, less successfully, hath made overtures of intimacy to a jackass,therein only following at unresembling distance Sterne and greater Cervantes.

This war I think was closed by the publication of "The Bucktail Bards," as the little volume is called, which contains The State Triumvirate, a Political Tale, and the Epistles of Brevet Major Pindar Puff.

"' 'As an instance of the niceness of his taste, though he praised West's translation of Pindar, he pointed out the following passage as faulty, by expressing a circumstance so minute as to detract from the general dignity which should prevail: "Down then from thy glittering nail, Take, O Muse, thy Dorian lyre.'

In his translations from Pindar, he [will not be denied to have reached] found the art of reaching all the obscurity of the Theban bard.' Various Readings in the Life of CONGREVE.

Wilkie was to be the Homer, Blacklock the Pindar, and Home the Shakespeare or something still greater of his country.'

When Mr. Wilkes, in his days of tumultuous opposition, was borne upon the shoulders of the mob, Mr. Burke (as Mr. Wilkes told me himself, with classical admiration,) applied to him what Horace says of Pindar, ...numerisque fertur LEGE solutis.

The 'contemptible scribbler' was, I believe, John Wolcot, better known by his assumed name of Peter Pindar.

The triumphal lyrics of Pindar himself were very far from being those spontaneous and enthusiastic tributes to the prowess of his heroes, which the vulgar receive them for.

But reflecting that what Pindar would give for his money was a draft upon universal fame and immortality, while the statue might presently be lost, or melted down, or its identity destroyed, his final determination was in favor of the ode,a conclusion which time has justified.

The Elector spared not the house of Pindar.

Bating a few bungling thrusts amid the doggerel of "Peter Pindar," he escaped scathless,gaining, on the other hand, a far more than ordinary proportion of poetical panegyric.

There are also to be mentioned translations from Pindar, Horace, and other classics, for Sharpe's edition of the British Poets, a collection to which he lent editorial aid.

Who has surpassed Pindar in artistic skill?

He was born in Colonus, in the suburbs of Athens, 495 B.C., and was the contemporary of Herodotus, of Pericles, of Pindar, of Phidias, of Socrates, of Cimon, of Euripides,the era of great men, the period of the Peloponnesian War, when everything that was elegant and intellectual culminated at Athens.

If the Romans did not produce a Homer, they can boast of a Virgil; if they had no Pindar, they furnished a Horace; and in satire they transcended the Greeks.

If inferior to Pindar in passion and loftiness, it glows with a more genial humanity and with purer wit.

What Muse but thine can equal hints inspire, And fit the deep-mouthed Pindar to thy lyre; Pindar, whom others, in a laboured strain And forced expression, imitate in vain?

What Muse but thine can equal hints inspire, And fit the deep-mouthed Pindar to thy lyre; Pindar, whom others, in a laboured strain And forced expression, imitate in vain?

The Pindar of Wakefield, a comedy.

On the one hand, there are his egoism, his unncontrollable anger, his perpetual lawsuits, and the last sad tragedy with his children, which suggests King Lear and his daughters; on the other hand there is his steady devotion to the classics and to the cultivation of the deep wisdom of the ancients, which suggests Pindar and Cicero.

" Footnote 161: So called from Pindar, the greatest lyric poet of Greece.

The house still remains; but the inscription unfortunately became effaced; though the following one remains, which was added by his son Virginio: "Sic domus hรฆc Areostea Propitios habeat deos, olim ut Pindarica." Dear to the gods, whatever come to pass, Be Ariosto's house, as Pindar's was.

And that style, we think, is discernible in the works of Pindar and Aeschylus.

* Shortly will be published, THE ODES OF PINDAR, IN ENGLISH VERSE.

Though his diction is rugged, it is like the cup in Pindar, which Telamon stretches out to Alcides, [Greek: chruso pephrkuan], rough with gold, and embost with curious imagery.

His preparations for this edition, together with some notes on Pindar (an edition of which he also meditated), Aristophanes, the Argonautics of Apollonius Rhodius, Demosthenes, and others, remain in the Bodleian.

Before going abroad, he had published (in 1749) his Ode on West's translation of Pindar; and after his return, employed himself in writing papers, chiefly on subjects of criticism, for the Adventurer, and in preparing for the press an edition of Virgil, which (in 1753) he published, together with Pitt's translation of the Aeneid, his own of the Eclogues and Georgies, his notes on the whole, and several essays.

Here having at first revived a little, he soon relapsed, and declining gradually, expired in the eighty-first year of his age, without apparent suffering, in the possession of his intellectual powers, and, according to the tender wish of Pindar for one of his patrons [Greek: huion, psaumi, paristamenon,] in the midst of his children.

It is the right translation of the word by which Pindar has described the ruffling of the wings on the back of Zetes and Calais.

But Darwin could have known nothing of Pindar; and the word may perhaps he found with a similar application in one of our own poets.

"At the same time, upon a motion made by Mr. Oglethorpe, by direction of the committee, it was unanimously resolved to address his Majesty that he would be graciously pleased to direct his Attorney General forthwith to prosecute, in the most effectual manner, the said Thomas Bambridge, John Higgins, James Barnes, William Pindar, John Everett, and Thomas King for their said crimes.

"It was also ordered that the said Bambridge, Higgins, Barnes, Pindar, Everett, and King be committed close prisoners in His Majesty's gaol of Newgate.

A mighty poetical development of the nation would indeed have set aside that almost comic official parallel between the Homeric Iliad and the Ennian Annals as easily as we have set aside the comparison of Karschin with Sappho and of Willamov with Pindar; but no such development took place in Rome.

The catalogue of authors, which this Rev. Gentleman has pleased to specify and recommend, begins with Homer, Hesiod, the Argonautics, ร†schylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Pindar, Theognis, Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius, Diodorus Siculus.

Pindar sadly wants Preface and notes.

[Pindar was Cary's edition, which Moxon had just published.

If any one would judge of the Beauties of Poetry that are to be met with in the Divine Writings, and examine how kindly the Hebrew Manners of Speech mix and incorporate with the English Language; after having perused the Book of Psalms, let him read a literal Translation of Horace or Pindar.

For in the poets there is room not only for Homer (to confine myself to the Greeks), or for Archilochus, or Sophocles, or Pindar, but there is room also for those who are second to them, or even below the second.

What might old Pindar be, if once again The harp and voice were trembling with his strain!

Boswell, Hawkins, Baretti, Chalmers, Peter Pindar, Gifford, Horace Walpole, all had their fling at her.

Four swans sustain a car of silver bright, With heads advanced, and pinions stretched for flight, Here, like some furious prophet, Pindar rode, And seemed to labour with the inspiring God.

Here happy Horace tuned th' Ausonian lyre To sweeter sounds, and tempered Pindar's fire; Pleased with Alcaeus' manly rage t' infuse The softer spirit of the Sapphic Muse.

There is no extraordinary merit in the "Carmen Secculare" as we have it, the only production of Horace which challenges comparison with Pindar; although we are not among those who deem Pindar one of the brightest stars in the Greek heaven.

There is no extraordinary merit in the "Carmen Secculare" as we have it, the only production of Horace which challenges comparison with Pindar; although we are not among those who deem Pindar one of the brightest stars in the Greek heaven.

He read its more recondite authors, such as Pausanias, Athenaeus, Pindar, Lysias, and ร†schylus, with great care, and commenced the preparation of a Table of Greek Chronology, on a very minute and elaborate scale.

[Greek: Phonanta sunetoisin es De to pan hermaeneon Chatizei. PINDAR, Olymp.

[Footnote 3: 'Theban eagle:' Pindar.]

My warmest thanks are due you for sending me the Odes of Pindar in translation; they have given a very pleasant hour of recreation to Riemer and myself.

5. What though the muse her Homer thrones High above all the immortal quire; Nor Pindar's raptures she disowns, Nor hides the plaintive Caean lyre; Alcaeus strikes the tyrant soul with dread, Nor yet is grave Stesichorus unread.

The wealthy merchant, Sir Paul Pindar, had a diamond valued at thirty thousand pounds, which he lent to the king on great occasions, but refused to sell.

CORINNA, a Greek poetess of Boeotia, who gained a victory over Pindar at the public games (fl. B.C. 490). ...

DIP'SODY, the country of the Dipsodes (2 syl), q.v. DIRCร†'AN SWAN, Pindar; so called from Dircรช, a fountain in the neighborhood of Thebes, the poet's birthplace (B.C. 518-442.) DIRLOS or D'YRLOS (Count), a paladin, the embodiment of valor, generosity, and truth.

" Eagle (The Theban), Pindar, a native of Thebes (B.C. 518-442).

Pliny tells us that Alexander, when he besieged Thebes, spared the house in which Pindar the poet was born, out of reverence to his great abilities.

BY SUSAN PINDAR.

My Miss Susan Pindar.

Mr. Watts-Dunton proceeds: "The finest music of ร†schylus, of Pindar, of Shakespeare, of Milton, is after all, only a succession of melodious notes, and in endeavouring to catch the harmonic intent of strophe, antistrophe and epode in the Greek chorus and in the true ode (that of Pindar), we can only succeed by pressing memory into our service."

Mr. Watts-Dunton proceeds: "The finest music of ร†schylus, of Pindar, of Shakespeare, of Milton, is after all, only a succession of melodious notes, and in endeavouring to catch the harmonic intent of strophe, antistrophe and epode in the Greek chorus and in the true ode (that of Pindar), we can only succeed by pressing memory into our service."

Then came the Service Hall, containing frescoes illustrating Homer, by Schnorr, and the Throne Hall, with Schwanthaler's bas-reliefs of the songs of Pindar, on a ground of gold.

Isocrates amongst the Grecian orators, and Cicero, and the younger Pliny, amongst the Romans, have left us their precedents for our security; for I think I need not mention the inimitable Pindar, who stretches on these pinions out of sight, and is carried upward, as it were, into another world.

"In several of the chorusses of Euripides and Sophocles, we have the same kind of lyric poetry as in Pindar."Ib., p. 398.

Indeed, to use the solemn style familiarly, would be, to turn it into burlesque; as when Peter Pindar "telleth what he troweth."

But I am sure my reader is exhausted, even if the volume is not, and I spare him any further examination of these obscure dramas, lest he should say, as Peter Pindar did of Dr. Johnson, that I Set wheels on wheels in motionsuch a clatter!

["The modern world is badly in need of a Pindar.

Alone of the poets, Pindar could do justice to the exploits of the day."The Times.]

"We're badly in need of a Pindar" To fan in these tropical days Our stock of emotional tinder With gusts of tempestuous praise; To foster the flame, not to check it Or let it die suddenly down, In honour of HAWKER and BECKETT, Of ALCOCK and BROWN.

Pindar has embalmed the names of many victors in his Olympic, Pythian, and other odes.

Peter Pindar, v. 415, n. 4. PETERBOROUGH, Charles Mordaunt, Earl of, iv.

Pindar, Johnson asks Boswell to get him a copy, ii. 202; receives it, ii. 205; West's translation, iv.

WESLEY, Mrs. (mother of Charles and John Wesley), i. 46, n. 4. WEST, Gilbert, in the army, iii. 267, n. 1; translation of Pindar, iv.

WITTEMBERG, iii. 122, n, 2. WOFFINGTON, Margaret (Peg), Garrick's tea, iii. 264; sister of Mrs. Cholmondeley, iii. 318, n. 3. WOLCOT, John (Peter Pindar), v. 415, n. 4. WOLFE, General,' choice of difficulties,' v. 146.

Brighter and braver Peter Pindar started, And ranged around him all the lighter-hearted, When Peter Pindar sank into decline, Up from his hole sprang Peter Porcupine" All which is nothing to Us, but what does it lead to? "Him W ... son follow'd" Why those dots, Mr. Landor? "Him W ... son follow'd, of congenial quill, As near the dirt and no less prone to ill.

Brighter and braver Peter Pindar started, And ranged around him all the lighter-hearted, When Peter Pindar sank into decline, Up from his hole sprang Peter Porcupine" All which is nothing to Us, but what does it lead to? "Him W ... son follow'd" Why those dots, Mr. Landor? "Him W ... son follow'd, of congenial quill, As near the dirt and no less prone to ill.

Pindar himself would not, on that subject, have braced one into more nerve and freshness, nor Euripides have inspired into it more tenderness and passion.

But to-night I go up the lake to Pindar's Bield, three miles on; and there I rest and refreshnot here.

In another minute he was forth into the storm, pursuing what remained of his long march to Pindar's Bield.

Some odes of Pindar in new English versions.

Some odes of Pindar in new English versions.

NORWOOD, GILBERT. Pindar.

We have no one to place by Pindar, or the exquisite Theocritus.

Hesiod probably flourished near the end of the seventh century, to which Archilochus and Alcman belong, while in the sixth and fifth centuries a number of names appearlittle more than names, it is true, since of most of them fragments only have come down to usAlcaeus, Mimnermus, Theognis, Sappho, Stesichorus, Anacreon, Ibycus, Bacchylides, Pindar, and others.

A reviewer on the staff of a famous journal once received for his week's task, General Hamley on the Art of War, a three-volume novel, a work on dainty dishes, and a translation of Pindar.

Mr. Oldisworth observes, that he had seen about ten sheets of Pindar translated into English, which, he says, exceeded any thing of that kind, he could ever hope for in our language.

I cannot quit this Head without observing that Pindar was a great Genius of the first Class, who was hurried on by a natural Fire and Impetuosity to vast Conceptions of things and noble Sallies of Imagination.

In short a modern Pindarick Writer, compared with Pindar, is like a Sister among the Camisars compared with Virgil's Sibyl: There is the Distortion, Grimace, and outward Figure, but nothing of that divine Impulse which raises the Mind above its self, and makes the Sounds more than human.

If any one would judge of the Beauties of Poetry that are to be met with in the Divine Writings, and examine how kindly the Hebrew Manners of Speech mix and incorporate with the English Language; after having perused the Book of Psalms, let him read a literal Translation of Horace or Pindar.

At the same time they might well be proud of a queen who "could quote Pindar and Homer in the original and read every morning a portion of Demosthenes, being also the royal mistress of eight languages."

We saw no fizgig, shield, nor boomerang; it is probable that they may have such weapons but did not produce them from a dislike at parting with them; but the knives, spears, and hammers which did not require much labour to manufacture were always ready for barter, particularly the first, but the greater part were, like Peter Pindar's razors, only made for sale.

speak for me, immortal Pindar Cockloft!

Nor old Anacreon, Hesiod, Theocrite, Must we forget, nor Pindar's lofty flight.

BACCHYL`IDES, a Greek lyric poet, 5th century B.C., nephew of Simonides and uncle of Eschylus, a rival of Pindar; only a few fragments of his poems extant.

CHIABRERA, GABRIELLO, an Italian lyric poet, born at Savona; distinguished, especially for his lyrics; surnamed the "Pindar of Italy," Pindar being a Greek poet whom it was his ambition to imitate (1552-1637).

CHIABRERA, GABRIELLO, an Italian lyric poet, born at Savona; distinguished, especially for his lyrics; surnamed the "Pindar of Italy," Pindar being a Greek poet whom it was his ambition to imitate (1552-1637).

WOLCOT, JOHN, better known by his pseudonym Peter Pindar, born in Devonshire; bred to and practised medicine; took orders, and held office in the Church; took eventually to writing satires and lampoons, which spared no one, and could not be bribed into silence; was blind for some years before he died (1738-1819).

But, while Greece retained these relics of savagery, there was something taught at Eleusis which filled minds like Plato's and Pindar's with a happy religious awe.

His proverbial wisdom, and the forms of verse which he often chose, are reputed to have been like Pindar's.

" Hafiz is the prince of Persian poets, and in his extraordinary gifts adds to some of the attributes of Pindar, Anacreon, Horace, and Burns the insight of a mystic, that sometimes affords a deeper glance at Nature than belongs to either of these bards.

In all poetry, Pindar's rule holds,[Greek: sunetois phonei], it speaks to the intelligent; and Hafiz is a poet for poets, whether he write, as sometimes, with a parrot's, or, as at other times, with an eagle's quill.

His business is with the succeeding ages of men, not with all time; but Hyperion might have been written on the morrow of Salamis, and the Odes of Pindar dedicated to George the Fourth.