Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
Do we say   plantar   or  planter

Do we say plantar or planter

plantar 123 occurrences

The Inferior or Plantar Surface, hollowed in the form of a low arch, presents for our inspection two regions, an anterior and a posterior, divided by a well-marked line, the Semilunar Crest, which extends forward in the shape of a semicircle.

The posterior region, lying immediately behind the semilunar crest, shows on each side of a median process a large foramen, the Plantar Foramen.

From this foramen runs the Plantar Groove, a channel, bounded above by the superior edge, and below by the semilunar crest of the bone, which conducts the plantar arteries into the Semilunar Sinus, a well-marked cavity in the interior of the bone.

From this foramen runs the Plantar Groove, a channel, bounded above by the superior edge, and below by the semilunar crest of the bone, which conducts the plantar arteries into the Semilunar Sinus, a well-marked cavity in the interior of the bone.

1, Plantar surface; 2, plantar foramen and plantar groove; 3, semilunar crest; 4, tendinous surface; 5, retrossal processes of the wings.

1, Plantar surface; 2, plantar foramen and plantar groove; 3, semilunar crest; 4, tendinous surface; 5, retrossal processes of the wings.

1, Plantar surface; 2, plantar foramen and plantar groove; 3, semilunar crest; 4, tendinous surface; 5, retrossal processes of the wings.

(AFTER HAÜBNER.) 1, Tendon of flexor perforans; 2, its supporting check-band from the posterior ligament of the carpus; 3, tendon of the flexor perforatus; 4, ring and sheath of the flexor perforatus; 5, widening out of the flexor perforatus to form the plantar aponeurosis; 6, suspensory ligament; 7, reinforcing band from the suspensory ligament to the extensor pedis; 8, the extensor pedis.

1, Reflected cut edges of the perforatus ring and the metacarpo-phalangeal sheath; 2, the perforans tendon; 3, point of insertion of the perforans tendon into the semilunar crest of the os pedis (this widened and thickened extremity of the perforans is known as the plantar aponeurosis).]

On reaching the posterior border of the navicular bone it widens out to form the plantar aponeurosis.

Descending in company with the flexor tendons, and passing behind the carpus and beneath the carpal sheath, it continues its descent, in company with the internal plantar nerve and the internal metacarpal vein, on the inner side of the flexor tendons until just above the fetlock.

From the carpus downwards the large metacarpal artery, the internal metacarpal vein, and the internal plantar nerve are in close relation with each other.

They separate from each other at an acute angle, and pass over the side of the fetlock, one to the inside, the other to the outside, to reach the internal face of the basilar process of the os pedis, where they bifurcate to form the Plantar and Preplantar arteries.

In the whole of their course the digital arteries follow the flexor tendons, and are related in front to the digital vein, and behind to the posterior branch of the plantar nerve.

At the Superior Border of the Lateral Cartilage, the Artery of the Plantar Cushion.

The formation of this last-named artery is completed posteriorly by the before-mentioned branch from the artery of the plantar cushion.

THE PLANTAR (UNGUAL[A]) ARTERY.This, the larger of the two terminals of the digital, may be looked upon as a continuation of the main vessel.

Running along the plantar groove, it gains the plantar foramen.

Running along the plantar groove, it gains the plantar foramen.

The circle of vessels so formed is called the Plantar Arch or the Semilunar Anastomosis.

[Footnote A: The epithet 'ungual' is added by Chauveau to distinguish these arteries from the properly so-called plantar arteriesthe terminal divisions of the posterior tibial artery.]

Efferent vessels emerge from the plantar foraminæ, follow the plantar fissures, and ascend within the basilar processes of the os pedis.

Efferent vessels emerge from the plantar foraminæ, follow the plantar fissures, and ascend within the basilar processes of the os pedis.

The veins of this plexus discharge themselves in two directions: (1) By a central canal or canals running along the bottom of the lateral lacunæ of the plantar cushion to gain the deep layer of the coronary plexus.

THE INTERNAL METACARPAL VEIN, the largest of the three, has relations with the internal metacarpal artery and the internal plantar nerve.

THE EXTERNAL METACARPAL VEIN.This ascends on the external side of the flexor tendons in company with the external plantar nerve.

THE PLANTAR NERVES.These are two in number, and are distinguished as Internal and External.

THE INTERNAL PLANTAR NERVE lies behind and in close contact with the great metacarpal artery during that vessel's course down the region of the cannon.

A point of interest is that it gives off at about the middle of the cannon a branch which bends obliquely downwards and behind the flexor tendons to join its fellow of the opposite sidenamely, the external plantar.

Near the fetlock, at the level of the sesamoids, the internal plantar nerve ends in several digital branches.

THE EXTERNAL PLANTAR NERVE.This holds a position to the outside of the metacarpal region, analogous to that of the internal plantar nerve on the inside of the limb, running down on the external edge of the flexor tendons.

THE EXTERNAL PLANTAR NERVE.This holds a position to the outside of the metacarpal region, analogous to that of the internal plantar nerve on the inside of the limb, running down on the external edge of the flexor tendons.

This is the largest of the three, and may be regarded as the direct continuation of the plantar.

Here it passes with the plantar artery into the interior of the os pedis, and continues its main branch, with the preplantar artery, in the fissure of the same name, to finally furnish supply to the os pedis and the sensitive laminæ.

This consists of two lateral pieces, the LATERAL CARTILAGES or Fibro-cartilages of the pedal bone, united behind and below by the Plantar Cushion.

Below and behind, the internal face of the cartilage is united to the plantar cushion.

The inferior border is attached in front to the basilar and retrossal processes, behind which it blends with the plantar cushion.

2. THE PLANTAR CUSHION on FIBRO-FATTY FROG.Composed of a fibrous meshwork, in the interstices of which are lodged fine elastic and connective fibres and fat cells, this wedge-shaped body occupies the space between the two lateral cartilages, the extremity of the perforans tendon, and the horny frog.

The base of the cushion lies behind, and consists of two lateral masses, the Bulbs of the Plantar Cushion.

The apex is fixed into the plantar surface of the os pedis, in front of its semilunar ridge.

It covers the extremity of the digit as a sock covers the foot, spreading over the insertion of the extensor pedis, the lower half of the external face of the lateral cartilages, the bulbs of the plantar cushion, the pyramidal body, the anterior portion of the plantar surface of the os pedis, and over the anterior face of the same bone.

It covers the extremity of the digit as a sock covers the foot, spreading over the insertion of the extensor pedis, the lower half of the external face of the lateral cartilages, the bulbs of the plantar cushion, the pyramidal body, the anterior portion of the plantar surface of the os pedis, and over the anterior face of the same bone.

It extends from the inner to the outer bulbs of the plantar cushion, and is bounded above by the perioplic ring, and below by the laminæ.

The sensitive laminæ, or podophyllous tissue; 2, the coronary cushion; 3, the perioplic ring; 4, portion of plantar cushion; 5, groove separating perioplic ring from coronary cushion; 6. the sensitive sole.]

Widest at its centre, the cushion narrows towards its extremities, which, arriving at the bulbs of the plantar cushion, bend downwards into the lateral lacunæ of the pyramidal body, where they merge into the velvety tissue of the sole and frog.

[Footnote A: The sensitive frog thinly invests the plantar cushion or fibre-fatty frog, the outline of which is here indicated.

] 2. THE VELVETY TISSUE.This is the portion of the keratogenous membrane covering the plantar surface of the os pedis and the plantar cushion.

] 2. THE VELVETY TISSUE.This is the portion of the keratogenous membrane covering the plantar surface of the os pedis and the plantar cushion.

Its surface may, therefore, be divided into (a) The Sensitive Frog, and (b) The Sensitive Sole. (a) The Sensitive Frog is that part of the velvety tissue moulded on the lower surface of the plantar cushion.

The shape of the plantar cushion has already been described as identical with that of the horny frog.

As its name indicates, this is the portion of the keratogenous membrane that covers the plantar surface of the os pedis.

It will be noticed, too, with the foot lifted, that the wall projects beyond the level of the other structures of the plantar surface, taking upon itself the bearing of the greatest part of the animal's weight.

3. THE FROG.Triangular or pyramidal in shape, the frog bears a close resemblance to the form of the plantar cushion, upon the lower surface of which body it is moulded.

The Superior Face is an exact cast of the lower surface of the plantar cushion.

In a macerated specimen, then, the exposed sensitive structures of the foot exhibit the corium as (1) the Coronary Cushion, fitting into the cutigeral groove; (2) the Sensitive Laminæ, clothing the outer surface of the terminal phalanx, and extending to the bars; (3) the Plantar Cushion, or sensitive frog; and (4) the Sensitive Sole.

We shall readily understand this when we bear in mind the anatomy of the parts concerned, especially that of the plantar cushion.

Repeat the weighting of the hoof, in this second case without frog-pressure, and we shall see at once that we have done away with one of the greatest factors in determining the outward and backward movements of the plantar cushionnamely, the pressure from below on its wedge-shaped mass.

The movement of the plantar cushion will now be downwards as well as backwards; and, seeing that it is attached to the inner aspect of each lateral cartilage, we shall expect these latter, by the downward movement of the plantar cushion, to be drawn inwards.

The movement of the plantar cushion will now be downwards as well as backwards; and, seeing that it is attached to the inner aspect of each lateral cartilage, we shall expect these latter, by the downward movement of the plantar cushion, to be drawn inwards.

In addition to this, the lateral cartilages, together with the plantar and coronary cushions, play the part of a valve to the whole of the veins of the foot.

It is here that the lateral cartilages and the elastic substances of the coronary and plantar cushions step in to supply the deficiency.

Where, though we may have suspected the foot, we have not been able to definitely assure ourselves that there the mischief is to be found, a further method of examination presents itselfnamely, subcutaneous injections of cocaine along the course of the plantar nerves.

In the same manner a prick to the frog that, although deep, is mainly concerned with penetrating the plantar cushion may also be classed as simple.

Here the plantar aponeurosis, the navicular bursa, the navicular bone itself, or the pedal articulation may be injured.

Posterior to the position we have named, the only structure to be injured is the plantar cushion.

(c) Wounding of the Plantar Aponeurosis.

This results from a prick in exactly the same position as that last described, and means that the penetrating object has gone deeper, It may be distinguished from puncture of the plantar aponeurosis alone by the fact that there is an excessive discharge of synovia from the wound.

Pain and accompanying fever is most marked, much more so than when the plantar aponeurosis alone is injured.

As in succession the sensitive sole, the plantar aponeurosis, the navicular bursa, the navicular bone, or the pedal articulation is injured, so with each step deeper of the prick is the severity of the case increased.

When necrosis of the plantar aponeurosis has occurred.

The operation is known as resection of the plantar aponeurosis, or the complete operation for gathered nail.

That the close attachment of the plantar aponeurosis to the navicular bursa, and the nearness of both to the pedal articulation, render penetration of a synovial sac or a joint cavity extremely likely.

Each incision thus made should be carried deep enough to cut through the substance of the plantar cushion.

The plantar cushion itself is then incised in a direction from before backwards, and pulled on by the assistant, so as to expose the plantar aponeurosis.

The plantar cushion itself is then incised in a direction from before backwards, and pulled on by the assistant, so as to expose the plantar aponeurosis.

a, The plantar cushion; b, b, the plantar aponeurosis, or terminal portion of perforans; c, the navicular bone; d, interosseous ligaments of the pedal articulation; e, e, semilunar crest of the os pedis; f, inferior surface of os pedis; g, g, the sensitive laminæ of the bars; h, h, bearing surface of the wall; i, i, the sensitive sole; k, the sensitive frog.]

a, The plantar cushion; b, b, the plantar aponeurosis, or terminal portion of perforans; c, the navicular bone; d, interosseous ligaments of the pedal articulation; e, e, semilunar crest of the os pedis; f, inferior surface of os pedis; g, g, the sensitive laminæ of the bars; h, h, bearing surface of the wall; i, i, the sensitive sole; k, the sensitive frog.]

At the same time it must be remembered that the granulating process of repair is always more rapid upon the plantar cushion and fleshy sole than upon the bone, or upon tendinous or cartilaginous structures.

Professor Cadiot, judging the necessity for the complete operation, performed it on January 14, and spared the plantar cushion as much as possible.

In consequence of the plantar aponeurosis being extensively necrosed, it was advisable to scrape the navicular bone and a part of the semilunar crest.

The navicular bone may be tending to caries; or necrosis of the plantar aponeurosis, all unknown, gradually becoming pronounced.

When placing the body-weight behind, the pressure, instead of falling upon the highly sensitive laminæ, is directed to the follicular and fatty tissues of the plantar cushion: from there, with only a small portion of the sensitive sole intervening, to the horny frog, and from thence to the ground.

Consequent upon the displacement of the bone, the plantar cushion, by reason of the continued pressure thus put upon it, becomes atrophied, while its hinder half is, as it were, squeezed into taking up a position more posterior and higher in the digit than normally it should.

This operation is performed in the same position as is the higher operation of plantar neurectomy, and may be either internal or external.

130.EXTERNAL SEEDY-TOE COMMENCING AT THE PLANTAR BORDER OF THE WALL.]

130 it will be seen that the disease commences at the plantar surface of the toe, and extends upwards and inwards.

This is so when the necrosis is situate in the posterior half of the cartilage, in which case the irritation set up by the disease is confined to the comparatively non-sensitive tissues of the cartilage itself and the fibrous mass of the plantar cushion.

In all probability they are burrowing down along-side the wall to the sole, where, for want of outlet, they are invading the substance of the plantar cushion or the plantar aponeurosis.

In all probability they are burrowing down along-side the wall to the sole, where, for want of outlet, they are invading the substance of the plantar cushion or the plantar aponeurosis.

More often than not, however, it is found that the pus has been liberated too late, and that it has gravitated in the sheath to the extent of affecting the plantar aponeurosis.

Or it may be, of course, that it was in the plantar aponeurosis the disease commenced.

(p. 66) that the chief function of the cartilage was to take concussion received by the plantar cushion and direct the greater part of it outwards and backwards.

Now, with the animal shod, the plantar cushion does not itself, as normally it should, receive concussion.

By the shoeing the frog is lifted from the ground, and the plantar cushion, together with the cartilage, taken largely out of active work.

It is in this way: The secondary effect of loss of ground-pressure upon the frog and plantar cushion is to bring about contraction of the heels.

Such are: Ringbone, especially that form of ringbone known as 'low'; bony deposits on the pedal bone, either on its laminal or plantar surface, or even changes in the navicular bursa.

If the fore-limb is the seat of trouble, either plantar or median neurectomy may be practised; if the hind, then the best results are obtained by section of the posterior tibial.

Hidden within the wings of the os pedis, and protected as it is by its tendinous covering and the yielding substance of the plantar cushion, the navicular bone is even less liable to fracture than either of the other bones of the foot.

Instead of blistering the coronet (or in conjunction with that treatment), the counter-irritant may be applied by passing a seton through the plantar cushion or fibro-fatty frog.

This is shown by the dotted curved line a, b. 1, The navicular bone; 2, the plantar cushion; 3, the os pedis; 4, the perforans tendon.]

planter 934 occurrences

From the first, fortune had smiled upon him, and when, some time after his marriage with the daughter of a wealthy planter, she had come into possession of all her father's estates, he had built the house which for fifteen years he had called home.

Napoleon wore a loose linen coat and a broad brimmed planter's hat, and looked as red as the sangaree, but nowise as comfortable.

Amongst the latter is the squirrel, which is an extensive planter of oaks; nay, it may be regarded as having, in some measure, been one of the creators of the British navy.

When not at his upper plantation or in attendance at the council, he was living the quiet and unassuming life of a planter at Curles, where he entertained his neighbors, and being by nature a lover of the divine rights of man, he boldly denounced the trade laws, the Arlington and Culpepper grants, and the governor for his lukewarmness in defending the frontier against the Indians.

" Now, Stede Bonnet was a planter of high reputation and religious character who, from some sudden and overpowering freshet of wildness in his blood, had given up everything in order to start off pirating in the Caribbean Sea.

So the corn planter, at noon, will do his work with half the expended energy of the early morning: he attains the artistry of motion.

will you persuade me that a man can be the property of a sovereign, a son the property of a father, a wife the property of a husband, a domestic the property of a master, a Negro the property of a planter?"

It is said, that it could not be cultivated with quite the same conveniency and cheapness, as by the labour of slaves; by which means, a pound of sugar, which the planter now sells for sixpence, could not be afforded under sixpence-halfpennyand this is the necessity!

If a planter in the West Indies found himself reduced in his profits, he did not usually dispose of any part of his slaves; and his own gratifications were never given up, so long as there was a possibility of making any retrenchment in the allowance of his slaves.

Mr. Long himself, long resident as a planter, had proved, upon his own estate, that the plough, though so little used in the West Indies, did the service of a hundred slaves, and caused the same ground to produce three hogsheads of sugar, which, when cultivated by slaves, would only produce two.

It became unpleasant for a Northern merchant or traveller to visit a Southern city, and equally unpleasant for a Southern student to enter a Northern college, or a planter to resort to a Northern watering-place.

The common-sense of the planter was outraged when told that he was a sinner above all others.

Throughout the West Indies the planter is usually not merely a sugar-grower, but a sugar-maker also.

'Owing to my connection with the owner of the estate, I naturally had some authority with the people; and I did my best to preserve order amongst them, particularly in the boiling-house, where there used to be a good deal of petty theft, especially at night; for we had not then the powerful machinery which enables the planter to commence his grinding late and finish it early.

Thus did cultivation, driven out, leave the East, and perhaps the Deserts formerly robbed of their coverings: like the wild hordes of old over beautiful Greece, thus rolls the conquest with fearful rapidity from east to west through America; and the planter now often leaves the already exhausted land, the eastern climate becomes infertile through the demolition of the forests, to introduce a similar revolution into the far West.'

land holder, land owner, landlord, land lady, slumlord; lord of the manor, lord paramount; heritor, laird, vavasour^, landed gentry, mesne lord^; planter.

There was an indigo-planter before the Committee to-day.

The culture of this plant is besides extremely easy, as it requires no other labor than clearing the grounds from brush-wood, and lightly turning up the earth with a plough, before the seeds are scattered, which being done, the planter leaves the crop to its own chance, and in five months gathers abundant fruit, if, at the time the bud opens, it is not burnt by the north winds, or rotted with unseasonable showers.

The quintal of indigo of the first class costs the planter from $35 to $40 at most; and in the market of Manila it has been sold from $60 to $130, according to the quality and the greater or lesser demand for the article at the season.

It is a question I merely glance at, as it does not come within the scope of a book like this; but it is well known to every planter and European who has come much in contact with the rural classes of Hindostan, that there is a vast amount of smouldering disaffection, of deep-rooted dislike to, and contempt of, our present cumbrous costly machinery of law and justice.

The educated gentleman planter of the present day is above suspicion, and before showering titles and honours on native gentlemen, elevating them to the bench, and deluging the services with them, it might be worth our rulers' while to utilise, or try to utilise, the experience, loyalty, honour, and integrity of those of our countrymen who might be willing to place their services at the disposal of Government.

It was a lesson to the police in those parts, and they did not dare to trouble me much afterwards; but it is only one instance out of hundreds I could give, and which every planter has witnessed of the barefaced audacity, the shameless extortion, the unblushing lawlessness of the rural police of India.

All the wrestlers in the country-side know each other's qualifications pretty accurately, and at a general match got up by a Zemindar or planter, or by public subscription, it is generally safe to let them handicap the men who are ready to compete for the prizes.

You have a vast responsibility on your shoulders, and when one takes into consideration the climate you have to contend with, the home comforts and domestic joys you have to do without, the constant tension of mind and irritation of body from dust, heat, insects, lies, bribery, robbers, and villany of every description, that meets you on all hands, it must be allowed that a planter at such a time has no easy life.

The villagers know all about them, discuss their affairs with the utmost freedom, and not a single thing, ever so trivial, happens in the planter's home but it is known and commented on in all the villages that lie within the ilaka (jurisdiction) of the factory.

But many of my readers will associate with the name of Purneah or Bhaugulpore planter, recollections of hospitality and unostentatious kindness, and memories of glorious sport and warm-hearted friendships.

They make friends with your bearer, and an old hat and coat transforms them into a planter, a missionary, or an officer.

The Pooneah seldom lasts more than the two days, but it is quite unique in its feudal character, and is one of the old-fashioned observances; a relic of the time when the planter was really looked upon as the father of his people, and when a little sentiment and mutual affection mingled with the purely business relations of landlord and tenant.

Character of the planter.

The energy and intelligence of the planter has breathed on the stagnant waters of the Hindoo intellect the breath of life, and the living tide is heaving, full of activity, purging by its resistless ever-moving pulsations the formerly stagnant mass of its impurities, and making it a life-giving sea of active industry and progress.

Such was the picture drawn of the indigo planter not so many years ago.

Half, nay nine-tenths, of the stories against planters, are got up by the money-lenders, the petty Zemindars, and wealthy villagers, who find the planter competing with them for land and labour, and raising the price of both.

But not long since, an official was afraid to dine at a planter's house, fearing he might be accused of planter proclivities.

But not long since, an official was afraid to dine at a planter's house, fearing he might be accused of planter proclivities.

Old G., a planter in Purneah, once came across a pair engaged in deadly combat.

The rest was indistinct, but the building was large and had evidently belonged to a sugar or coffee planter.

[Footnote 10: Smedes, A Southern Planter, pp.

Charles was very fond of talking to Peter, because Peter told about the slaves that worked on his father's plantations, for his father was a sugar planter, and had a large estate in Jamaica, so he was obliged to keep a great many negro slaves, for all the plantations in the West-Indies, are cultivated by negroes.

Already the indications are sufficient to tell us, that, under the sure, but silent working of those laws, the very profits of the Southern planter foreshadow the destruction of his monopoly.

Sometime in the year 1850, a tobacco-planter in Southern Georgia (Perry H. Oliver by name) bought a likely negro woman with some other field-hands.

The planter began to wonder what kind of a creature this was which he had bought, flesh and soul.

It was delightful to witness the change which had been wrought in this planter by the abolition of slavery.

Shortly after we reached his elevated and picturesque seat, we were joined by Mr. Cranstoun, a planter, who had been invited to dine with us.

" William Craze, jailor, Alexandria, La. in the "Planter's Intelligencer."

"Several years ago I was going below New Orleans, in what is called the Plaquemine country, and a planter sent down in my boat a runaway he had found in New Orleans, to his plantation at Orange 5 Points.

The planter who was the actor in it I myself knew; and the whole transaction is so characteristic of the man, that, independent of the strong authority I have, I should entertain but little doubt of its authenticity.

He is a wealthy planter, residing near Natchez, eccentric, capricious and intemperate.

"I was acquainted with a very wealthy planter, on the Pedee river, in South Carolina, who has since died in consequence of intemperance.

During the evening Mr. C. stated, that he had lately met with a planter who, for some years previous to emancipation, and indeed up to the very event, maintained that it was utterly impossible for such a thing ever to take place.

Now, said Mr. C., this planter would be one of the last in the island to vote for a restoration of slavery; nay, he even wishes to have the apprenticeship terminated at once, and entire freedom given to the people.

He said, that he once attended at the death of a planter who had been noted for his severity to his slaves.

we were soon joined by several gentlemen whom Mr. H. had invited to take breakfast with us; these were the Rev. Mr. Gittens, rector of St. Philip's parish, (in which Colliton estate is situated,) and member of the colonial council; Mr. Thomas, an extensive attorney of Barbadoes; and Dr. Bell, a planter of Demerarathen on a visit to the island.

Mr. Hinkston has been a planter for thirty-six years, and is highly esteemed throughout the island.

Together with his long experience and standing as a planter, Mr. H. has been for many years local magistrate for the parish in which he resides.

Mr. H. was ready to say, both as a planter and a magistrate, that vice and crime generally had decreased, and were still on the decrease.

VISIT TO COLONEL ASHBY'S. We were kindly invited to spend a day at the mansion of Colonel Ashby, an aged and experienced planter, who is the proprietor of the estate on which he resides.

Colonel A. is a native of Barbadoes, has been a practical planter since 1795, and for a long time a colonial magistrate, and commander of the parish troops.

Mr. Thomas, a neighboring planter, dined with us.

A few days subsequent to our visit to Colonel A.'s, the Reverend Mr. Packer, of the Established Church, called at our lodgings, and introduced a planter from the parish of St. Thomas.

The planter is proprietor of an estate, and has eighty apprentices.

Before this gentleman left, the Rev. Mr. C. called in with Mr. Pigeot, another planter, with whom we had a long conversation.

We had heard of him previously as the only planter in the island who had made an experiment in task work prior to abolition.

Although this planter looked forward with sanguine hopes to 1840, yet he would freely say that he did not think the apprenticeship would be any preparation for entire freedom.

We were introduced to a planter who was notorious during the reign of slavery for the strictness of his discipline, to use the Barbadian phrase, or, in plain English, for his rigorous treatment and his cruelty.

But with all his violent prejudices, this planter stated some facts which are highly favorable to the apprentices.

The consequence of this imprudent measure, said our informant, is that the planters have no control over the children born on their estates; and in many instances their parents have sent them away lest their residence on the property should, by some chance, give the planter a claim upon their services.

They would plant the whole in cane if they were not discouraged by the planter, whose principal objection to their doing so is that it would lead to the entire neglect of provision cultivation.

A wealthy planter, a member of the legislative council, sitting at the breakfast table with a colored man, whose mother was a negress of the most unmitigated hue, and who himself showed a head of hair as curly as his mother's!

We had been invited by Stephen Bourne, Esq., special magistrate for one of the rural districts in those parishes, to spend a week in his family, and accompany him in his official visits to the plantations embraced in his commissionan invitation we were very glad to accept, as it laid open to us at the same time three important sources of information,the magistrate, the planter, and the apprentice.

When you find a kind planter, in whom the apprentices have confidence, there you will find beautiful gardens.

* * * * Place the negroes on the same footing with other men, and give them the uncontrolled power over their time and labor, and it will become the interest of the planter, as well as the rest of the community, to treat the negro well, for their comfort and happiness depend on his industry and good behavior.

Daniell, Dr. Death-bed of a planter.

Murder of a planter.

Planter, a severe one.

When such a man as Sir Lionel Smith pronounced it no longer practicable to carry on coercive labor, he must have been a bold as well as a rash planter who would venture to hold on to the old system under Lord Glenelg's improvement Act.

Why do we not tell the English nation frankly and candidly, that they agreed to give the planter six years' services of their apprentices, as a part of the compensation, and if they desired to do away with it, that we must be paid for it, otherwise we will NOT ANSWER FOR ANY CHANGE, FOR ANY EVILS WHICH ARE LIKELY TO ENSUE.

Prior to August 1st, the planter studiously avoided every thing like an arrangement with the laborer, and when, on the following Monday, they turned out to work, the paltry pittance of 12-1/2d.

The apprentice received the same when he worked for the estate on his own days, Friday and Saturday; and whenever they were valued for the purpose of purchasing the remaining time of their apprenticeship, the planter upon oath stated that their services were worth at least 1s.

He (Sir Lionel) doubted not the right of the planters to rent their houses and grounds; in order to be more certain on that head, he had procured the opinion of the Attorney General; but the exercise of the right by the planter, and getting the people to work, were very different matters.

He had purchased his propertyit was his allhe had sacrificed twenty of the best years of his life as a planter, he had a wife and family to support, and what was the prospect before him and them?

"A Mr. Jackson, a planter from St. Vincents, has been in this city within a few day, and says that the emancipation of the slaves on that island works extremely well; and that his plantation produces more and yields a larger profit than it has ever done before.

With each year's crop would go a long list of articles of every sort,hardware, glass, crockery, clothing, furniture, household utensils, wines,which the agent was instructed to buy with the proceeds of the tobacco and send back to the planter when the ships came a year later for another crop.

3; and "A Professional Planter," Practical Rules for the Management and Medical Treatment of Negro Slaves in the Sugar Colonies (London, 1803), pp.

In buying new negroes a practical planter having a preference for those of some particular tribal stock might make sure of getting them only by taking with him to the slave ships or the "Guinea yards" in the island ports a slave of the stock wanted and having him interrogate those for sale in his native language to learn whether they were in fact what the dealers declared them to be.

5; A Professional Planter, Rules, chap.

2; Thomas Roughley, Jamaica Planter's Guide (London, 1823), pp. 118-120.]

At least one public-spirited planter advocated in 1801 the heroic measure of closing the slave trade in order to raise the price of labor and coerce the planters into saving it both by improving their apparatus and by diminishing the death rate.

[Footnote 21: The "fatal habit of eating dirt" is described by Thomas Roughley in his Planter's Guide (London.

Nay, many live on a slender diet to buy rum, sugar and molasses, with other such like necessaries, which are sold at such a rate that the planter here is but a slave to raise a provision for other colonies, and dare not allow himself to partake of his own creatures, except it be the corn of the country in hominy bread."

T., at Missionary Ridge, 137; captures Atlanta, 151; and the Georgia planter, 164; passes by Charleston, 169; at Goldsborough, 183 ff.

Directly from his own pier, each planter shipped his tobacco to England; and in return there was unloaded upon his own pier the commodities needed for his plantation community.

She came, a passing stranger, upon her husband's trading ship; a ship that would anchor but to exchange its English wares for the planter's tobacco, and then turn prow again to the perils of the sea.

There would be exchange of news as well as of commodities, and a friendly rivalry in the matter of tales of adventurethe planter's story of Indian attacks being pitted against the captain's yarn of the "pyrats" that gave him chase off the "Isle of Devils."

A planter in Virginia, being pressed for money, sold one of his bondwomen, of sixteen years old, to a speculator who was buying up slaves for the markets of the South and South-west.

According to his own account, he was the son of a wealthy planter in Virginia, who sold his mother with himself and his twin sister when they were eleven months old.

The rich planter did not deny poor Rachel's assertion, but in answer to her son's inquiries, he plainly manifested that he neither knew nor cared who had bought her, or to what part of the country she had been sent.

Being recommended to an honest planter, I lived with him till such time as I was informed of the manner of their planting and making sugar; and seeing how well they lived, and how suddenly they grew rich, I was filled with a desire to settle among them, and resolved to get my money remitted to me, and to purchase a plantation.

The men were in great spirits, however (there were eight of them rowing, and one behind was steering); one of them said something which elicited an exclamation of general assent, and I asked what it was; the steerer said they were pleased because there was not another planter's lady in all Georgia who would have gone through the storm all alone with them in a boat; i.e. without the protecting presence of a white man.

It is now in a most ruinous and tottering condition, and they inhabit but a few rooms in it; the others are gradually mouldering to pieces, and the whole edifice will, I should think, hardly stand long enough to be carried away by the river, which in its yearly inroads on the bank on which it stands has already approached within a perilous proximity to the old dilapidated planter's palace.

His father was a well-to-do planter.