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362 examples of  rambler  in sentences

362 examples of rambler in sentences

The author of the Rambler used to make inarticulate animal noises over a favourite food.

'But (said he, smiling) he met me once, and said, "I am told you have written a very pretty book called The Rambler."

JOHNSON.' 'London, March 28, 1782.' Notwithstanding his afflicted state of body[470] and mind this year, the following correspondence affords a proof not only of his benevolence and conscientious readiness to relieve a good man from errour, but by his cloathing one of the sentiments in his Rambler in different language, not inferiour to that of the original, shews his extraordinary command of clear and forcible expression.

A bowl of roses, plucked by Ophelia from the crimson rambler by the south window, rested in the center of the table.

No man can hide anything long from a woman" Reaching over she jerked a spray of tiny roses from the rambler at the window near which they were standing; tapping the blossoms against her lips, beginning to smile whimsically, she continued: "Why, I can almost read your own thoughts right now!

He listened with seeming understanding; but the next day, coming upon me as I was fastening a "crimson rambler" to its trellis, he inquired solemnly, "Can the roses make children have good manners, yet?" Country children are taught, even as sedulously as city children, the importance of good manners!

When he was going away, Dr. Johnson said, 'I shall ever retain a great regard for you;' then asked him if he had The Rambler.

In the first number of The Rambler, Johnson shews how attractive to an author is the form of publication which he was himself then adopting:'It heightens his alacrity to think in how many places he shall have what he is now writing read with ecstacies to-morrow.'

In The Rambler, No. 82, Johnson makes a virtuoso write:'I often lamented that I was not one of that happy generation who demolished the convents and monasteries, and broke windows by law.'

The Rambler, No. 47.

In the Rambler, No. 98, entitled The Necessity of Cultivating Politeness, Johnson says:'The universal axiom in which all complaisance is included, and from which flow all the formalities which custom has established in civilized nations, is, That no man shall give any preference to himself.'

Though Johnson says that 'a book of science is inexhaustible,' yet in The Rambler, No. 154, he asserts that 'the principles of arithmetick and geometry may be comprehended by a close attention in a few days.'

I said, and father thought it was a good idea and took a little crimson rambler rose bush from the box.

The second picture is of me tying up the crimson rambler.

He added a postscript to his letter, saying: "I've sent you little Miss Nancy's letter, the photograph of her tying up the rambler rose, and the family group; so that you can see exactly what influenced me to write her (and Bill Harmon) that they should be undisturbed in their tenancy, and that their repairs and improvements should be taken in lieu of rent."

The incident of your father's asking what you could do to thank the Yellow House for the happy hour it had given you on that summer day long ago, and the planting of the crimson rambler by the side of the portico.

The planting of that crimson rambler will fix Tom, for he's a romantic boy.

Blest he the man that taught the poor to pray, That shed on adverse fate religion's day, That wash'd the clotted tear from sorrow's face, Recall'd the rambler to the heavenly race, Dispell'd the murky clouds of discontent, And read the lore of patience wheresoe'er he went.

City Rambler, or The Playhouse Wedding; a Comedy; acted at the Theatre-Royal.

It does not appear that Mr. Walmsley's recommendation of him to Colson, whom he has described under the character of Gelidus, in the twenty-fourth paper of the Rambler, was of much use.

After very heavy rains the waterfall attains quite a respectable size, but even under such favourable conditions the popularity of the place to a great extent spoils what might otherwise be a pleasant surprise to the rambler.

Boswell, ii. 218, and Prefatory Notice to Rambler, vol.

At the time of instituting the club in Ivy lane, Johnson had projected the Rambler.

" Having invoked the special protection of heaven, and by that act of piety fortified his mind, he began the great work of the Rambler.

In the beginning of 1750, soon after the Rambler was set on foot, Johnson was induced, by the arts of a vile impostor, to lend his assistance, during a temporary delusion, to a fraud not to be paralleled in the annals of literature[o].

The last number of the Rambler, as already mentioned, was on the 14th of that month.

During the two years in which the Rambler was carried on, the Dictionary proceeded by slow degrees.

In May, 1752, having composed a prayer, preparatory to his return from tears and sorrow to the duties of life, he resumed his grand design, and went on with vigour, giving, however, occasional assistance to his friend, Dr. Hawkesworth, in the Adventurer, which began soon after the Rambler was laid aside.

He had said, in the last number of the Rambler, "that, having laboured to maintain the dignity of virtue, I will not now degrade it by the meanness of dedication."

Time, however, discovered that he translated from the French, a Rambler, which had been taken from the English, without acknowledgment.

The writer of this narrative has now before him a letter, in Dr. Johnson's handwriting, which shows the distress and melancholy situation of the man, who had written the Rambler, and finished the great work of his Dictionary.

The character of Prospero, in the Rambler, No. 200, was, beyond all question, occasioned by Garrick's ostentatious display of furniture and Dresden china.

The tragedy of Irene is founded on a passage in Knolles's History of the Turks; an author highly commended in the Rambler, No. 122.

The Rambler may be considered, as Johnson's great work.

So it was with the Rambler, every Tuesday and Saturday, for two years.

" It is remarkable, that the pomp of diction, which has been objected to Johnson, was first assumed in the Rambler.

The letter, in the Rambler, No. 12, from a young girl that wants a place, will illustrate this observation.

His moral essays are beautiful; but in that province nothing can exceed the Rambler, though Johnson used to say, that the essay on "the burthens of mankind," (in the Spectator, No. 558,) was the most exquisite he had ever read.

The essays written by Johnson in the Adventurer, may be called a continuation of the Rambler.

The reader, if he pleases, may compare it with another fine paper in the Rambler, No. 54, on the conviction that rushes on the mind at the bed of a dying friend.

[aa] On the subject of voluntary penance, see the Rambler, No. 110.

His head knocked off the dead petals of a rambler rose blossom, scattering them at his feet.

An exception, however, must be made in the case of two sons of Rambler, by name Dundee and Alister, names very familiar in the Scottish Terrier pedigrees of the present day.

[Footnote 1: Steele's papers had many imitations, as the Historian, here named; the Rhapsody, Observator, Moderator, Growler, Censor, Hermit, Surprize, Silent Monitor, Inquisitor, Pilgrim, Restorer, Instructor, Grumbler, &c. There was also in 1712 a Rambler, anticipating the name of Dr. Johnsons Rambler of 1750-2.]

[Footnote 1: Steele's papers had many imitations, as the Historian, here named; the Rhapsody, Observator, Moderator, Growler, Censor, Hermit, Surprize, Silent Monitor, Inquisitor, Pilgrim, Restorer, Instructor, Grumbler, &c. There was also in 1712 a Rambler, anticipating the name of Dr. Johnsons Rambler of 1750-2.]

In the afternoon I read and write and mend, and then I take a light supper in the arbor on the east side of the house under a crimson rambler, one of the first ever planted here over thirty years ago.

I must tell you about that crimson rambler.

So I threw up an arbor between them, and the crimson rambler now mounts eight feet in the air.

The Rambler.

" It is proper to observe that this passage bears a very close resemblance to a passage in the Rambler (No. 20).

Burney's admiration of the powers which had produced Rasselas and The Rambler, bordered on idolatry.

In his early years he wrote two satires in verse in imitation of Juvenal; they were followed later by two series of periodical essays on the model of the Spectator; neither of themthe Rambler nor the Idlerwere at all successful.

Judged by the standards of journalistic success, the Rambler could not well be worse than he made it.

Viewed in the light of his life, the Rambler is one of the most moving of books.

TO THE RAMBLER.

TO THE RAMBLER.

TO THE RAMBLER.

I hope, Mr. Rambler, you will inform them, that no man should be denied the privilege of silence, or tortured to false declarations; and that though ladies may justly claim to be exempt from rudeness, they have no right to force unwilling civilities.

He told Boswell that before he wrote the Rambler he had been running about the world more than almost any body.

ELPHINSTON TO THE RAMBLER.

TO THE RAMBLER.

TO THE RAMBLER.

I beg to be informed, Mr. Rambler, how much we can be supposed to owe to beneficence, exerted on terms like these?

TO THE RAMBLER.

Such, Mr. Rambler, is the power of wealth, that it commands the ear of greatness and the eye of beauty, gives spirit to the dull, and authority to the timorous, and leaves him from whom it departs, without virtue and without understanding, the sport of caprice, the scoff of insolence, the slave of meanness, and the pupil of ignorance.

TO THE RAMBLER.

But is this misery, Mr. Rambler, never to cease; have I spent my life in study only to become the sport of the ignorant, and debarred myself from all the common enjoyments of youth to collect ideas which must sleep in silence, and form opinions which I must not divulge?

MR. RAMBLER.

AJUT AND ANNINGAIT, in The Rambler.

"Rambler, No. 1.

"Murray's Exercises, 8vo, p. 146: see Rambler, No. 185.

" "You should have pink morning glories and there's a rambler rose, a pink one, that you ought to have in the southeast corner on your back fence," suggested Mr. Emerson.

" "Pink rambler," they all wrote.

He published anonymously his translation of Lobos Voyage to Abyssinia; London; The Life of Savage; The Rambler, and The Idler, both in separate numbers and when collected in volumes; Rasselas; The False Alarm; Falkland's Islands; The Patriot;, and Taxation no Tyranny; (when these four pamphlets were collected in a volume he published them with the title of Political Tracts, by the Authour of the Rambler).

He published anonymously his translation of Lobos Voyage to Abyssinia; London; The Life of Savage; The Rambler, and The Idler, both in separate numbers and when collected in volumes; Rasselas; The False Alarm; Falkland's Islands; The Patriot;, and Taxation no Tyranny; (when these four pamphlets were collected in a volume he published them with the title of Political Tracts, by the Authour of the Rambler).

The reported Russian version of the 'Rambler'.

I am informed by my friend, Mr. W. R. Morfill, M.A., of Oriel College, Oxford, who has, I suppose, no rival in this country in his knowledge of the Slavonic tongues, that no Russian translation of the Rambler has been published.

Rambler, reported Russian version, lxiii.

n. 1 Addison, Hume, Swift, Young on them, ii. 61, n. 4 Bentley, ii. 61, n. 4; v. 274, n. 4; Boerhaave, ii. 61, n. 4 Fielding, v. 275, n. 1 Rambler, Vicar of Wakefield, Hume, and Boileau, iii. 375, n. 1 Johnson's solitary reply to one, i. 314; ii. 61, ib. n. 4. ATTERBURY, Bishop, elegance of his English, ii. 95, n. 2 Funeral Sermon on Lady Cutts, ii. 228 Sermons, iii.

MIRTH, the measure of a man's understanding, ii. 378, n. 2. Miscellaneous and Fugitive Pieces by the Authour of the Rambler, ii. 270.

MONASTERIES, austerities treated of in Rambler and Idler, ii. 435; bodily labour wanted, ii. 390; Carthusian, unreasonableness of becoming a, ii. 435; their silence absurd, ib.; Johnson curious to see them, i. 365; saying to a Lady Abbess, ii.

NORFOLK, militia, i. 307, n. 4; sale of the Rambler in the county, i. 208, n. 3; mentioned, iv.

172; defined, i. 264, n. 4; harmful to learning, v. 59; mentioned in the Rambler, i. 259, n. 4; Letter to Chesterfield, i. 262; Vanity of Human Wishes, i. 264.

Political Tracts by the Author of the Rambler, ii. 315; copy in Pembroke College, ib., n. 2; attacked, ii. 315-317; preface to it suggested, ii. 441.

ii. of his, i. 255; Easter Day, 1777, iii. 99; engaging in Politicks with H, i. 489; forgiveness for neglect of duties in married life, i. 240; January 1, 1753, i. 251; new scheme of life, i. 350; 'On my return to life,' i. 234, n. 2; Rambler, before the, i. 202; repentance and pardon, for, iv.

Rambler, Beauties of the, i. 214.

368; portraits: See under JOHNSON; prejudice against foreigners, iv. 15, n. 3; prejudices and obstinacy, i. 293, n. 1; pride, iii. 345, n. 1; quarrel with Dr. Warton, ii. 41, n. 1; Rambler, origin of the name, i. 202; readiness for a reconciliation, ii. 100, n, 1, 256, n. 1; 'rough as winter, mild as summer,' iv.

434; Rambler, i. 210, n. 1; Reynolds's last lecture, iii. 369, n. 2; Shelburne and Carlisle, Earls of, iv. 246, n. 5; Wilkes as City Chamberlain, iv. 101, n. 2; Williams, Miss H.M., iv.

121; quotations, iv. 102, n. 1; 'quotidian prey,' v. 346; Rambler, his copy of the, i. 215; 'Small sands the mountain,' &c., iii. 164; sundial, iv. 60; Universal Passion, money received for it lost in the South Sea, iv.

To the third volume of this work the following advertisement is prefixed: "In this volume, the Discourse on the Greek Comedy, and the General Conclusion, are translated by the celebrated author of the Rambler.

Crimson rambler.

(The Rambler audio-visual teaching series.

Three windows faced the north, their curtains partially drawn, and I could perceive through them the lattice work of a porch, covered with the green and red of a rambler rose.

[Footnote 1: Steele's papers had many imitations, as the Historian, here named; the Rhapsody, Observator, Moderator, Growler, Censor, Hermit, Surprize, Silent Monitor, Inquisitor, Pilgrim, Restorer, Instructor, Grumbler, &c. There was also in 1712 a Rambler, anticipating the name of Dr. Johnsons Rambler of 1750-2.]

[Footnote 1: Steele's papers had many imitations, as the Historian, here named; the Rhapsody, Observator, Moderator, Growler, Censor, Hermit, Surprize, Silent Monitor, Inquisitor, Pilgrim, Restorer, Instructor, Grumbler, &c. There was also in 1712 a Rambler, anticipating the name of Dr. Johnsons Rambler of 1750-2.]

See Dr. Drake's Essays on the Rambler, &c. vol.

The subject of the following letter is not wholly unmentioned by the Rambler.

See Rambler 110 and Note.

Unutterably grimy but inexpressibly cheerful, he reported progress to Major Wagstaffe when that nocturnal rambler visited him in the small hours.

Wieland was the great poet then, with whom perhaps might be classed the ode-maker, Rambler of Berlin.