Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
462822 examples of  she  in sentences

462822 examples of she in sentences

As Edna disbursed the funds, she knew that this proportion was three quarters for herself and Ralph, and one quarter for Mrs. Cliff.

On Mr. Cliff's death his widow had found herself with an income smaller than she had expected, and that it was necessary to change in a degree her style of living.

Of course, the captain had not actually given her this thing, and that thing, and the other, or the next one, but he had allowed her a sum of money, and she had expended it according to her own discretion.

She did not see any strong reason to believe that the captain would ever send any more, and as she had a home, and Ralph and Edna had not, she would not take all the money that was due her, feeling that they might come to need it more than she would.

But even with this generous self-denial she found herself in Plainton with a balance of some thousands of dollars in her possession, and as much more in Edna's hands, which the latter had insisted that she would hold subject to order.

There was poor old Mrs. Bradley, who must shortly leave the home in which she had lived nearly all her life, because she could no longer afford to pay the rent.

There was poor old Mrs. Bradley, who must shortly leave the home in which she had lived nearly all her life, because she could no longer afford to pay the rent.

Mrs. Perley, the minister's wife, opened the interview by stating that, while she was sorry to see Mrs. Cliff looking so pale and worried, she was very glad, at the same time, to be able to say something which might, in some degree, relieve her anxiety and comfort her mind, by showing her that she was surrounded by friends who could give her their heartfelt sympathy in her troubles, and perhaps do a little more.

Mrs. Perley, the minister's wife, opened the interview by stating that, while she was sorry to see Mrs. Cliff looking so pale and worried, she was very glad, at the same time, to be able to say something which might, in some degree, relieve her anxiety and comfort her mind, by showing her that she was surrounded by friends who could give her their heartfelt sympathy in her troubles, and perhaps do a little more.

She said, in fact, that the blankets you had were the same you bought when you were first married, that some of them had been worn out and given to your poorer neighbors, and that now you were very short of blankets, and, with cold weather coming on, she did not consider that the clothing on your own bed was sufficient.

With a stern severity, not unknown to her friends and neighbors in former days, she rose to her feet.

"Nancy Shott," said she, "I don't know anything that makes me feel more at home than to hear you talk like that.

And then she had more thinking to do, based upon this contingency, which brought on a headache, and she remained in bed all the next day.

The next morning, Willy Croup, who had begun to regret that she had ever said anything about blankets,but how could she have imagined that anybody could be so cut up at what that old Shott woman had said?brought Mrs. Cliff a letter.

The next morning, Willy Croup, who had begun to regret that she had ever said anything about blankets,but how could she have imagined that anybody could be so cut up at what that old Shott woman had said?brought Mrs. Cliff a letter.

"Sick!" exclaimed poor Mrs. Cliff, as she sank upon a sofa.

"All you have to do," she said, "is to be patient and wait awhile, and then, when you go back like a queen to Plainton, you will have had your mountains and your palaces besides.

She did not expect ever to live in San Francisco again, and in no other place need she be known as Mrs. Horn.

She did not expect ever to live in San Francisco again, and in no other place need she be known as Mrs. Horn.

"It would be a little rough," she said, "if your friends were to meet you as Mrs. Horn, and you would be obliged to answer questions.

Mrs. Cliff was not a cultivated woman, but she had a good, common-sense appreciation of art in its various forms.

She would tramp with untiring step through the galleries of the Louvre, but when she had seen a gallery, she did not care to visit it again.

She would tramp with untiring step through the galleries of the Louvre, but when she had seen a gallery, she did not care to visit it again.

She would tramp with untiring step through the galleries of the Louvre, but when she had seen a gallery, she did not care to visit it again.

She went to the theatre and the opera because she wanted to see how they acted and sang in France, but she did not wish to go often to a place where she could not understand a word that was spoken.

She went to the theatre and the opera because she wanted to see how they acted and sang in France, but she did not wish to go often to a place where she could not understand a word that was spoken.

America and beginning his long voyage across the Atlantic, he would touch at some port from which he might send her a letter, which, coming by steamer, would reach her before she could expect the arrival of the brig.

She had arranged with a commercial agency to telegraph to her the moment the Miranda should arrive in any French port, but no message had come, and no matter what else she was doing, it seemed to Edna as if she were always expecting such a message.

So she listened to Mrs. Cliff and her own desires, and the party journeyed to Italy, by the way of Geneva and Bern.

It was hard for her to fulfil this injunction, for her mind was as practical as that of Mrs. Cliff, and she could not help considering the future, and the probability of never receiving an addition to the funds she now had on deposit in London and Paris.

It was not necessary to spend all she had, but, whether he came back poor or rich, he should see that she had believed in him and in his success.

It was not necessary to spend all she had, but, whether he came back poor or rich, he should see that she had believed in him and in his success.

From the letters that Willy Croup wrote her, she knew that people were coming to the front in Plainton who ought to be on the back seats, and that she, who could occupy, if she chose, the best place, was thought of only as a poor widow who was companion to a lady who was travelling.

From the letters that Willy Croup wrote her, she knew that people were coming to the front in Plainton who ought to be on the back seats, and that she, who could occupy, if she chose, the best place, was thought of only as a poor widow who was companion to a lady who was travelling.

With the whole world covered with post routes and telegraph-wires, it would be simply impossible for Captain Horn and those two sailors to keep absolutely silent and unheard of for such a long timeunless," she continued, hesitating even in her thoughts, "they don't want to be heard from."

She was looked upon as an original, being a woman of an independent character, who bluntly told the truth to every one, and who, although her means were very small, behaved in society just as she would have done had she been rolling in wealth.

She was looked upon as an original, being a woman of an independent character, who bluntly told the truth to every one, and who, although her means were very small, behaved in society just as she would have done had she been rolling in wealth.

She was looked upon as an original, being a woman of an independent character, who bluntly told the truth to every one, and who, although her means were very small, behaved in society just as she would have done had she been rolling in wealth.

She never could abide the late Kalitine, and as soon as her niece married him she retired to her own modest little property, where she spent ten whole years in a peasant's smoky hut.

She never could abide the late Kalitine, and as soon as her niece married him she retired to her own modest little property, where she spent ten whole years in a peasant's smoky hut.

She never could abide the late Kalitine, and as soon as her niece married him she retired to her own modest little property, where she spent ten whole years in a peasant's smoky hut.

" "Yes," replied Maria Dmitrievna, "she is in the garden.

" Maria Dmitrievna did not stand upon ceremony when she was only thinking to herself.

When she spoke aloud she was more choice in her expressions.

When she spoke aloud she was more choice in her expressions.

She transferred all her property to his name, and soon afterwards, rouged, perfumed with amber รก la Richelieu, surrounded by negro boys, Italian grey-hounds, and noisy parrots, she died, stretched on a crooked silken couch of the style of Louis the Fifteenth, with an enamelled snuff-box of Petitot's work in her handsand died deserted by her husband.

She transferred all her property to his name, and soon afterwards, rouged, perfumed with amber รก la Richelieu, surrounded by negro boys, Italian grey-hounds, and noisy parrots, she died, stretched on a crooked silken couch of the style of Louis the Fifteenth, with an enamelled snuff-box of Petitot's work in her handsand died deserted by her husband.

A few days before her death, when she could no longer rise from her bed, she told her husband in the presence of the priest, while her dying eyes swam with timid tears, that she wished to see her daughter-in-law, and to bid her farewell, and to bless her grandson.

A few days before her death, when she could no longer rise from her bed, she told her husband in the presence of the priest, while her dying eyes swam with timid tears, that she wished to see her daughter-in-law, and to bid her farewell, and to bless her grandson.

A few days before her death, when she could no longer rise from her bed, she told her husband in the presence of the priest, while her dying eyes swam with timid tears, that she wished to see her daughter-in-law, and to bid her farewell, and to bless her grandson.

But after a time she attained endurance, and grew accustomed to her father-in-law.

She would have preferred to die rather than to delegate her authority to another housewifeand such a housewife too!

She was leaning forward, a red glow coloring her cheeks.

"Good," she said, and her brow grew dark.

She procured a very pretty set of apartments in one of the quiet but fashionable streets, she made her husband such a dressing-gown as he had never worn before; she secured an elegant lady's maid, an excellent cook, and an energetic footman; and she provided herself with an exquisite carriage, and a charming cabinet piano.

She worshipped Marfa Timofeevna, who loved her dearly, although she teased her greatly about her susceptible heart.

She worshipped Marfa Timofeevna, who loved her dearly, although she teased her greatly about her susceptible heart.

And she's pretty, too, with her pale, fresh face, her eyes and lips so serious, and that frank and guileless way she has of looking at you.

It's a pity she seems a little enthusiastic.

She will follow the same road that all others have to follow.

But hehe is, to describe him by one word, a dil-le-tante" "But doesn't she love him?" Lemm rose from his bench.

"No, she does not love him.

That is to say, she is very pure of heart, and does not herself know the meaning of the words, 'to love.'

And who has told you that she wants to return to me?

Why, she is completely satisfied with her position.

" "But I tell you," replied Lavretsky, with an involuntary burst of impatience, "you do not know the sort of creature she is.

"It's a bore to me, my dear," she said, "to move my old bones; and there's nowhere, I suppose, in your house where I could pass the night; besides, I never can sleep in a strange bed.

she exclaimed, withdrawing her line from the water, and then throwing it a long way in again.

Liza had hung up her hat on a bough when she went away.

She nodded assent, and he pulled up his horse.

Little Katy couldn't have defined, the difference between the two in words; she never attempted it but once, and then she said that Mrs. Ferret was like a crabapple, and her mother like a Bartlett pear.

Little Katy couldn't have defined, the difference between the two in words; she never attempted it but once, and then she said that Mrs. Ferret was like a crabapple, and her mother like a Bartlett pear.

She wouldn't get many silk-dresses, and she'd have to fix her old bonnets over two or three years hand-running.

And having succeeded in getting her ribbon adjusted as she wanted it, Mrs. Plausaby looked at herself in the glass with an approving conscience.

She sympathized with his intellectual activity, and she was full of wonder at his intense moral earnestness.

She sympathized with his intellectual activity, and she was full of wonder at his intense moral earnestness.

She did not wear the covert coat of the morning, but a red knit jacket, buttoned tight about her.

She was young with every emphasis of youth.

With a few skilful strokes she brought her little craft beside my pipe, picked it up and tossed it to the wharf.

The poised blade dropped into the water with a splash; she brought the canoe a trifle nearer to the wharf with an almost imperceptible stroke, and turned toward me with wonder and dismay in her eyes.

Twice I had seen the red tam-oโ€™-shanter far through the wood, and once I had passed my young acquaintance with another girl, a dark, laughing youngster, walking in the highway, and she had bowed to me coldly.

โ€œSheโ€™s been quite uncomfortable, sir; but they hope to see her out in a few days!โ€

she said with a great deal of dignity.

โ€œSheโ€™s a sight!โ€œโ€”and my guide laughed approvingly.

โ€œBut we have to take her; sheโ€™s part of the treatment.โ€

I did not like to lose her,โ€”the life, the youth, the mirth for which she stood.

"Ces messieurs," she said, "will find a vacant table yonder, by the window.

"If Monsieur has any complaint to make," she said, "he can make it to me.

She had not bargained to entertain a party of four; yet she dared not disoblige the Petit Courier Illustrรฉ.

She had not bargained to entertain a party of four; yet she dared not disoblige the Petit Courier Illustrรฉ.

She had no time, however, to demur to the arrangement; for Mรผller, ingeniously taking her acquiescence for granted, darted out of the room without waiting for an answer.

The woman we worship is always a phenomenon, whether of beauty, or grace, or virtuetill we find her out; and then, probably, she becomes a phenomenon of deceit, or slovenliness, or bad temper!

And so, hobbling back again, she brought out a small flat brown paper-packet sealed at both ends.

When I did at last encounter her upon the stairs one dusk autumnal evening, she wore a thick black veil, and, darting past me like a bird on the wing, disappeared down the staircase in fewer moments than I take to write it.

"Pray, M'sieur Basil," said she, "have you one?" "One what?"

The man being dismissed, she came back, carrying the parcel.

It was evidently heavy, and she put it down on the nearest chair.

Here she paused and thanked me.

"Accept my best thanks, sir," she said in English, with a pretty foreign accent, that seemed to give new music to the dear familiar tongue.

I had just bought the book you wished to purchase," She looks at me with evident surprise and some coldness; but says nothing.