Inspirassion

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139 examples of  sinnes  in sentences

139 examples of sinnes in sentences

well it shewn he thoughten coste no sinne; The trammels of the palfrye pleasde his sighte, For the horse-millanare his head with roses dighte. 'An almes, sir prieste!'

I, there's the poynt: My sinnes like Pullies still drew me downewards: 'Twas I that taught thee first to Idolize, And unlesse that I can with-draw thy mind From following that I did with tears intreat, I'me lost, for ever lost, lost in my selfe and thee.

we have no warres but in our selves; We fighting with our sinnes, our sinnes with us; Yet they still get the Victory.

we have no warres but in our selves; We fighting with our sinnes, our sinnes with us; Yet they still get the Victory.

Thy life hath hitherto beene, my dear husband, But a disease to thee; thou hast indeed Mov'd on the earth like other creeping wormes Who take delight in worldly surfeits, heate Their blood with lusts, their limbes with proud attyres; Fe[e]d on their change of sinnes; that doe not use Their pleasure[s] but enjoy them, enjoy them fully In streames that are most sensuall and persever To live so till they die, and to die never.

You should be the Court-Diall and direct The king with constant motion; be ever beating (Like to Clocke-Hammers) on his Iron heart To make it sound cleere and to feel remorse: You should unlocke his soule, wake his dead conscience Which, like a drowsie Centinell, gives leave For sinnes vast army to beleaguer him: His ruines will be ask'd for at your hands.

You should be the Court-Diall and direct The King with constant motion; be ever beating (Like to Clocke-Hammers) on his Iron heart, To make it sound cleere and to feele remorse: You should unlocke his soule, wake his dead conscience Which, like a drowsie Centinell, gives leave For sinnes vast army to beleaguer him.

I woo'd not have thy sinne scoar'd on my head For all the Indian Treasury.

I woo'd not have this sinne scor'd on my head For all the Indaean Treasury.

Sinne is a Raven croaking her owne fall.

'Tis strange To see how brave this Tyrant shewes in Court, Throan'd like a god: great men are petty starres Where his rayes shine; wonder fills up all eyes By sight of him: let him but once checke sinne, About him round all cry "oh excellent king!

There's lesse chalke upon you[r] score of sinnes by these round o'es.

But destinie this huge chaos turmoyling, In which all good and evill was enclosed, Their heavenly vertues from these woes assoyling, Caried to heaven, from sinfull bondage losed: But their great sinnes, the causers of their paine, Under these antique ruines yet remaine.

Or some old sinne, whose unappeased guilt Powr'd vengeance forth on you eternallie?

So let us, which this chaunge of weather vew, Chaunge eke our mynds, and former lives amend; The old yeares sinnes forepast let us eschew, And fly the faults with which we did offend.

That goodly Beautie, albe heavenly borne, Is foule abusd, and that celestiall hew, 150 Which doth the world with her delight adorne, Made but the bait of sinne, and sinners scorne, Whilest every one doth seeke and sew to have it,

So that next off-spring of the Makers love, Next to himselfe in glorious degree, Degendering* to hate, fell from above Through pride; (for pride and love may ill agree;) 95 And now of sinne to all ensample bee: How then can sinfull flesh it selfe assure, Sith purest angels fell to be impure?

And abiect thrall, in fleshes fraile attyre, That he for him might pay sinnes deadly hyre, And him restore unto that happie state In which he stood before his haplesse fate.

Faith there ha's bene much to do on both sides: and the Nation holds it no sinne, to tarre them to Controuersie.

Nimph, in thy Orizons Be all my sinnes remembred.

I that, O this conscience makes cowardes of vs all, Lady in thy orizons, be all my sinnes remembred.

And the adulterous fault I haue committed: O these are sinnes that are vnpardonable: Why say thy sinnes were blacker then is ieat, Yet may contrition make them as white as snowe: I but still to perseuer in a sinne, It is an act gainst the vniuersall power, Most wretched man, stoope, bend thee to thy prayer, Aske grace of heauen to keepe thee from despaire.]

And the adulterous fault I haue committed: O these are sinnes that are vnpardonable: Why say thy sinnes were blacker then is ieat, Yet may contrition make them as white as snowe: I but still to perseuer in a sinne, It is an act gainst the vniuersall power, Most wretched man, stoope, bend thee to thy prayer, Aske grace of heauen to keepe thee from despaire.]

And the adulterous fault I haue committed: O these are sinnes that are vnpardonable: Why say thy sinnes were blacker then is ieat, Yet may contrition make them as white as snowe: I but still to perseuer in a sinne, It is an act gainst the vniuersall power, Most wretched man, stoope, bend thee to thy prayer, Aske grace of heauen to keepe thee from despaire.]

My wordes fly vp, my sinnes remaine below.

To my sicke soule (as sinnes true Nature is)

" p. 274, l. 16, for "whore," read "whore's;" and in the next line, for "sunnes," read "sinnes.

Ere thou beest drawne were the whole sex reduced To one, left only to preserve earths store, In the defence of women; who, but that The mothers virtues stands betweene heavens Justice Would for the daughters unexampled sinne Be by some soddaine Judgment swept from earth As creatures too infectious.

So farr transcending me, that twere a sinne Should I deprive you, the most perfect man, Of her, the perfectest woman.

I am one, To expresse my selfe in my true character, Soe full of civill reason and iust truth That to denie my owne peculiar act I should esteeme as base and black a sinne As Scythians doe adultery:

D'ee thinke it fitt To punish his suspition yet perswade To act the sinne he feares? Sir Fr.

It were a sinne To feare you can retract what both our lipps Have seal'd, and loose a happines so neare And so secure.

Sinns of the flesh they are perfect in; they know well enough what belongs to Adultery and simple fornication, but you would much improve and oblige the practise of the Court, if you could bring this sinne of fish under the Commission.

Moreouer, in this place are great store of dates, and flesh great store and good cheape, and especially laced muttons which willingly fall downe, and here the weary pilgrimes haue cummoditie to refresh themselues, saying, that this wicked fact purgeth them from a multitude of sinnes, and besides increaseth deuotion to prosecute the voiage.

The men of this place are giuen to that abhominable, cursed, and opprobrious vice, whereof both men and women make but small account by reason of the pond Zun Zun, wherein hauing washed themselues, their opinion is, that although like the dog they returne to their vomite, yet they are clensed from all sinne whatsoeuer, of which sin we will hereafter more largely discourse.

Moreouer, they say that when this stone fell from heauen, it was not blacke as now, but as white as the whitest snow, and by reason it hath bene so oft kissed by sinners, it is therewith become blacke: for all the pilgrimes are bound to kisse this stone, otherwise they cary their sinnes home with them again.

Also from the mountaine of pardons vntill they be passed the said pillers none dare looke backward, for feare least the sinnes which he hath left in the mountains returne to him againe.

A] all sinne and hell.

A] and know the sinne she acts.

Twenty-three lines ending life, monster, to, living, writ, you, men, Pelion, brasse, Pyramides, gods, faults, issues, wisedomes, off, self, King, sinne, soule, long, you, die, in't.

Audacious sinne, how canst thou make him say Consent to make my brothers sonne away? Fall.

I finde it true, for where thou art let in, There is no scruple made of any sinne; The world may see thou art the roote of ill, For but for thee poore Beech had lived still.

Know I am named Fallerio to deceive The world with shew of truth and honestie, But yet nor truth, nor honestie abides Within my thoughts, but falshood, crueltie, Blood-sucking Avarice, and all the sinnes, That hale men on to bloodie stratagems, Like to your selves, which care not how you gaine, By blood, extorcion, falshood, periurie, So you may have a pleasing recompence:

Desire to gaine began this desperate acte; Now plaine apparance of destruction, Of soule and body, waights upon my sinne.

Although we hide our sinnes from mortall men, Whose glasse of knowledge is the face of man, The eye of heaven beholdes our wickednesse, And will no doubt revenge the innocent, Rach.

Oh what a horror brings this beastlinesse, This chiefe of sinnes, this self-accusing crime Of murther!

Those little stickes, do hide the murthred course, But stickes, nor ought besides, can hide the sinne.

If he live long, and growe to riper sinne, [To the people.

But wretched Rachels sexe denies that grace, And therefore dooth receive a doome of death To dye with him whose sinnes she did conceale.

Ab imo cordis I repent my selfe Of all my sinnes against his maiestie; And, heavenly father, lay not to my charge The death of poore Pertillo and those men Which I suborn'd to be his murtherers, When I appeare before thy heavenlie throne To have my sentence or of life or death.

enough for to redeeme our soules Even from the verie gates of gaping hell, Forgive our sinnes and wash away our faults In the sweete river of that precious blood Which thy deare sonne did shed in Galgotha, For the remission of all contrite soules.

Weepe not sweete sister, for that cannot helpe: I doe confesse fore all this company That thou wert never privie to their deathes, But onelie helpest me, when the deede was done, To wipe the blood and hide away my sinne; And since this fault hath brought thee to this shame, I doe intreate thee on my bended knee To pardon me for thus offending thee.

I am prepar'd; oh God, receive my soule; Forgive my sinnes, for they are numberlesse.

Thus God forgive my sinnes, receive my soule!

Such as are sequestred And vowed unto a strict monasticke lyfe, Ought to putt off these grosse and prophane sinnes Most frequent amongst laye-men.

And then not only sinne unto them selves But tempt and persuade others?

Bewty and youthe to pitty 'tis no sinne.

Oh that grand maister Of mechall[90] lusts, that bulke of brothelree, That stillary of all infectious sinnes, Hath scapt the wrack, and with his fellowe guest And partner in corruption makes this waye, And with no tarde pace.

The trusty bark, ore laden with thy sinnes, Baudryes, grosse lyes, thy theft and perjuryes Beesydes the burdene of thy ill gott gooddes, Not able to indure so greate a weight Was forct to sinke beneathe them.

I built for prayer unto a bedd of sinnes!

And sinne itt weare such parity in all thinges, Age, mindes, wrecks, bondadge, pursiutes, injuryes Shoold nowe bee separate; the one be freede The t'other left in durance, for the want And pious tender of so smalle a somme.

Pull without feare or mercy, strangle him With all his sinnes about him; t'were not else A revendge worthe my fury.

Trifle not; The sinne will proove more serious.

The sinne it self, the churches malediction, As doone to one of a sequestred lyfe And holly order, the lawes penalty, Being duble forfeture of lyfe and state, Reproach, shame, infamy, all these incur'd Through my inconsiderate rashnes!

Of that gould No not the valewe of one poor deneere: 'Tis all base brokadge boathe of sinne and shame Of which wee neare weare guilty; yet inclosed There shall you find a cabinet of myne, Where boathe my naturall parents you may see In a small roome intended.

That which I took to bee meare fantasy I finde nowe to bee real; murder is A cryinge sinne, and canot be conceal'd.

Murder's a sinne Which often is myraculously reveal'd.

My death I pardon unto her and you, My sinnes God pardon; so vaine world adiew.

If my dread Lord will for my sake endure So strickt a calling, my bewitching haires Shall be made napkins to dry up the teares That true repentance wringeth from our hearts; Our sinnes we'l number with a thousand sighes, Fasting shall be the Steward of our Feast, Continuall prayer in stead of costly cates, And the remainder of our life a schoole To learne new lessons for the land of heaven.

Too true yfaith; Thou mightst as well put out the eie of day, Or cover sinne from heaven, or to erect A towre of sand on the uncertain surge, Or any thing that were more inficient, Then to remoove one doting thought of mine From her disdain.

Twere sinne to wrong the dead; you shall heare the inventorie of his pocket.

Why, sencelesse man in that sinne will betray His father, brother, nay, himselfe; feares not To commit the worst of evils, secure if Thunder-boults should drop from heaven, dreading Nor heaven, nor hell; indeede his best state Is worse then least, prised at highest rate.

Scottish witch Scythians Sentronell ( = centinel) Seven deadly sinnes, pageant of Shakespeare imitated; his use of the word road ("This Doll Tearsheet should be some road") illustrated; mentioned in Captain Underwit Sharpe, play at.

So Heywood in The English Traveller, iii. 1, "Pollute the Nuptiall bed with Michall [i.e. mechal] sinne."

In welchem Sinne hat sich die deutsche Philosophie jetzt wieder an Kant zu orientieren, 1847.

Plato considering the hurt that wine did to men, sayd, that the gods sent wine downe hither, partly for a punishment of their sinnes, that when they are drunke, one might kill another.

im eigentlichsten Sinne ein Buch fรผr die Familie.

And here is another:"Over common, then, in Spain, and elsewhere, which nevertheless chastise the world in such sort, but that this sinne is at this day more in use than ever it was, to the dishonor of our God, contempt of his laws, and confusion of all good order."

SEE Steiner, Rudolf. Die Welt der Sinne und die Welt des Geistes.

R105730, 14Jan53, Rudolf Steiner Nachlassverwaltung (PPW) Die Welt der Sinne und die Welt des Geistes; Vortrรคge, 27.

SEE Steiner, Rudolf. Die Welt der Sinne und die Welt des Geistes.

R105730, 14Jan53, Rudolf Steiner Nachlassverwaltung (PPW) Die Welt der Sinne und die Welt des Geistes; Vortrรคge, 27.

Rodogune Sinne.

Ode: Of our Sense of Sinne.

They will kill nothing not so much as a louse; for they holde it a sinne to kill any thing.

They say if they should be buried, it were a great sinne, for of their bodies there would come many wormes and other vermine, and when their bodies were consumed, those wormes would lacke sustenance; which were a sinne, therefore they will be burned.

They say if they should be buried, it were a great sinne, for of their bodies there would come many wormes and other vermine, and when their bodies were consumed, those wormes would lacke sustenance; which were a sinne, therefore they will be burned.

There be alwayes many people in it: for they say when they wash themselues in it, that their sinnes be forgiuen them, because God, as they say, did wash himselfe in that place.

I the wretched Claius Salute thy happy soyle, I that have liv'd Pelted with angry curses in a place As horrid as my griefes, the Lylibaean mountaines, These sixteene frozen winters; there have I Beene with rude out-lawes, living by such sinnes As runne o' th' score with justice 'gainst my prayers and wishes:

I "First, because Witchcraft is a rife and common sinne in these our daies, and very many are intangled with it, beeing either practitioners thereof in their owne persons, or at the least, yielding to seeke for helpe and counsell of such as practise it."

A, B and G] sinnes.

After this line A Adds]Hell open all thy gates, And I will thorough them; if they be shut, Ile batter um, but I will find the place Where the most damn'd have dwelling; ere I end, Amongst them all they shall not have a sinne, But I will call it mine: l. 5.

AD and G] 9 ll. farre, sinnes, teares, feele, brest, stand, eyes, world, me.

Mar. I confesse such fellowes Be in all royall Campes, and have, and must be To make the sinne of coward more detested In the meane Souldier, that with such a foyle Sets of much valour: By description I should now guesse him to you.

are you come to sell sinne yet?

But I may call it mine: I must beginne With murder of my friend, and so goe on To an incestuous ravishing, and end My life and sinnes with a forbidden blow Upon my selfe.

There is a method in mans wickednesse, It growes up by degrees; I am not come So high as killing of my selfe, there are A hundred thousand sinnes twixt me and it, Which I must doe, I shall come toot at last; But take my oath not now, be satisfied, And get thee hence.

Notwithstanding all thy sinnes, If thou hast hope, that there is yet a prayer To save thee, turne, and speake it to your selfe.

Sir, you shall know your sinnes before you doe um If you kill me.

Thou wicked mother of my sinnes, and me, Shew me the way to the inheritance I have by thee: which is a spacious world Of impious acts, that I may soone possesse it: Plagues rott thee, as thou liv'st, and such diseases As use to pay lust, recompence thy deed.