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84 examples of  snodgrass  in sentences

84 examples of snodgrass in sentences

Devore and Doyle, the first two batters for New York, were retired and Snodgrass hit cleanly to center field, the first base hit in the series.

Snodgrass was fooled into striking out, but Murray smashed the ball to center field for a single, and sent two men over the rubber, Murray was caught at second trying to get around the bases while Doyle was going home.

If Snodgrass, in making a desperate effort to catch the fly, had permitted the ball to go to Devore the chances are that Speaker's hit would have resulted in an out, so that New York lost on the play.

Snodgrass was safe in the sixth on Wagner's fumble, but was doubled off first when Murray drove a line hit straight to Stahl.

In the first inning Snodgrass began with a clean two-base hit into the left field seats but neither Doyle, Becker nor Murray was able to help him across the plate.

Yerkes batted a three-bagger out of the reach of Snodgrass and Hooper scored.

Snodgrass was the first batter and lifted an easy fly to Lewis.

Murray came through with a long two-bagger to left center and Snodgrass and Becker scored.

Then Snodgrass, Doyle and Becker were given bases on balls, filling the bags.

Neither team scored in the eleventh inning, although Snodgrass was hit by a pitched ball.

A long hit would have made the game easy for New York and Snodgrass tried to get the ball into the bleachers, but Lewis caught it.

Snodgrass hit safely to left field and Murray flied to Lewis.

Merkle batted the ball very hard, but Wagner made a good stop and caught Snodgrass at second.

With one out in New York's half of the inning Doyle batted safely, but Snodgrass forced him out.

Snodgrass batted to Yerkes, who made an extraordinarily good stop and threw Devore out at second.

Murray forced Snodgrass at second and all.

In the eighth, with two out, Snodgrass was safe on Wagner's fumble.

Devore received a base on balls in the first inning and after Doyle was out on a long fly to right was forced out by Snodgrass in a double play.

He stole second after Snodgrass struck out.

Snodgrass pushed a double to right field.

Devore was caught napping, but Snodgrass singled to right, scoring Doyle.

With two out for the Giants in the first Snodgrass was given a base on balls, but Murray was retired.

Doyle and Snodgrass were out in succession, Devore advancing, and then Murray doubled to center field and Devore scored.

Snodgrass singled and Murray fouled out.

It was a pop fly, which fell between three men, Fletcher, Murray and Snodgrass.

He rapped a long fly to center field which was perfectly played by Snodgrass, but the center fielder dropped the ball.

On top of his simple muff Snodgrass made a magnificent catch of Hooper's fly, which seemed to be good for three bases.

3 1 0 0 0 0 Yerkes, 2b 4 0 1 0 1 0 Doyle, 2b 4 1 2 2 7 0 Speaker, c.f 3 1 1 0 1 0 Snodgrass, c.f. 4 0 1 2 0 0 Lewis, l.f. 4 0 0 2 0 0 Murray, r.f. 3 0 1 1 0 0 Gardner, 3b 4 0 0 1 1 0 Merkle, 1b 3 1 1 12 0 0 Stahl, 1b 4 0 0 6 1 0

Wood 11, Devore, Snodgrass, Merkle, Herzog, Meyers, Fletcher 3, Tesreau 2, Crandall; by Tesreau 4, Hooper, Speaker, Stahl, Gardner; by Crandall 2, Stahl, Gardner.

R. H. P. A. E. Snodgrass, l.f-r.f 4 1 1 0 0 0 Hooper, r.f.

Mathewson 4, Stahl, Collins 2, Wagner; by Collins 6, Doyle, Merkle, Mathewson 2, Snodgrass; by Bedient 1, Doyle.

Bases on ballsBy Hall 4, Snodgrass, Doyle, Becker, Meyers; by Bedient 1, Becker.

Hit by pitcherBy Bedient, Snodgrass.

4 0 2 2 0 0 Hooper, r.f. 3 0 0 1 0 0 Doyle, 2b 3 0 0 3 1 0 Yerkes, 2b 4 0 1 3 1 0 Snodgrass, c.f.

Devore, l.f. 4 0 1 0 0 0 Yerkes, 2b 3 0 1 2 5 0 Doyle, 2b 4 0 1 4 1 0 Speaker, c.f. 4 0 1 2 0 0 Snodgrass, c.f. 4 0 0 2 0 0 Lewis, l.f. 4 0 0 1 0 0

Wood 8, Devore, Snodgrass.

Mathewson 2, Gardner, Wagner; by Bedient 4, Devore, Snodgrass, Merkle, Mathewson.

Marquard 3, Wagner, Gardner, Stahl; by O'Brien 1, Snodgrass; by Collins 1, Devore.

3 0 1 1 1 0 Doyle, 2b 4 3 3 2 3 2 Yerkes, 2b 4 0 0 1 4 0 Snodgrass, c.f. 5 1 2 1 0 0 Speaker, c.f.

Bases on ballsBy Mathewson 5, Yerkes, Speaker, Lewis, Gardner, Wagner; by Bedient 3, Devore, Snodgrass, Meyers; by Wood 1, Devore.

10 2 2 Doyle......................... 8 33 5 8 2 .. 15 26 4 Snodgrass..................... 8 33 2 7 1 ..

New York: Murray 4, Herzog 4, Snodgrass 2, Merkle 2, Fletcher 1, Doyle 1; total 14.

Fletcher and Herzog 1; Fletcher and Merkle 1; Fletcher, Doyle and Merkle 1; Devore and Meyers 1. Struck out by Boston pitchersBy Wood: Merkle 3, Tesreau 3, Fletcher 3, Devore 2, Snodgrass 2, Herzog 2, Meyers 2, Murray 2, Crandall 1, Mathewson 1, total 21.

By Collins: Doyle 1, Merkle 1, Snodgrass 1, Devore 1, Mathewson 2; total 6.

By Bedient: Doyle 1, Devore 1, Snodgrass 1, Mathewson 1, Fletcher 1, Merkle 2; total 7.

Devore 1, Merkle 1, Meyers 1, Snodgrass 1; total 4.

Off Hall: Doyle 2, Devore 2, Snodgrass 1, Becker 1.

Off Bedient: Devore 3, Becker 1, Murray 1, Snodgrass 1, Meyers 1; total 7.

Doyle 1, Snodgrass 1; total 4. Muffed foul flyMerkle 1, Cady 1, Stahl 1; total 3. Muffed thrown ballsWilson 1, Merkle 1, Gardner 2, Doyle 1, Wagner 1; total 6.

Sacrifice fliesHerzog 2, McCormick 1, Hooper 1, Gardner 1; total 5. Hit by pitcherBy Bedient: Snodgrass 1, Herzog 1.

Murray 8 23 1 1000|Lewis 8 14 1 .933 Becker 1 1 1000|Speaker 8 21 2 2 .920 Hooper 8 16 3 1000|Devore 7 10 2 2 .857 Snodgrass 8 17 1 1 .947|

Years later something would happen and we'd yell to Murray, 'Hey Red, is that right in your gut?' "There were a lot of grand guys on that club: Christy Mathewson and Chief Meyers, Larry Doyle and Fred Snodgrass, Al Bridwell and Bugs Raymond.

"M'Kendrick and Snodgrass's Physiology of the Senses.]

But Mrs. Bardell had fainted in his arms, and before he could gain time to deposit her on a chair, Master Bardell entered the room, followed by Mr. Pickwick's friends Mr. Tupman, Mr. Winkle, and Mr. Snodgrass.

The next witness was Mr. Winkle, and after him came Mr. Tupman, and Mr. Snodgrass, all of whom appeared on subpoena by the plaintiff's lawyers.

" Before Mr. Pickwick could reply, there was a low murmuring of voices outside, and a hesitating knock at the door; and Mr. Winkle, Mr. Tupman, and Mr. Snodgrass entering most opportunely, at last, by their united pleadings, Mr. Pickwick was fairly argued out of his resolutions.

Thus, on one occasion, he woke up at three in the morning a certain Mr. Snodgrass, and when the worthy put his head out of the window in alarm, said quietly, 'Pray, sir, is your name Snodgrass?''Yes, sir, it is Snodgrass.'

Thus, on one occasion, he woke up at three in the morning a certain Mr. Snodgrass, and when the worthy put his head out of the window in alarm, said quietly, 'Pray, sir, is your name Snodgrass?''Yes, sir, it is Snodgrass.'

'Snodgrass Snodgrassit is a very singular name.

Good-bye, Mr. Snodgrass.'

" "I wanted to play the part of Snodgrass; but they couldn't think of giving me that, of course.

" Mr. Pickwick found it in vain to protest his innocence, so hurried down-stairs into the street, whither he was closely followed by Mr. Tupman, Mr. Winkle, and Mr. Snodgrass.

SEE Snodgrass, Lloyd I. Pin money.

SNODGRASS, LLOYD I. Photography self taught.

Illustrated by David Snodgrass.

SNODGRASS, CHARLES ALBERT.

Charles A. Snodgrass (A); 8Jul60; R250295.

SEE SANDERSON, L. O. SNODGRASS, R. E. Principles of insect morphology.

Ruth Snodgrass (W); 6May63; R315286.

SNODGRASS, RUTH.

SEE SNODGRASS, R. E. SNOW, CHARLES H. Cardigan cowboy.

Edward Sculley Bradley (A) & Josephine Reese Stevenson Snodgrass (W); 18Oct74; R588150.

SEE Snodgrass, Lloyd I. Pin money.

SNODGRASS, LLOYD I. Photography self taught.

Illustrated by David Snodgrass.

SNODGRASS, CHARLES ALBERT.

Charles A. Snodgrass (A); 8Jul60; R250295.

SEE SANDERSON, L. O. SNODGRASS, R. E. Principles of insect morphology.

Ruth Snodgrass (W); 6May63; R315286.

SNODGRASS, RUTH.

SEE SNODGRASS, R. E. SNOW, CHARLES H. Cardigan cowboy.

Edward Sculley Bradley (A) & Josephine Reese Stevenson Snodgrass (W); 18Oct74; R588150.

I gathered the principal facts of his life at the Capitol, stated them to Dr. Snodgrass, a prominent Washington correspondent, whose anti-slavery paper had been suppressed in Baltimore by a mob, to Joshua R

SNODGRASS, AUGUSTUS, a member of the Pickwick Club in the "Pickwick Papers.