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473 examples of  stoke  in sentences

473 examples of stoke in sentences

He also vanquished the army of the pretender at Stoke, in June, 1487.

Much the same must be said of Itchen Abbas, Itchen A Bas, where the road falls to the river, the small Norman church there having been both rebuilt and enlarged in or about 1863, while an even worse fate has befallen the church of Itchen Stoke, two miles further on, for it has disappeared altogether.

The old road did not pass through it as the modern road does; for as Mr Belloc seems to have proved the Pilgrim's Way, which descended to the river at Itchen A Bas as we have seen, crossed the ford at Itchen Stoke, Itchen Stakes that is, and proceeded east by south where the workhouse now stands, coming into the modern road again at Bishop Sutton.

Now there had been great doings that morning, for a certain yeoman named Egbert, who came from Stoke over in Staffordshire, had thrown with ease all those that came against him; but a man of Denby, well known through all the countryside as William of the Scar, had been biding his time with the Stoke man; so, when Egbert had thrown everyone else, stout William leaped into the ring.

Now there had been great doings that morning, for a certain yeoman named Egbert, who came from Stoke over in Staffordshire, had thrown with ease all those that came against him; but a man of Denby, well known through all the countryside as William of the Scar, had been biding his time with the Stoke man; so, when Egbert had thrown everyone else, stout William leaped into the ring.

Also, the sun made itself felt, electric fans buzzed everywhere, and perspiring in utter indolence beneath the awnings, one thought in sympathy of those damned souls below, in the hell of the stoke-hole.

At the request of his wife I dined at their house with twenty-five young culprits, whom J.S. has in his Reformatory at Stoke, near Bromsgrove.

" His remains were interred at Stoke Newington, on the 18th of the Eighth Month.

I hope you haven't waited?" "Your hope is not in vain, young man," replied Howard, suavely; "but I will come and sit beside you while you stoke.

The captain, as he hastened down a companionway, muttered angrily beneath his breath about water in the stoke room.

Stoke Poges Churchyard.

CRAIK John Halifax, Gentleman Dinah Maria Mulock, whose fame as a novelist rests entirely on "John Halifax, Gentleman," was born at Stoke-upon-Trent, England, on April 20, 1826.

Philip Bliss found record in a History of Nantwich of a monument there in St. Mary's Church, erected by Geoffrey Minshull of Stoke, Esq., to the memory of his ancestors.

Born at Kibworth-Harcourt, Leicestershire, Eng., June 20, 1743; died at Stoke-Newington, Mar. 9, 1825.

The weather is beginning to stoke-up, as Boggley calls it, and during the day the tent is insufferable.

I don't believe you'll care to go into the stoke-hole.

From that position he could look down into the stoke-hole and see the black, grimy, sweating, half-clad men at work there.

He landed in the stoke-hole without being severely injured.

"I was attacked from behind and thrown into the stoke-hole," Merry explained.

" "Thrown into the stoke-hole?" "Yes." "From where?" "The grating at the foot of the first ladder.

Now if you go out and tell you were thrown into the stoke-hole, there'll be any amount of fuss over it.

" "Did you see the man who threw you into the stoke-hole?"

"No one can swear I attacked this fellow and threw him into the stoke-hole!"

Then he related how he had visited the engine room and been thrown into the stoke-hole.

" "And you escaped after being thrown into the stoke-hole?"

Spent cartridges at the head of the stoke-hole ladder told of a desperate fight there, probably before the attack on the bridge by the engineer and his men.

One hears now of the Chauston, the Halstead Placevery noted indeedthe Hulton, the Leigh Park, the Stoke Place, the Edinburgh, the Surbiton, the Trinity Foot, the Wooddale, Mrs. G. W. Hilliard's, Mrs. Price's, and Mrs. Turner's.

To coal and iron mines, to freight trains, to fishing fleets in December, to dish-washing, clothes-washing, and window-washing, to road-building and tunnel-making, to foundries and stoke-holes, and to the frames of skyscrapers, would our gilded youths be drafted off, according to their choice, to get the childishness knocked out of them, and to come back into society with healthier sympathies and soberer ideas.

There cannot be the smallest doubt it will be realised, and when the young dukes, landed proprietors, financiers, motorists, officers in the Guards, barristers, and curates are marched off in gangs to their apportioned labour in the stoke-holes, coal-mines, and December fishing fleets, how the workmen will laugh, how exult!

STOKE POGES CHURCH.

[Illustration: Stoke Poges Church.

How those lines run in one's head this bright summer evening, as from our railway carriage we note the great white dome of Stoke House peeping out amid the elms!

It was doubtless the sight of those eighteen great hatchments which still hang in the little church at Stoke Poges that inspired Gray to attune his harp to such lofty strains.

Who that has ever visited the village of Stoke Poges in Buckinghamshire will forget the lane by which he approached the home and last resting-place of the poet Gray?

Very similar to the quiet and leafy lane at Stoke Poges is the brook below the waterfall at A in the Cotswolds.

But what are you going to do?" "Oh, I'll sit up a bit longer and stoke.

" At night I would frequently sally forth to a cracked up village behind, and perhaps procure half a mantelpiece and an old clog to stoke our "furnace" with.

This school was at Stoke Newington, a quiet, old-fashioned country town, only a few miles out from London.

Gray, thinking himself too poor to study the law, sent his mother and a maiden sister to reside at Stoke, near Windsor, and retired to Peterhouse, Cambridge, where he resumed his classical and poetical pursuits.

To the same dear friend he sent his "Ode to Spring," which he had written under his mother's roof at Stoke.

He was buried by the side of his mother, in the churchyard of Stoke.

ADVERTISEMENT.Gray's 'Elegy,' previous to its publication, was handed about in MS., and had, amongst other admirers, the Lady Cobham, who resided in the mansion-house at Stoke-Pogeis.

[Footnote 1: 'Pile of building:' the mansion-house at Stoke-Pogeis, then in the possession of Viscountess Cobham.

The three Hundreds of Desborough, Stoke, and Burnham, in Bucks, are called the "Chiltern Hundreds," and take their name from the Chalk Hills which run through Bucks and the neighbouring counties.

Close under the steep northern face of Hamdon is Stoke, with a quaint, and delightful inn known as the "Fleur de Lis," and a beautiful old church with a Norman tympanum, an elaborate chancel arch of the same date, and many other gracious and interesting details.

Stoke Wake village is just below and Mappowder is about two miles away by the fields, but much farther by road.

Liverpool, the Regulator, through Wolverhampton, Stafford, Stone, Stoke, Hanley, Burslem, Lawton, Sandbach, Middlewich, and Northwich, every morning, at six.

*** A Stoke Newington constable has discovered a happy method of taking people's minds off their food troubles.

As a more direct and frequent stimulus a quart of rum was served weekly to each of three drivers, three carpenters, four boilers, two head cattlemen, two head mulemen, the "stoke-hole boatswain," and the black doctor, and to the foremen respectively of the sawyers, coopers, blacksmiths, watchmen, and road wainmen, and a pint weekly to the head home wainman, the potter, the midwife, and the young children's field nurse.

In the engine room there are six enginesone for driving the boat, two for compressing the air for the torpedoes, an engine for working the dynamo for producing the electric light, an engine for forcing air into the stoke-hole, and an engine working in conjunction with the distilling apparatus for supplying drinking water for the crew and the waste incidental to the boiler.

She married, in July, 1802, Charles Stoke Dudley, a merchant, and she died in February of the following year, and was buried at Bunhill Fields.

The Stoke silver case.

The Stoke silver case, by Lynn Brock, pseud. of Alister McAllister.

STOKE, MELIS.

SEE Stoke, Melis.

HILL, NORMAN L. The background of European governments. by Norman L. Hill & Harold W. Stoke.

Norman L. Hill & Harold W. Stoke (A); 24Oct62; R304939. HILL, PATTY SMITH.

STOKE, HAROLD W. Background of European governments.

John F. Learning (A); 3Aug64; R343777. LE FEVRE, LAURA Z. Stoke of Brier Hill, by Zenobia Bird, pseud.

Mabel Betsy Hill (A); 25Apr68; R434863. HILL, NORMAN L. The background of European governments, by Norman L. Hill & Harold W. Stoke.

Norman L. Hill & Harold W. Stoke (A); 30Nov67; R425626. HILL, WYCLIFFE A. Coloring your dialogue.

For works claimed by Helen Seitter Stocklen SEE Seitter, Pearle. STOKE, HAROLD W. The background of European governments. SEE Hill, Norman L. STOKOWSKI, LEOPOLD.

The Stoke silver case.

The Stoke silver case, by Lynn Brock, pseud. of Alister McAllister.

SEE Stoke, Melis.

STOKE, MELIS.

HILL, NORMAN L. The background of European governments. by Norman L. Hill & Harold W. Stoke.

Norman L. Hill & Harold W. Stoke (A); 24Oct62; R304939. HILL, PATTY SMITH.

STOKE, HAROLD W. Background of European governments.

Mabel Betsy Hill (A); 25Apr68; R434863. HILL, NORMAN L. The background of European governments, by Norman L. Hill & Harold W. Stoke.

Norman L. Hill & Harold W. Stoke (A); 30Nov67; R425626. HILL, WYCLIFFE A. Coloring your dialogue.

For works claimed by Helen Seitter Stocklen SEE Seitter, Pearle. STOKE, HAROLD W. The background of European governments. SEE Hill, Norman L. STOKOWSKI, LEOPOLD.

In Northamptonshire he had nine lordships; one of which, Stoke, acquired the additional name of Albini, when it came into the possession of his son."

Azuma-zi had come, clad in white but insufficient raiment, out of the stoke-hole of the Lord Clive, from the Straits Settlements and beyond, into London.

Azuma-zi, answering or misunderstanding the questions of the people who had by authority or impudence come into the shed, was presently sent back to the stoke-hole by the scientific manager.

" "My Good Woman," said the Man from Stoke-on-Tritham, just as if he meant to Prorogue something.

LYNAM, C., F.R.I.B.A., Stoke-On-Trent.

But surviving instances of churches wholly or mainly Norman are rare: the best examples are Compton Martin, Christon, and Stoke-sub-Hamdon.

Of Norman chancel arches and doorways retained when the body of the church has been re-constructed the examples are numerous; noteworthy are those at Glastonbury, Milborne Port, Stoke-Courcy, Lullington, Huish Episcopi, Portbury, St Catherine, South Stoke, Flax Bourton, Langridge, Clevedon, Chewton Mendip, Englishcombe.

Of Norman chancel arches and doorways retained when the body of the church has been re-constructed the examples are numerous; noteworthy are those at Glastonbury, Milborne Port, Stoke-Courcy, Lullington, Huish Episcopi, Portbury, St Catherine, South Stoke, Flax Bourton, Langridge, Clevedon, Chewton Mendip, Englishcombe.

The W. front of Wells is a beautiful example of E.E., and windows of this period occur at E. Stoke, Bathampton, Chedzoy, Martock, Keynsham, Somerton.

There are E.E. arcades at St Cuthbert's, Wells, and further illustrations of E.E. work are furnished by Compton Bishop, Creech St Michael, Stoke St Gregory, etc.

In most instances the tower is at the W. end, and is square; but a few churches have octagonal towers, which are usually central (S. Petherton, Stoke St Gregory, Doulting, N. Curry, Barrington).

Castles are infrequent in the county, the chief remains being at Taunton, Dunster, and Nunney, and a few fragments at Stoke-Courcey, Harptree, Farleigh Hungerford, and Nether Stowey.

Othery, East Stoke, Ile Abbots).

A priory of Benedictine nuns, founded by a De Courcy (of Stoke Courcy) in 1138, once existed here.

Cheddon Fitzpaine, a parish 2 m. N.E. of Taunton, preserving, like Stoke Courcy, Stoke Gomer, Norton Fitzwarren, the name of its Norman lord.

Cheddon Fitzpaine, a parish 2 m. N.E. of Taunton, preserving, like Stoke Courcy, Stoke Gomer, Norton Fitzwarren, the name of its Norman lord.

It has a fine church resembling in plan its neighbour of Stoke St Gregory, being cruciform, with a central octagonal tower.

Draycott, a hamlet 4 m. E.S.E. of Axbridge, with a modern church (note font) and a station that serves Rodney Stoke.

Hidden away amongst the trees are the remains of a rampart, Stoke Leigh Camp, one of twin fortifications.

Note, too, (1) stoup outside N. porch; (2) fragments in S. porch of the same zodiacal signs that appear at Stoke-sub-Hamdon; (3) piscinas (especially that in the chancel); (4) tomb of Sir Giles Daubeny (d. 1445) and one of his wives, with a fine brass (there is also a brass to his second wife on the floor, concealed by matting); (5) 17th-cent.

Another pleasant walk can be taken in Hawkcombe valley (past W. end of church); whilst a third, passing "Doverhay," may terminate at the Horner Valley (L.), or at Stoke Pero (R.).

It is a large village at the foot of the Brendons, and preserves in its name the memory of its Norman lord, Stogumber being a corruption of Stoke Gomer (cp. Stogursey).

Stoke Pero a parish on the edge of Exmoor, 3-1/2 m. S. of Porlock.

Stoke St Gregory), (3) the W. door, made of one solid block of wood; over the entrance is the date 1500.

Thus in Archbishop Parker's Visitation Articles for the diocese of Canterbury in the year 1569, he requires all churchwardens to report to their ordinaries "whether there be any money or stoke, appertaininge to any paryshe churche, in anye manne's handes, that refuse or differeth to paye the same

When John Fletcher, "a meere stranger lately come into this Parish with his wife and children," took certain parcels of land in Severn Stoke in 1593, and was suspected of the intention to build a cottage without laying to it the requisite number of acres, the parishioners immediately complained to the Worcester justices, for they wanted to provide against the contingent liability of having to support the inmates.

Thus ยฃ4 is paid for one and a half years' rental of parish land lying in Severn Stoke parish; 44s.

BRASSES, sepulchral tablets of a mixed metal, called latten, inlaid in a slab of stone, and insculpt with figures and inscriptions of a monumental character; the oldest in England is at Stoke d'Abernon, in Surrey. BRASSEY, THOMAS, a great railway contractor, born in Cheshire; contracted for the construction of railways in all parts of the world (1805-1870).