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483 examples of  thrale  in sentences

483 examples of thrale in sentences

Johnson mentions him in a letter to Mrs. Thrale in 1778.

My answer, which were (sic) the words of advice he gave to Mr. Thrale the day he dyed, he resented extremely from me."' Mr. Alfred Morrison's Collection of Autographs, &c., ii. 343.

'The words of advice' which were given to Mr. Thrale the day before the fatal fit seized him, were that he should abstain from full meals.

We began talking of Irene, and Mrs. Thrale made Dr. Johnson read some passages which I had been remarking as uncommonly applicable to the present time.

Dr. T. Campbell (Diary, p. 34) recorded in 1775, that 'when Mrs. Thrale quoted something from Foster's Sermons, Johnson flew in a passion, and said that Foster was a man of mean ability, and of no original thinking.'

Yet he gave lessons in Latin to Miss Burney and Miss Thrale.

Mrs. Thrale wrote to Johnson in May, 1780:-'Blackmore will be rescued from the old wits who worried him much to your disliking; so, a little for love of his Christianity, a little for love of his physic, a little for love of his courageand a little for love of contradiction, you will save him from his malevolent critics, and perhaps do him the honour to devour him yourself.'

It was not Molly Aston (ante i. 83) but Miss Hill Boothby (ib.) of whom Mrs. Thrale wrote.

After the quarrel had been carried even into the drawing-room, Mrs. Thrale, 'with great spirit and dignity, said that she should be very glad to hear no more of it.

Thursday morning, Dr. Johnson went to town for some days, but not before Mrs. Thrale read him a very serious lecture upon giving way to such violence; which he bore with a patience and quietness that even more than made his peace with me.'

"It was behaving ill to Mrs. Thrale certainly to quarrel in her house.

Mr. Thrale had removed, that is to say, from his winter residence in the Borough.

Miss Burney describes a dinner at Mr. Thrale's, about this time, at which she met Johnson, Boswell, and Dudley Long.

'Mrs. Thrale,' wrote Miss Burney in 1780, 'is a most dear creature, but never restrains her tongue in anything, nor, indeed, any of her feelings.

Thrale, with all her excellence, can give up no occasion of making sport, however unseasonable or even painful...

'Mrs. Garrick and I,' wrote Hannah More (Memoirs, i. 208), 'were invited to an assembly at Mrs. Thrale's.

Just as my hair was dressed, came a servant to forbid our coming, for that Mr. Thrale was dead.

The rest of the entry should be given:'On Wednesday, 11, was buried my dear friend Thrale, who died on Wednesday 4; and with him were buried many of my hopes and pleasures.

I staid in the room, except that I visited Mrs. Thrale twice.]

What a contrast in this to the widow who published a letter in which she had written:'I wish that you would put in a word of your own to Mr. Thrale about eating less!'

Baretti, in a note on Piozzi Letters, ii.142, says that 'nobody ever had spirit enough to tell Mr. Thrale that his fits were apoplectic; such is the blessing of being rich that nobody dares to speak out.'

In Johnson's Works (1787), xi.203, it is recorded that 'Johnson, who attended Thrale in his last moments, said, "His servants would have waited upon him in this awful period, and why not his friend?"' [280] Johnson's letters to the widow show how much he felt Thrale's death. '

In Johnson's Works (1787), xi.203, it is recorded that 'Johnson, who attended Thrale in his last moments, said, "His servants would have waited upon him in this awful period, and why not his friend?"' [280] Johnson's letters to the widow show how much he felt Thrale's death. '

On his next birthday, he wrote:'My first knowledge of Thrale was in 1765.

One or two passages in Mrs. Thrale's Letters shew her husband's affection for Johnson.

On May 3, 1776, she writes:'Mr. Thrale says he shall not die in peace without seeing Rome, and I am sure he will go nowhere that he can help without you.'

Johnson, in his fine epitaph on Thrale (Works, i.153) broke through a rule which he himself had laid down.

Johnson's letters to Mrs. Thrale shew that he had long been well acquainted with the state of her husband's business.

In the year 1772, Mr. Thrale was in money difficulties.

Beattie wrote on June 1:'Everybody says Mr. Thrale should have left Johnson ยฃ200 a year; which, from a fortune like his, would have been a very inconsiderable deduction.'

Miss Burney thus writes of the day of the sale:'Mrs. Thrale went early to town, to meet all the executors, and Mr. Barclay, the Quaker, who was the bidder.

Four o'clock came and dinner was ready, and no Mrs. Thrale.

Baretti, in a MS. note on Piozzi Letters, i. 369, says that 'the two last years of Thrale's life his brewery brought him ยฃ30,000 a year neat profit.'

(Like Mrs. Thrale and Miss Burney, she cared nothing for dates.)

It was in the week after Thrale's death.

"I wonder," said Mrs. Thrale, "you bear with my nonsense."

"Oh," cried Mrs. Thrale, blushing, "it is my turn to go under the table this morning, Miss Burney."

"Bet Flint!" cried Mrs. Thrale.

Johnson wrote to Mrs. Thrale on Aug. 14, 1780:'If you want events, Here is Mr. Levett just come in at fourscore from a walk to Hampstead, eight miles, in August.'

He had written also to Mrs. Thrale, but her affection, it should seem from this, he was beginning to doubt.

What he says of friendship renders it almost certain that the letter was written while he had still Thrale; and him he lost in April, 1781.

Had it been written after June, 1779, but before Thrale's death, the account given of health would have been even better than it is (ante, iii. 397).

A farm in the Isle of Skye, where Johnson wrote his Latin Ode to Mrs. Thrale.

Over the bookcases were hung Sir Joshua's portraits of Mr. Thrale's friendsBaretti, Burke, Burney, Chambers, Garrick, Goldsmith, Johnson, Murphy, Reynolds, Lord Sandys, Lord Westcote, and in the same picture Mrs. Thrale and her eldest daughter.'

Over the bookcases were hung Sir Joshua's portraits of Mr. Thrale's friendsBaretti, Burke, Burney, Chambers, Garrick, Goldsmith, Johnson, Murphy, Reynolds, Lord Sandys, Lord Westcote, and in the same picture Mrs. Thrale and her eldest daughter.'

Mr. Thrale's portrait was also there.

This means, I think, 'so far as it might be lawful, I prayed for Thrale.'

17-end], and then read fortuitously in the gospels, which was my parting use of the library.' Johnson, no doubt, was leaving Streatham because Mrs. Thrale was leaving it. '

Johnson was not yet leaving the Thrale family, for he joined them at Brighton, and he was living with them the following spring in Argyll-street.

Nevertheless, if, as all Mrs. Thrale's friends strongly held, her second marriage was blameworthy, Boswell's remark admits of defence.

Miss Burney in her diary and letters keeps the secret which Mrs. Thrale had confided to her of her attachment to Mr. Piozzi; but in the Memoirs of Dr. Burney, which, as Mme.

As Mrs. Thrale became more and more dissatisfied with her own situation, and impatient for its relief, she slighted Johnson's counsel, and avoided his society.'

"' Johnson's letter to Langton of March 20, 1782 (ante, p. 145), in which he says that he was 'musing in his chamber at Mrs. Thrale's,' shews that so early as that date he foresaw that a change was coming.

Boswell's statement that 'Mrs. Thrale became less assiduous to please Johnson,' might have been far more strongly worded.

Lord Shelburne, who as Prime Minister was negotiating peace with the United States, France, and Spain, hired Mrs. Thrale's house 'in order to be constantly near London.'

Streathamiam quando revisam?' 'Mr. Metcalfe is much with Dr. Johnson, but seems to have taken an unaccountable dislike to Mrs. Thrale, to whom he never speaks....

Boswell should have shown, for he must have known it, that Johnson was Mrs. Thrale's guest at Brighton.

Mr. Pepys joined Dr. Johnson, with whom he entered into an argument, in which he was so roughly confuted, and so severely ridiculed, that he was hurt and piqued beyond all power of disguise, and, in the midst of the discourse, suddenly turned from him, and, wishing Mrs. Thrale goodnight, very abruptly withdrew.

To me only I think he is now kind, for Mrs. Thrale fares worse than anybody.'

Mr. Cumberland assures me, that he was always treated with great courtesy by Dr. Johnson, who, in his Letters to Mrs. Thrale, vol.

The report, however, gave occasion to a poem, not without characteristical merit, entitled, 'Ode to Mrs. Thrale, by Samuel Johnson, LL.D. on their supposed approaching Nuptials; printed for Mr. Faulder in Bond-street.'

To rich felicity thus raised, My bosom glows with amorous fire; Porter no longer shall be praised, 'Tis I MYSELF am Thrale's Entire' See ante, ii. 44.

[1202] Mrs. Thrale's Collection, March 10,1784.

On the same subject, in his Letter to Mrs. Thrale, dated Nov. 29, 1783, he makes the following just observation:'Life, to be worthy of a rational being, must be always in progression; we must always purpose to do more or better than in time past.

Johnson wrote five years earlier to Mrs. Thrale about her husband's will:'Do not let those fears prevail which you know to be unreasonable; a will brings the end of life no nearer.'

He was the nephew and ward of Mr. Thrale, who seemed to think that Miss Burney would make him a good wife.

Dr. Johnson's Latin ode to Mrs. Thrale. September 7.

To Mrs. Thrale in particular, whose enchantment over him seldom failed, I was much obliged.

Through paths that halt from stone to stone, Amid the din of tongues unknown, One image haunts my soul alone, Thine, gentle Thrale!

Mr. Thrale's bill at the inn for dinner was eighteen shillings and tenpence.

Mrs. Thrale lost her purse.

Mrs. Thrale gave her what help she could.

Meeting by chance with one Troughton, an intelligent and loquacious wanderer, Mr. Thrale invited him to dinner.

We went to visit Bodville, the place where Mrs. Thrale was born; and the Churches called Tydweilliog and Llangwinodyl, which she holds by impropriation.

Mrs. Thrale remembered the rooms, and wandered over them with recollection of her childhood.

On the desk, I think, of each lay a folio Welsh Bible of the black letter, which the curate cannot easily read.[1230] Mr. Thrale purposes to beautify the Churches, and if he prospers, will probably restore the tithes.

Mrs. Thrale visited a house where she had been used to drink milk, which was left, with an estate of two hundred pounds a year, by one Lloyd, to a married woman who lived with him.

We returned to Bangor, where Mr. Thrale was lodged at Mr. Roberts's, the Register.

In the wall are several breaches, made, as Mr. Thrale very reasonably conjectures, by fragments of rocks which roll down the mountain, broken perhaps by frost, or worn through by rain.

To spare the horses at Penmaen Rhรดs, between Conway and St. Asaph, we sent the coach over the road across the mountain with Mrs. Thrale, who had been tired with a walk sometime before; and I, with Mr. Thrale and Miss, walked along the edge, where the path is very narrow, and much encumbered by little loose stones, which had fallen down, as we thought, upon the way since we passed it before.

To spare the horses at Penmaen Rhรดs, between Conway and St. Asaph, we sent the coach over the road across the mountain with Mrs. Thrale, who had been tired with a walk sometime before; and I, with Mr. Thrale and Miss, walked along the edge, where the path is very narrow, and much encumbered by little loose stones, which had fallen down, as we thought, upon the way since we passed it before.

When Mrs. Siddons, with whom, in a letter to Mrs. Thrale, he expressed himself highly pleased, paid him a visit, there happened not to be any chair ready for her.

THRALE, ON HER COMPLETING HER THIRTY-FIFTH YEAR.

The epitaph, in Stretham church, on Mr. Thrale, abounds with inaccuracies; and those who are fond of detecting little blunders in great men, may be amply gratified in the perusal of a review of Thrale's epitaph in the Classical Journal, xii.

Piozziana; or, Recollections of the late Mrs. Piozzi (Johnson's Mrs. Thrale), was published in 1833.

Ninety years ago, one of the pleasantest houses near London, for the society that gathered within it, was Mr., or rather, Mrs. Thrale's, at Streatham Park.

One day, in 1769, Dr. Johnson delivered him "a very polite card" from Mr. and Mrs. Thrale, inviting him to Streatham.

"Mrs. Thrale and her eldest daughter were in one piece, over the fireplace, at full length.

Mr. Thrale was over the door leading to his study.

The general collection then began by Lord Sandys and Lord Westcote, (Lyttelton,) two early noble friends of Mr. Thrale.

Stukely, the archaeological writer, gives a definite date460 B.C.as that of their erection, and Dr. Johnson, writing to Mrs. Thrale, says:"It is, in my opinion, to be referred to the earliest habitations of the island as a druidical monument of, at least, two thousand years, probably the most ancient work of man upon the island."

THRALE, H. WALPOLE.

This year was also distinguished by his being introduced into the family of Mr. Thrale, an eminent brewer, who was member for Southwark.

Dr. Goldsmith died on April 4 of the following year, a year in which I was unable to pay my usual spring visit to London, and in which Johnson made a long autumn tour in Wales with Mr. and Mrs. Thrale.

" This year, too, my great friend again came out as a politician, for parliament having been dissolved in September, and Mr. Thrale, who was a steady supporter of government, having again to encounter the storm of a contested election in Southwark, Johnson published a short political pamphlet, entitled "The Patriot," addressed to the electors of Great Britain.

In the autumn Dr. Johnson went to Ashbourne to France with Mr. and Mrs. Thrale and Mr. Baretti, which lasted about two months.

He thus mentions them, together with honest Levett, in one of his letters to Mrs. Thrale: "Williams hates everybody; Levett hates Desmoulins, and does not love WilliamsDesmoulins hates them both; Poll (Miss Carmichael) loves none of them.

I found on visiting his friend, Mr. Thrale, that he was now very ill, and had removedI suppose by the solicitation of Mrs. Thraleto a house in Grosvenor Square.

The first evening that I was with him at Thrale's, I observed he poured a large quantity of it into a glass, and swallowed it greedily.

Soon afterwards he had the mortification of being informed by Mrs. Thrale that she was actually going to marry Signor Piozzi, a papist, and her daughter's music-master.