Inspirassion

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177 example sentences with  tsz

177 example sentences with tsz

The disciple Tsz-hiá said, "The appreciation of worth in men of worth, thus diverting the mind from lascivious desiresministering to parents while one is the most capable of so doingserving one's ruler when one is able to devote himself entirely to that objectbeing sincere in one's language in intercourse with friends: this I certainly must call evidence of learning, though others may say there has been 'no learning.'"

Tsz-kung answered, "Our Master is a man of pleasant manners, and of probity, courteous, moderate, and unassuming: it is by his being such that he arrives at the facts.

"In the 'Book of the Odes,'" Tsz-kung went on to say, "we read of one Polished, as by the knife and file, The graving-tool, the smoothing-stone.

If there be no reverential feeling in the matter, what is there to distinguish between the cases?" To a like question of Tsz-hia, he replied: "The manner is the difficulty.

" To the disciple Tsz-lu the Master said, "Shall I give you a lesson about knowledge?

Tsz-chang was studying with an eye to official income.

Tsz-hiá once inquired what inference might be drawn from the lines "Dimples playing in witching smile, Beautiful eyes, so dark, so bright!

An observation of Tsz-yu: "Officiousness, in the service of princes, leads to disgrace: among friends, to estrangement.

Of Tsz-tsien, a disciple, he remarked, "A superior man indeed is the like of him!

Tsz-kung asked, "What of me, then?"

"If I were to take a raft, and drift about on the sea, would Tsz-lu, I wonder, be my follower there?"

In reply to a question put to him by Mang Wu respecting Tsz-luas to whether he might be called good-natured towards others, the Master said, "I cannot tell"; but, on the question being put again, he answered, "

Tsz-kung asked how it was that Kung Wan had come to be so styled Wan (the talented).

Also of hiding resentment felt towards an opponent and treating him as a friendof this kind of thing he was ashamed, and so too am I." Attended once by the two disciples Yen Yuen and Tsz-lu, he said, "Come now, why not tell me, each of you, what in your hearts you are really after?"

"I should like," said Tsz-lu, "for myself and my friends and associates, carriages and horses, and to be clad in light furs!

Tsz-lu then said, "I should like, sir, to hear what your heart is set upon."

While Tsz-hwa, a disciple, was away on a mission to Ts'i, the disciple Yen Yu, on behalf of his mother, applied for some grain.

The Master said, "When Tsz-hwa went on that journey to Ts'i, he had well-fed steeds yoked to his carriage, and was arrayed in light furs.

" When asked by Ki K'ang whether Tsz-lu was fit to serve the government, the Master replied, "Tsz-lu is a man of decision: what should prevent him from serving the government?" Asked the same question respecting Tsz-kung and Yen Yu he answered similarly, pronouncing Tsz-kung to be a man of perspicacity, and Yen Yu to be one versed in the polite arts.

" When asked by Ki K'ang whether Tsz-lu was fit to serve the government, the Master replied, "Tsz-lu is a man of decision: what should prevent him from serving the government?" Asked the same question respecting Tsz-kung and Yen Yu he answered similarly, pronouncing Tsz-kung to be a man of perspicacity, and Yen Yu to be one versed in the polite arts.

Addressing Tsz-hiá, the Master said, "Let your scholarship be that of gentlemen, and not like that of common men."

When Tsz-yu became governor of Wu-shing, the Master said to him, "Do you find good men about you?"

Once when the Master had had an interview with Nan-tsz, which had scandalized his disciple Tsz-lu, he uttered the solemn adjuration, "If I have done aught amiss, may Heaven reject me!

Tsz-kung said, "Suppose the case of one who confers benefits far and wide upon the people, and who can, in so doing, make his bounty universally felthow would you speak of him?

Tsz-lu, hearing the remark said, "But if, sir, you had the handling of the army of one of the greater States, whom would you have associated with you in that case?"

"Ah yes!" said Tsz-kung, "I will go and ask him that."

Once when the Master was seriously ill, Tsz-lu requested to be allowed to say prayers for him.

"One who standsclad in hempen robe, the worse for wearamong others clad in furs of fox and badger, and yet unabashed'tis Tsz-lu, that, is it not?"

Tsz-lu used always to be humming over the lines "From envy and enmity free, What deed doth he other than good?" "How should such a rule of life," asked the Master, "be sufficient to make any one good?"

After Tsz-lu had got it prepared, he smelt it thrice, and then rose up from his seat.

Tsz-lu propounded a question about ministering to the spirits of the departed.

The disciple Min was by his side, looking affable and bland; Tsz-lu also, looking careless and intrepid; and Yen Yu and Tsz-kung, firm and precise.

The disciple Min was by his side, looking affable and bland; Tsz-lu also, looking careless and intrepid; and Yen Yu and Tsz-kung, firm and precise.

"One like Tsz-lu there," said he, "does not come to a natural end."

Tsz-kung asked which was the worthier of the twoTsz-chang or Tsz-hiá.

Characteristics of four disciples:Tsz-káu was simple-minded; Tsang Si, a dullard; Tsz-chang, full of airs; Tsz-lu, rough.

Characteristics of four disciples:Tsz-káu was simple-minded; Tsang Si, a dullard; Tsz-chang, full of airs; Tsz-lu, rough.

Characteristics of four disciples:Tsz-káu was simple-minded; Tsang Si, a dullard; Tsz-chang, full of airs; Tsz-lu, rough.

Tsz-kung does not submit to the appointments of Heaven; and yet his goods are increased;he is often successful in his calculations."

Tsz-chang wanted to know some marks of the naturally Good Man.

"How should I dare to die," said he, "while you, sir, still lived?" On Ki Tsz-jen putting to him a question anent Tsz-lu and Yen Yu, as to whether they might be called "great ministers," the Master answered, "I had expected your question, sir, to be about something extraordinary, and lo!

"How should I dare to die," said he, "while you, sir, still lived?" On Ki Tsz-jen putting to him a question anent Tsz-lu and Yen Yu, as to whether they might be called "great ministers," the Master answered, "I had expected your question, sir, to be about something extraordinary, and lo!

Through the intervention of Tsz-lu, Tsz-kau was being appointed governor of Pi.

Through the intervention of Tsz-lu, Tsz-kau was being appointed governor of Pi.

[Footnote 26: The men of virtuous life were Yen Yuen (Hwúi), Min Tsz-k'ien, Yen Pihniu, and Chung-kung (Yen Yung); the speakers and debaters were Tsai Wo and Tsz-kung; the (capable) government servants were Yen Yu and Tsz-lu; the literary students, Tsz-yu and Tsz-hiá.]

[Footnote 26: The men of virtuous life were Yen Yuen (Hwúi), Min Tsz-k'ien, Yen Pihniu, and Chung-kung (Yen Yung); the speakers and debaters were Tsai Wo and Tsz-kung; the (capable) government servants were Yen Yu and Tsz-lu; the literary students, Tsz-yu and Tsz-hiá.]

[Footnote 26: The men of virtuous life were Yen Yuen (Hwúi), Min Tsz-k'ien, Yen Pihniu, and Chung-kung (Yen Yung); the speakers and debaters were Tsai Wo and Tsz-kung; the (capable) government servants were Yen Yu and Tsz-lu; the literary students, Tsz-yu and Tsz-hiá.]

Tsz-hiá said to him, "I have heard this: 'Death and life have destined times; wealth and honors rest with Heaven.

" Kih Tsz-shing once said, "Give me the inborn qualities of a gentleman, and I want no more.

How are such to come from book-learning?" Tsz-kung exclaimed, "Ah!

Tsz-lu never let a night pass between promise and performance.

Tsz-chang having raised some question about government, the Master said to him, "In the settlement of its principles be unwearied; in its administrationsee to that loyally."

Tsz-chang asked how otherwise he would describe the learned official who might be termed influential.

" Fan Ch'i left him, and meeting with Tsz-hiá he said, "I had an interview just now with the Master, and I asked him what wisdom was.

"As to those of whom you are uncertain, will others omit to notice them?" Tsz-lu said to the Master, "As the prince of Wei, sir, has been waiting for you to act for him in his government, what is it your intention to take in hand first?" "One thing of necessity," he answered"the rectification of terms."

"That!" exclaimed Tsz-lu.

Why such rectification?" "What a rustic you are, Tsz-lu!" rejoined the Master.

When Tsz-hiá became governor of -fu, and consulted him about government, he answered, "Do not wish for speedy results.

Tsz-lu asked how he would characterize one who might fitly be called an educated gentleman.

Asked what he thought of Tsz-si, he exclaimed, "Alas for him!

Tsz-lu asked how he would describe a perfect man.

Tsz-lu remarked, "When Duke Hwan caused his brother Kiu to be put to death, Shau Hwuh committed suicide, but Kwan Chung did not.

" Tsz-kung then spoke up.

" Whenever Tsz-kung drew comparisons from others, the Master would say, "Ah, how wise and great you must have become!

"Sir," said Tsz-kung, "how comes it to pass that no one knows you?" "While I murmur not against Heaven," continued the Master, "nor cavil at men; while I stoop to learn and aspire to penetrate into things that are high; yet 'tis Heaven alone knows what I am."

Liáu, a kinsman of the duke, having laid a complaint against Tsz-lu before Ki K'ang, an officer came to Confucius to inform him of the fact, and he added, "My lord is certainly having his mind poisoned by his kinsman Liáu, but through my influence perhaps we may yet manage to see him exposed in the marketplace or the Court."

Tsz-lu, having lodged overnight in Shih-mun, was accosted by the gate-keeper in the morning.

Tsz-lu having asked what made a "superior man," he answered, "Self-culture, with a view to becoming seriously-minded."

Tsz-lu, with indignation pictured on his countenance, exclaimed, "And is a gentleman to suffer starvation?" "A gentleman," replied the Master, "will endure it unmoved, but a common person breaks out into excesses under it."

Addressing Tsz-kung, the Master said, "You regard me as one who studies and stores up in his mind a multiplicity of thingsdo you not?""I do," he replied; "is it not so?""Not at all.

Tsz-kung asked how to become philanthropic.

" Tsz-k'in turned away, and in great glee exclaimed, "I asked one thing, and have got three.

His face beamed with pleasure, and he said laughingly, "To kill a cockwhy use an ox-knife?" Tsz-yu, the governor, replied, "In former days, sir, I heard you say, 'Let the superior man learn right principles, and he will be loving to other men; let the ordinary person learn right principles, and he will be easily managed.'

Tsz-lu was averse to this, and said, "You can never go, that is certain; how should you feel you must go to that person?"

And if it should happen that my services were enlisted, I might create for him another East Chowdon't you think so?" Tsz-chang asked Confucius about the virtue of philanthropy.

"Does a gentleman," asked Tsz-lu, "make much account of bravery?" "Righteousness he counts higher," said the Master.

" Tsz-kung asked, "I suppose a gentleman will have his aversions as well as his likings?" "Yes," replied the Master, "he will dislike those who talk much about other people's ill-deeds.

"And you, too, Tsz-kung," he continued, "have your aversions, have you not?" "I dislike," said he, "those plagiarists who wish to pass for wise persons.

Confucius was passing by them, and sent Tsz-lu to ask where the ford was.

Ch'ang-tsü said, "Who is the person driving the carriage?" "Confucius," answered Tsz-lu.

Tsz-lu inquired of him, "Have you seen my Master, sir?"

Tsz-lu brought his hands together on his breast and stood still.

The old man kept Tsz-lu and lodged him for the night, killed a fowl and prepared some millet, entertained him, and brought his two sons out to see him.

On the morrow Tsz-lu went on his way, and told all this to the Master, who said, "He is a recluse," and sent Tsz-lu back to see him again.

On the morrow Tsz-lu went on his way, and told all this to the Master, who said, "He is a recluse," and sent Tsz-lu back to see him again.

Tsz-hiá's disciples asked Tsz-chang his views about intercourse with others.

Tsz-hiá's disciples asked Tsz-chang his views about intercourse with others.

"He says," they replied, "'Associate with those who are qualified, and repel from you such as are not,'" Tsz-chang then said, "That is different from what I have learnt.

Sayings of Tsz-hiá: "Even in inferior pursuits there must be something worthy of contemplation, but if carried to an extreme there is danger of fanaticism; hence the superior man does not engage in them.

Tsz-kung once observed, "We speak of 'the iniquity of Cháu'but 'twas not so great as this.

Kung-sun Ch'an of Wei inquired of Tsz-kung how Confucius acquired his learning.

Tsz-kung replied, "The teachings of Wan and Wu have not yet fallen to the ground.

And moreover what permanent preceptor could he have?" Shuh-sun Wu-shuh, addressing the high officials at the Court, remarked that Tsz-kung was a greater worthy than Confucius.

Tsz-fuh King-pih went and informed Tsz-kung of this remark.

Tsz-fuh King-pih went and informed Tsz-kung of this remark.

Tsz-kung said, "Take by way of comparison the walls outside our houses.

"No use doing that," said Tsz-kung; "he is irreproachable.

Tsz-k'in, addressing Tsz-kung, said, "You depreciate yourself.

Tsz-k'in, addressing Tsz-kung, said, "You depreciate yourself.

Tsz-kung replied, "In the use of words one ought never to be incautious; because a gentleman for one single utterance of his is apt to be considered a wise man, and for a single utterance may be accounted unwise.