Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
650 examples of  ver  in sentences

650 examples of ver in sentences

" Proverbs, chap, xxviii, ver.

" "It is so, señora," he said solemnly, "I go to the Marionette, I work, I eat meatpiefrijolesgood, ver' good.

All time I work at mine I eat, good, ver' good grub.

" "Shakspere is ver-ry uneven," remarked Mrs. Judge Robinson, in a tone of dignified concession.

[Ver. 137.A stately place Exeter House, the residence first of the Earl of Leicester, and afterwards of Essex.

[Ver. 147.Whose dreadfull name, &c.

"The poor shall not always be forgotten, the patient abiding of the meek shall not perish for ever," Psal. x. 18. ver.

Pity, however, that our Barrister has not shown us how this plain and obvious business of Baptism agrees with ver.

Ver-r-y pr-r-etty it will look!" Cordelia Running Bird smiled prospectively, displaying small white teeth and two round dimples.

"Ver-ry hor-r-i-d pictures of the ugly issue shoes.

" "Dat is fat vill do ver' vell," said Henri; "vill you please donnez me one petit morsel of steak.

" "He have been ver' seeck.

| | in ver.

1. 51, ver. 13, from memory) a long quotation from Daniel, Dan.

in | | | ver.

iii (with the exception of ver. 1), containing the baptism of our Lord, the preaching of St. John, and the genealogy.

ver that part of it on which the head of the deceased lay.

Zey is ver' good men, sans doute, an' zey know how make ze money; maisgros matérialistes, I tell you, Sare!

He ees wan ver' great man.

Sometam' dat ole man ver' queek.

Sometam' he ver' slow.

One day Injun mak' heem ver' mad; he let heem go, and shot dat Injun right off.

Ole man he mak' heem go ver' far off, mos' to Whale Reever.

Does Injun is step ver' sof' an' go on bunk of Pierre Cadotte.

(See Hymns Ancient and Modern, No. 253, ver. 2, 3.) ANGER ...

But Tom" turning to the colored boy, "Make it very light; ver-r-ry light.

Doth the eagle mount up at thy command, and make her nest on high?"Ib., ver.

"Other men's sins."Ib., ver.

"For ten's sake."Ib., ver. 32.

Chap, xxi, ver.

"Art thou a king then?"Ib., ver. 37.

"What is truth?"Ib., ver. 38.

So in his Spelling-Book, where words are often falsely divided: as, " nice," for Ven'-ice; " no ver," for Han'o-ver; &c.See p. 101.

So in his Spelling-Book, where words are often falsely divided: as, " nice," for Ven'-ice; " no ver," for Han'o-ver; &c.See p. 101.

Correction of Murray, in the division of proper names: Hel-en, Leon-ard, Phil-ip, Rob-ert, Hor-ace, Thom-as;Car-o-line, Cath-a-rine, Dan-i-el, Deb-o-rah, Dor-o-thy, Fred-er-ick, Is-a-bel, Jon-a-than, Lyd-i-a, Nich-o-las, Ol-i-ver, Sam-u-el, Sim-e-on, Sol-o-mon, Tim-o-thy, Val-en-tine;A-mer-i-ca, Bar-thol-o-mew, E-liz-a-beth, Na-than-i-el, Pe-nel-o-pe, The-oph-i-lus.

1. Correction of Webster, by Rule 1st:ca-price, e-steem, dis-e-steem, o-blige;a-zure, ma-tron, pa-tron, pha-lanx, si-ren, trai-tor, tren-cher, bar-ber, bur-nish, gar-nish, tar-nish, var-nish, mar-ket, mus-ket, pam-phlet;bra-ver-y, kna-ver-y, sla-ver-y, e-ven-ing, sce-ner-y, bri-ber-y, ni-ce-ty, chi-ca-ner-y, ma-chin-er-y, im-a-ger-y;a-sy-lum, ho-ri-zon,fin-an-cier, her-o-ism, sar-do-nyx, scur-ri-lous,co-me-di-an, pos-te-ri-or.

1. Correction of Webster, by Rule 1st:ca-price, e-steem, dis-e-steem, o-blige;a-zure, ma-tron, pa-tron, pha-lanx, si-ren, trai-tor, tren-cher, bar-ber, bur-nish, gar-nish, tar-nish, var-nish, mar-ket, mus-ket, pam-phlet;bra-ver-y, kna-ver-y, sla-ver-y, e-ven-ing, sce-ner-y, bri-ber-y, ni-ce-ty, chi-ca-ner-y, ma-chin-er-y, im-a-ger-y;a-sy-lum, ho-ri-zon,fin-an-cier, her-o-ism, sar-do-nyx, scur-ri-lous,co-me-di-an, pos-te-ri-or.

1. Correction of Webster, by Rule 1st:ca-price, e-steem, dis-e-steem, o-blige;a-zure, ma-tron, pa-tron, pha-lanx, si-ren, trai-tor, tren-cher, bar-ber, bur-nish, gar-nish, tar-nish, var-nish, mar-ket, mus-ket, pam-phlet;bra-ver-y, kna-ver-y, sla-ver-y, e-ven-ing, sce-ner-y, bri-ber-y, ni-ce-ty, chi-ca-ner-y, ma-chin-er-y, im-a-ger-y;a-sy-lum, ho-ri-zon,fin-an-cier, her-o-ism, sar-do-nyx, scur-ri-lous,co-me-di-an, pos-te-ri-or.

Are the words to be divided thus, ri-ver, fe-ver? or thus, riv-er, fev-er?"Fowler's E. Gram., 1850, §85; Latham's Hand-Book, p. 95.

Are the words to be divided thus, ri-ver, fe-ver? or thus, riv-er, fev-er?"Fowler's E. Gram., 1850, §85; Latham's Hand-Book, p. 95.

Now I suppose it plain, that, by the rule given above, fever is to be divided in the former way, and river in the latter; thus, fe-ver, riv-er.

VER, m., petit animal rampant.

by Frank Ver Beck.

SEE Ver Beck, Frank.

VER BECK, FRANK.

The Little Black Sambo story book, by Helen Bannerman and Frank Ver Beck.

SEE Ver Beck, Frank.

dan. SEE Ver Beck, Frank.

LEAVITT, STURGIS E. Vamos a ver, by Sturgis E. Leavitt & Sterling A. Stoudemire.

by Frank Ver Beck.

<pb id='381.png' /> VER BECK, FRANK.

The gar-ret was ver-y large; and their mam-ma could hear them as they tramped a-long, and could hear Tom's com-mand to right a-bout face when they had reached the farth-er end.

Then, out of an old box, they dragged a scrap-book full of pic-tures, and sat them down to look them o-ver.

Bell was most at fault, but now she is ver-y sor-ry for what she has done.

So she kiss-es her sis-ter, and the trou-ble is all o-ver. OLD WINTER.

The ver-y next day their mam-ma did take them.

They found Ruth sit-ting pil-lowed up in a chair, ver-y pale and white.

Bell had picked her a bunch of flow-ers, which she seemed ver-y glad to get; and the three girls soon be-came good friends.

Mittheil des Ver.

'Frigora mitescunt Zephyris, Ver proterit Æstas Interitura, simul Pomifer Autumnus fruges effuderit, et mox Bruma recurrit iners.' Hor.

Il court Près de lui le ramier est lent, le flocon lourd; Le daim, l'épervier, la panthère Sont encor , qu'au loin son ombre a déjà fui; Et la locomotive est reptile, et, sous lui, L'hydre de flamme est ver de terre.

Si l'on pouvait rouvrir les yeux que le ver ronge, Oh! ce vaisseau, construit par le chiffre et le songe, Éblouirait Shakspeare

Pleurez sur l'araignée immonde, sur le ver, Sur la limace au dos mouillé comme l'hiver, Sur le vil puceron qu'on voit aux feuilles pendre, Sur le crabe hideux, sur l'affreux scolopendre, Sur l'effrayant crapaud, pauvre monstre

"Ver' good take s'much trouble.

" "Ver' well," he replied drowsily.

He asks, ver. 8, for something more.

We will begin where they began, ver. 1, at the Sheep Gate on the east side of the city.

We ask how this is, and we find that some in Tekoa have shirked the work (ver. 5): 'Their nobles put not their necks to the work of their Lord.

They are the daughters of Shallum, the ruler of the half part of Jerusalem (ver. 12) (or rather of the country round Jerusalem).

His son Hattush had returned with Ezra, twelve years before; now here is the old man himself, determined not to let his white hairs prevent him from helping on the good work (ver 29).

' Ver. 10: 'And Judah said, The strength of the bearers of burdens is decayed, and there is much rubbish; so that we are not able to build the wall.' (2) News was brought in from all sides, that any day, any night, at any moment, a sudden attack might be expected, for their enemies were boasting loudly to all they met that they were confident of taking the builders by surprise.

Ten times over Nehemiah received deputations of this kind (ver. 12); and the spirits of the builders sank lower and lower.

"But by the body of Christ believers are become dead to the law," ver.

"The old man being crucified with Christ, that the body of sin might be destroyed, the believer is not any more to serve sin," Rom. vi. 6; "and being now dead, they are freed from sin," ver. 7; "and are married to another, even to him who is raised from the dead, and so they should not serve sin, but bring forth fruit unto God," Rom. vii.

12; "they are to mortify the deeds of the body through the spirit," ver.

8, "Make me to hear joy and gladness;" and ver.

and which it is God's prerogative alone to search and try, ver. 10.

for it made him to stagger, so that his feet were almost gone, and his steps had well nigh slipt; yea he was almost repenting of his being a godly person, saying, ver. 13, "Verily I have cleansed my heart in vain, and washed my hands in innocency."

The harvest was past, and the summer was ended, and yet they were not saved, ver. 20; and they looked for peace, but no good came, and for a time of health, but behold trouble, ver.

The harvest was past, and the summer was ended, and yet they were not saved, ver. 20; and they looked for peace, but no good came, and for a time of health, but behold trouble, ver.

24, 25, yet was content to learn of Aquila, and of his wife Priscilla, when they expounded unto him the way of God more perfectly, ver. 26.

The wrath of God lay hard upon him, and he said, that he was afflicted with all God's waves, ver.

And yet for all this, the first word of his complaint was faith, ver.

That man might be his everlasting debtor, and cast down, in testimony thereof, his crown at his feet, "who sitteth on the throne," as those did, Rev. iv. 10, and might cry out with these same elders, ver.

[Footnote 1: In another criticism of this play Larra writes: 'y con no ver en este amorío los terribles inconvenientes que en los de sus novelas está acostumbrada a encontrar....']

Qué tengo yo que ver con el aguador ni con su esportilla? BRUNO. ¿

Buenos días, Sr. D. Eduardo, muy buenos días ¡y qué temprano tenemos el gusto de ver a usted en esta su casa!

Tanto mejor, amigo mío, y ahora vamos a ver, porque, con el permiso de usted, la haré llamar; en presencia de usted consultaremos su gusto y su voluntad.

y ... conque, Sr. D. Eduardo, a la disposición de usted ... bueno será que yo vaya a ver lo que hace la chica; y no dude usted que si puedo influir.... DON EDUARDO.

Por Dios Sr. D. Pedro, que no logre yo el ver a usted...." ¡Ah, conque es un proyecto!...

lo único que solicito es ver todavía otra vez a doña Matilde ...

no te vuelva a ver en mi vida....

¡Que me case y que no le vuelva a ver en su vida!...

y que quizá no volveré a ver más ...

dame la mano, Bruno ... adiós, Bruno ... que seas feliz ... que me vengas a ver ... ¡ay, que me caigo!... BRUNO.

They go to bed early; they are up at daylight; they have the horse; they have boats; they amuse themselves ver' much.

You cannot ride the horse now," said she, feeling my brow; "maybe not for a ver' long time.

"It will make you ver' sick.

Send down Thy lev-er or lee-ver, according to Webster's or Worcester's dictionary, whichever Thou usest, and pry them into activity.

'C'est une maladie de l'âme,' she says, 'dont nous afflige la nature en nous donnant l'existence; c'est le ver solitaire qui absorbe tout.'