Inspirassion

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401225 examples of  we  in sentences

401225 examples of we in sentences

We are never jarred in them, as we are in all the attempts at ballad-writing and ballad-restoring before Mr. Tennyson's time, by discordant touches of the reflective in thought, the picturesque in Nature, or the theatric in action.

We are never jarred in them, as we are in all the attempts at ballad-writing and ballad-restoring before Mr. Tennyson's time, by discordant touches of the reflective in thought, the picturesque in Nature, or the theatric in action.

The bishop confesses, if we mistake not, to have patched one end of the ballad.

" In the original, we hear how the elfin harper could Harp fish out of the water, And water out of a stone, And milk out of a maiden's breast That bairn had never none.

And in "Locksley Hall" and the "'Two Voices" we find the new doubts and questions of the time embodied naturally and organically, in his own method of simple natural expression.

In saying that "Locksley Hall" has deservedly had so great an influence over the minds of the young, we shall, we are afraid, have offended some who are accustomed to consider that poem as Werterian and unhealthy.

In saying that "Locksley Hall" has deservedly had so great an influence over the minds of the young, we shall, we are afraid, have offended some who are accustomed to consider that poem as Werterian and unhealthy.

We are not attacking the reviewer, far less the "Edinburgh Review," which some years after this not only made the amende honorable to Burns, but showed a frank impartiality only too rare in the reviews of these days, by publishing in its pages the noble article on Burns which has since appeared separately in Mr. Carlyle's "Miscellanies.

" We only wish to show, from the reviewer's own words, the element in which Burns had to work, the judges before whom he had to plead, and the change which, as we think, very much by the influence of his own poems, has passed upon the minds of men.

" We only wish to show, from the reviewer's own words, the element in which Burns had to work, the judges before whom he had to plead, and the change which, as we think, very much by the influence of his own poems, has passed upon the minds of men.

A fellow-feeling with the French Revolution, in the mind of a young man of that day, was a sign of moral health, which we should have been sorry to miss in him.

We are not what we were, but better, or rather, with boundless means of being better if we will.

We are not what we were, but better, or rather, with boundless means of being better if we will.

We are not what we were, but better, or rather, with boundless means of being better if we will.

We have entered a fresh era of time for good and evil; the fact is patent in every sermon we hear, in every book we read, in every invention, even the most paltry, which we see registered.

We have entered a fresh era of time for good and evil; the fact is patent in every sermon we hear, in every book we read, in every invention, even the most paltry, which we see registered.

We have entered a fresh era of time for good and evil; the fact is patent in every sermon we hear, in every book we read, in every invention, even the most paltry, which we see registered.

We have entered a fresh era of time for good and evil; the fact is patent in every sermon we hear, in every book we read, in every invention, even the most paltry, which we see registered.

Shall we think hardly of the man who saw the dawn of our own day, and welcomed it cheerfully and hopefully, even though he fancied the mist-spectres to be elements of the true sunrise, and knew notand who knows?the purposes of Him whose paths are in the great deep, and His ways past finding out?

The new and more complex era into which we are passing has not yet sufficiently opened itself to be sung about; men hardly know what it is, much less what it will be; and while they are hard at work creating it, they have no breath to spare in talking of it.

The true test, we say again, of a song.

We question whether in all Mr. Whitelaw's collection there is a single modern poem (placing Burns as the transition point between the old and new) which rises so high, or pierces so deep, with all its pastoral simplicity, as Smibert's "Widow's Lament.

Like all Burns's successors, including even Walter Scott and Hogg, we have but to compare him with his original to see how altogether unrivalled on his own ground the Ayrshire farmer was.

If one prejudice is overthrown, one error rendered untenable; if but one step in advance be the consequence of your articles and minethe consequences of the labour of all true menare we not deeply repaid?

The nervous simplicity of the man come out, in the very nervous simplicity of the prose he writes; and though there be nothing very new or elevated in it, or indeed in his poems themselves, we call on our readers to admire a phenomenon so rare, in the "upper classes" at least, in these days, and taking a lesson from the peasant's son, rejoice with us that "a man is born into the world.

It seems to him, once on a time, right and necessary that Sir William Molesworth should be returned for Leeds; and Nicoll having so determined, "throws himself, body and soul, into the contest, with such ardour, that his wife afterwards said (and we can well believe it) that if Sir William had failed, Robert would have died on the instant!"why not?

By what hours of misery and blank despair that faith was purchased, we can only guess; the simple strong men give us the result, but never dream of sitting down and analysing the process for the world's amusement or their own glorification.

We question, indeed, whether they could have told us; whether the mere fact of a man's being able to dissect himself, in public or in private, is not proof-patent that he is no man, but only a shell of a man, with works inside, which can of course be exhibited and taken to piecesa rather more difficult matter with flesh and blood.

Here we have an example.

We are told that on one occasion his subjects urged upon him the propriety of marriage, and to their importunities he returned the dark answer that, Yes, he had determined to take a wife; but that it would be when the oak tree shall cast chestnuts, when the sun shall rise in the west, when one can cross the sea dry-shod, and when nightingales grow beards.

We have no Sahagun to report to us the traditions and prayers of this strange people.

From these, however, it is possible to piece together enough to give us a glimpse of their original form, and we shall find it not unlike those we have already reviewed.

From these, however, it is possible to piece together enough to give us a glimpse of their original form, and we shall find it not unlike those we have already reviewed.

Figuratively, in these dialects it meant subsistence, life, as we use in both these senses the word "vitals."

Among the Kiches of Guatemala, a tribe of Maya stock, we find, as terms applied to their highest divinity, u pam uleu, u pam cah, literally Belly of the Earth, Belly of the Sky, meaning that by which earth and sky exist.

That the circular temple in Mayapan, with four doors, specified by Landa as different from any other in Yucatan, was erected to Quetzalcoatl, by or because of the Aztec colony there, may plausibly be supposed when we recall how peculiarly this form was devoted to his worship.

Of this we are informed by Landa, in an interesting passage.

None of the American nations seems to have been more given than they to prognostics and prophecies, and of none other have we so large an amount of this kind of literature remaining.

Like the glittering hoard which we read of in the lay of the Nibelung, the treasure brought with it the destruction of its owner, for his brothers, envious of the wondrous pile, persuaded Ayar Cachi to enter the cave where he kept his hoard, in order to bring out a certain vase, and also to pray to their father, the Sun, to aid them to rule their domains.

We left him sailing on his outspread mantle, into the light of the morning, over Lake Carapace.

We may well believe he did; for the light of day, which is quenched in the western ocean, passes back again, by the straits or in some other way, and appears again the next morning, not in the West, where we watched its dying rays, but in the East, where again it is born to pursue its daily and ever recurring journey.

We may well believe he did; for the light of day, which is quenched in the western ocean, passes back again, by the straits or in some other way, and appears again the next morning, not in the West, where we watched its dying rays, but in the East, where again it is born to pursue its daily and ever recurring journey.

Did it depend on legend alone we might, however strong the consensus of testimony, harbor some doubt about it.

From it and other sources we learn that he was one of the twins supposed to have been born of a virgin mother in Utatlan, the central province of the Kiches, to have been the guide and protector of their nation, and in its interest to have made a journey to the Underworld, in order to revenge himself on his powerful enemies, its rulers.

We are not well acquainted with the Votan myth.

] All these traits of this popular hero are too exactly similar to those of the other representatives of this myth, for them to leave any doubt as to what we are to make of Votan.

[Footnote 2: Thus we have (Popol Vuh, Part i, p. 2) u qux cho, Heart of the Lakes, and u qux palo, Heart of the Ocean, as names of the highest divinity; later, we find u qux cah, Heart of the Sky (p. 8), u qux uleu, Heart of the Earth, p. 12, 14, etc.

[Footnote 2: Thus we have (Popol Vuh, Part i, p. 2) u qux cho, Heart of the Lakes, and u qux palo, Heart of the Ocean, as names of the highest divinity; later, we find u qux cah, Heart of the Sky (p. 8), u qux uleu, Heart of the Earth, p. 12, 14, etc.

"The matters that Bochica taught," says the chronicler Piedrahita, "were certainly excellent, inasmuch as these natives hold as right to do just the same that we do."

That it did so we have ample evidence in the authentic accounts of the ancient society as it existed before the Europeans destroyed and corrupted it, and in the collections of laws, all distinctly stamped with the seal of religion, which have been preserved, as they were in vogue in Anahuac, Utatlan, Peru and other localities.

We may believe, as Mrs. Thrale remarks upon his jumping over a stool to show that he was not tired by his hunting, that his performances in this kind were so strange and uncouth that a fear for the safety of his bones quenched the spectator's tendency to laugh.

Sir, he said fondly of his college, "we are a nest of singing-birds."

Most of the strains are now pretty well forgotten, and some of them must at all times have been such as we scarcely associate with the nightingale.

Her praises were, we may believe, sweeter to him than those of the severest critics, or the most fervent of personal flatterers.

We must proceed, however, to a more serious event.

I only wish we could empty the hotel and fill every bed with our poor wounded!

There is no saying where we shall end up, if this weather holds.

To my delight she had one other left, though near the end, and we were actually dancing when an excitable person came out of the card-room, flushed with liquor and losses, and carried her off in the most preposterous manner.

"It's what we were speaking about last night!" burst out Bob.

As I lift myself up, I see others lift themselves up on those straw bags we kindly call our mattresses.

We are all presently on our pins,K. on those lengthy continuations of his, and the two stout gentlemen on their stout supporters.

We move as one man.

We have failed to put ourselvesheads, arms, legs, and willstogether as a unit for any purpose so thoroughly as to snuff out a similar unit.

Just a month ago, "in such a night as this," we made our first promenade through the enemy's country.

The moon of Annapolis,why should we not have our ominous moon, as those other fellows had their sun of Austerlitz?the moon of Annapolis shone over us.

So we pegged along to Washington and across Washington,which at that point consists of Willard's Hotel, few other buildings being in sight.

A hag in a nightcap reviewed us from an upper window as we tramped by.

Opposite that bald block, the Washington Monument, and opposite what was of more importance to us, a drove of beeves putting beef on their bones in the seedy grounds of the Smithsonian Institution, we were halted while the New Jersey brigadesome three thousand of themtrudged by, receiving the complimentary fire of our line as they passed.

By the time we touched ground across the bridge, dawn was breaking,a good omen for poor old sleepy Virginia.

As the morning hours passed, we learned that we were the rear-guard of the left wing of the army advancing into Virginia.

As the morning hours passed, we learned that we were the rear-guard of the left wing of the army advancing into Virginia.

When the road grew too hot for us, on account of the fire of sunshine in our rear, we jumped over the fence into the Race-Course, a big field beside us, and there became squatter sovereigns all day.

I shall be a bore, if I say again what a pretty figure we cut in this military picnic, with two long lines of blankets draped on bayonets for parasols.

In our methodical New England life, we still recognize some magic in summer.

There is this merit, at least, among the coarser crew of imported flowers, that they bring their own proper names with them, and we know precisely whom we have to deal with.

There is this merit, at least, among the coarser crew of imported flowers, that they bring their own proper names with them, and we know precisely whom we have to deal with.

In speaking of our own native flowers, we must either be careless and inaccurate, or else resort sometimes to the Latin, in spite of the indignation of friends.

The really rustic names of both plants and animals are very few with us,the different species are many; and as we come to know them better and love them more, we absolutely require some way to distinguish them from their half-sisters and second-cousins.

The really rustic names of both plants and animals are very few with us,the different species are many; and as we come to know them better and love them more, we absolutely require some way to distinguish them from their half-sisters and second-cousins.

We fall on our legs in this world, Blind kittens, tossed in neck and heels: 'Tis Dame Circumstance licks Nature's cubs into shape, She's the mill-head, if we are the wheels.

Guta, there is sense in that knave's ribaldry: We must not thus baptize our idleness, And call it resignation: Which is love?

Then your prayers Shall drive home your rebukes; for both we need you Our snares are many, and our sins are more.

I saw him just before us: let us onward; We must not seem to loiter.

Things, however, went on very wellI bowed to my best customers, and attended closely to my business while I was in it, trade went on briskly, and the only effect of this acquaintance was the necessity of letting our friends see that we were getting above the world, by selling some of our old-fashioned furniture, and replacing it with that which was more genteel, and introducing wine at dinner when we had company.

Things, however, went on very wellI bowed to my best customers, and attended closely to my business while I was in it, trade went on briskly, and the only effect of this acquaintance was the necessity of letting our friends see that we were getting above the world, by selling some of our old-fashioned furniture, and replacing it with that which was more genteel, and introducing wine at dinner when we had company.

Accordingly we removed to the distance of fifteen miles from town, into a better house, because there was a large garden adjoining it, and a field for the horse.

We would that he had so lived, if only that his sublime truths might thus nave been multiplied for the good of mankind, if not for the weak heads of St. James's Street.

We are not about to write an advertisement for this advertised of all advertisersnor to talk of its square feetits crowded broadsideor the myriads of letters that make it resemble a sea of animalculae.

We are content to leave all the pride of its machinery to Messrs. Applegath and Cowper, and the clang of its engine to the peaceful purlieus of Printing-house Square.

Thus, we start, and not unappropriately, with notices of vessels to sail for India and the new settlement on Swan River.

We have abridged the following very important and interesting information respecting the New Settlement on the Western Coast of Australia, from the last Number of the Quarterly Review.

"If you will pardon my saying it ..." "We are excellent friends," admitted Lewisham.

"But here we are at your diggings.

"We hadconsiderable difficulty.

Just because we are poorLet him dismiss you!

We are not foolsbecause we know.

We are not foolsbecause we know.

"The sooner we part the better.

from which the soul has gone To gaze in other lands," bend not upon us, living and loving mortals, that stony stare of death,lest we too, as smit with the basilisk, be turned into monumental stone, and all the dear grace and movement of life be lost forever!

We recognize ourselves in her, and find all the characteristics of our own humanity there developed into a theism so divine, clothed with a personification so exquisite and poetical, that the Hellenic mythology seems still to live in our hearts, a silent and shadowy religion without ceremonies or altars or sacrifices.