Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
Do we say   wind   or  wind

Do we say wind or wind

wind 17177 occurrences

Snow swept from the ground like dust and driven before the wind.

An irregularity formed by the wind on a snowplain.

During the night the wind increased; we worked up to 8, to 9, and to 9.5 knots.

Stiff wind from N.W. and confused sea.

Later in the day the wind has veered to the westward, heading us slightly.

From 4 o'clock last night the wind freshened with great rapidity, and very shortly we were under topsails, jib, and staysail only.

The night wore on, the sea and wind ever rising, and the ship ever plunging more distractedly; we shortened sail to main topsail and staysail, stopped engines and hove to, but to little purpose.

Saturday, December 3.Yesterday the wind slowly fell towards evening; less water was taken on board, therefore less found its way below, and it soon became evident that our baling was gaining on the engine-room.

The sea and wind seem to be increasing again, and there is a heavy southerly swell, but the glass is high; we ought not to have another gale till it falls.3 Monday, December 5.Lat.

The barometer has been almost steady since Saturday, the wind rising and falling slightly, but steady in direction from the west.

The wind failed in the morning watch and later a faint breeze came from the eastward; the barometer has been falling, but not on a steep gradient; it is still above normal.

The wind has come fair and we are on our course again, going between 7 and 8 knots.

The wind increased in the first watch last night to a moderate gale.

Topgallant sails and mainsail were furled, and later in the night the wind gradually crept ahead.

It was light throughout last night (always a cheerful condition), but this head wind is trying to the patience, more especially as our coal expenditure is more than I estimated.

Then again, what I have described as 'intrusive layers of blue ice' was a remarkable feature; one could imagine that these layers represent surfaces which have been transformed by regelation under hot sun and wind.

'Within limits the density is changing from day to day and even from hour to hour; such changes depend on the wind, but it may not necessarily be a local wind, so that at times they seem almost mysterious.

'Within limits the density is changing from day to day and even from hour to hour; such changes depend on the wind, but it may not necessarily be a local wind, so that at times they seem almost mysterious.

I expect the wind will shift soon; pressure on the pack has eased, but so far it has not opened.

The floes were not apart but barely touching the edges, which were hard pressed yesterday; the wind still holds from N.W., but lighter.

The wind has come from the S.W., force 2; we have bright sunshine and good sights.

The ship has swung to the wind and the floes around are continually moving.

We have seen enough to know that with a north-westerly or westerly wind the floes tend to pack and that they open when it is calm.

Friday, December 16.The wind sprang up from the N.E. this morning, bringing snow, thin light hail, and finally rain; it grew very thick and has remained so all day.

This morning the wind increased to force 6 from the west with snow.

At noon the barograph curve turned up and the wind moderated, the sky gradually clearing.

To-night it is fairly bright and clear; there is a light south-westerly wind.

Snow squalls have been passing at intervalsthe wind continues in the N.W.

This morning we have brilliant sunshine and no wind.

This morning there were many dark shades of open water sky to the south; the westerly wind ruffling the water makes these cloud shadows very dark.

The wind has gone from west to W.S.W. and still blows nearly force 6.

The ice has closedI trust it will open well when the wind lets up.

Wednesday, December 21.The wind was still strong this morning, but had shifted to the south-west.

The sun is now peeping through, the wind lessening and the weather conditions generally improving.

5 P.M.The wind has settled to a moderate gale from S.W.

The wind still steady from the S.W., with a clear sky and even barometer.

There is not a vestige of swell, and with the wind in this direction there certainly ought to be if the open water was reasonably close.

Friday, December 23.The wind fell light at about ten last night and the ship swung round.

This brought us dead to windward of and close to a large berg with the wind steadily increasing.

In such a scattered sea we cannot go direct, but often have to make longish detours; but on the whole in calm water and with a favouring wind we make good progress.

Current Wind 11-12 S. 48 E. 12'?

N. by W. 3 to 5 13-14 N. 20 W. 2' N.W. by W. 0-2 14-15 N. 2 E. 5.2' S.W. 1-2 15-17 apparently little current variable light 20-21 N. 32 E. 9.4 N.W. to W.S.W. 4 to 6 21-22 N. 5 E. 8.5 West 4 to 5 The above seems to show that the drift is generally with the wind.

The wind which has persisted from the west for so long fell light last night, and to-day comes from the N.E. by N., a steady breeze from 2 to 3 in force.

Since one must have hope, ours is pinned to the possible effect of a continuance of easterly wind.

All hope that this easterly wind will open the pack seems to have vanished.

The day has been overcast and the wind force 3 to 5 from the E.N.E.snow has fallen from time to time.

Somewhere well north or south of us the wind may be blowing in some other direction, tending to press up or release pressure; then again such sheets of open water as those through which we passed to the north afford space into which bodies of pack can be pushed.

The exasperating uncertainty of one's mind in such captivity is due to ignorance of its cause and inability to predict the effect of changes of wind.

The wind steadily increased and has been blowing a moderate gale, shifting in direction to E.S.E. We are reduced to lower topsails.

We were lying amongst the floes perfectly peacefully whilst the wind howled through the rigging.

Later, 6 P.M.The wind has backed from S.E. to E.S.E. and the swell is going downthis seems to argue open water in the first but not in the second direction and that the course we pursue is a good one on the whole.

The sky is clearing but the wind still gusty, force 4 to 7; the ice has frozen a little and we've made no progress since noon.

The wind lulled in the middle watch and has fallen to force 2 to 3.

The sky is overcast: stratus clouds come over from the N.N.E. with wind in the same direction soon after we started.

The wind remains in the north helping us, the sky is overcast and slight sleety drizzle is falling; the sun has made one or two attempts to break through but without success.

The barometer fell on a very steep gradient and the wind increased to force 6 from the E.N.E. In the evening the snow fell heavily and the glass still galloped down.

But here by experience we know that the barometer gives little indication of wind.

At the end of the first watch we were passing through occasional streams of ice; the wind had shifted to north and the barometer had ceased to fall.

The wind blew strong from the west and from the east; the sky was often darkly overcast; we had snowstorms, flaky snow, and even light rain.

In the morning watch the wind and sea increased and the outlook was very distressing, but at six ice was sighted ahead.

The sea is damped down to a gentle swell, although the wind is as strong as ever.

The wind which started south yesterday has gone to S.S.W. (true), the main swell in from S.E. by S. or S.S.E. There seems to be another from south but none from the direction from which the wind is now blowing.

The wind which started south yesterday has gone to S.S.W. (true), the main swell in from S.E. by S. or S.S.E. There seems to be another from south but none from the direction from which the wind is now blowing.

The wind has been getting squally: now the squalls are lessening in force, the sky is clearing

The wind having gone to the S.W. and fallen to force 3 as we cleared the ice, we headed into a short steep swell, and for some hours the ship pitched most uncomfortably.

Soon after 8 A.M. the sky cleared, and we have had brilliant sunshine throughout the day; the wind came from the N.W. this forenoon, but has dropped during the afternoon.

There is still a good deal of swelldifficult to understand after a day's calmand less than 200 miles of water to wind-ward.

At 8.30 we sighted Mount Erebus, distant about 115 miles; the sky is covered with light cumulus and an easterly wind has sprung up, force 2 to 3.

Bowers went back again with Meares and managed to ferry over some wind clothes and odds and ends.

We had a keen north wind to-night and a haze, but wind is dropping and sun shining brightly again.

We had a keen north wind to-night and a haze, but wind is dropping and sun shining brightly again.

The weather has been very warm and fine on the whole, with occasional gleams of sunshine, but to-night there is a rather chill wind from the south.

We had a strongish northerly breeze at midday with snow and hail storms, and now the wind has turned to the south and the sky is overcast with threatenings of a blizzard.

The wind increased to force six or seven at the ship, and continued to blow, with drift, throughout the forenoon.

It is a first-rate building in an extraordinarily sheltered spot; whilst the wind was raging at the ship this morning we enjoyed comparative peace.

The wind began to drop at midday, and after lunch I went to the ship.

To-night the wind has dropped altogether and we return to the glorious conditions of a week ago.

Thursday, January 12.Bright sun again all day, but in the afternoon a chill wind from the S.S.W. Again we are reminded of the shelter afforded by our position; to-night the anemometers on Observatory Hill show a 20-mile winddown in our valley we only have mild puffs.

The wind was strong from the S.S.E. yesterday morning, sweeping over the camp; the temperature fell to 15ยฐ, the sky became overcast.

The wind is very persistent from the S.S.E., rising and falling; to-night it has sprung up again, and is rattling the canvas of the tent.

The morning promised well and the day fulfilled the promise: we had bright sunshine and practically no wind.

Towards the Glacier Tongue there were some heaps of snow much wind blown.

Shackleton reported that the door had been forced by the wind, but that he had made an entrance by the window and found shelter insideother members of his party used it for shelter.

The ponies don't like the wind, but they are all standing the cold wonderfully and all their sores are healed up.

Later in the forenoon the wind dropped and the sun shone forth.

Rather significant of a blizzard if we had not had such a lot of wind lately.

The wind has been boisterous all day, to advantage after the last snow fall, as it has been drifting the loose snow along and hardening the surfaces.

First the felt boots and felt slippers made by Jaeger and then summer wind clothes and fur mitsnothing could be better than these articles.

I have an idea to use putties to secure our wind trousers to the finnesko.

The wind has turned to the north to-night and is blowing quite fresh.

Fearing a little trouble I went out of the hut in the middle of the night and saw at once that she was having a bad timethe ice was breaking with a northerly swell and the wind increasing, with the ship on dead lee shore; luckily the ice anchors had been put well in on the floe and some still held.

In the afternoon the ship returned to the northern ice edge; the wind was still strong (about N. 30 W.) and loose ice all along the edgeour people went out with the ice anchors and I saw the ship pass west again.

The wind dropped as she came off, and she is now securely moored off the northern ice edge, where I hope the greater number of her people are finding rest.

In conclusion, allow me to remark that the results of my investigation, of which but a succinct account has been given here, negative certain derivations, which have been believed in, though they have never been proved; such as that of the form I have last discussed from the Assyrian palmetta, or from a cypress bent down by the wind.

The tarantass (Fig. 22), drawn by three nimble horses, flies through the endless deserts with wind-like rapidity.

The matted dounga looked as though it might be chilly, particularly if a strong wind came to play among the rather draughty-looking mats which were all that our poor friend had between her and a cold world!

" Living much out of doors, in the sun and wind, will no doubt produce a certain roughness of character,will cause a thicker cuticle to grow over some of the finer qualities of our nature, as on the face and hands, or as severe manual labor robs the hands of some of their delicacy of touch.

Perhaps we should be more susceptible to some influences important to our intellectual and moral growth, if the sun had shone and the wind blown on us a little less; and no doubt it is a nice matter to proportion rightly the thick and thin skin.

And constantly the boat drew nearer, as I said; they were almost within hail; Dan saw her hair streaming on the wind; he waited only for the long wave.

So the days went in cloud and wind.

wind 17177 occurrences

Snow swept from the ground like dust and driven before the wind.

An irregularity formed by the wind on a snowplain.

During the night the wind increased; we worked up to 8, to 9, and to 9.5 knots.

Stiff wind from N.W. and confused sea.

Later in the day the wind has veered to the westward, heading us slightly.

From 4 o'clock last night the wind freshened with great rapidity, and very shortly we were under topsails, jib, and staysail only.

The night wore on, the sea and wind ever rising, and the ship ever plunging more distractedly; we shortened sail to main topsail and staysail, stopped engines and hove to, but to little purpose.

Saturday, December 3.Yesterday the wind slowly fell towards evening; less water was taken on board, therefore less found its way below, and it soon became evident that our baling was gaining on the engine-room.

The sea and wind seem to be increasing again, and there is a heavy southerly swell, but the glass is high; we ought not to have another gale till it falls.3 Monday, December 5.Lat.

The barometer has been almost steady since Saturday, the wind rising and falling slightly, but steady in direction from the west.

The wind failed in the morning watch and later a faint breeze came from the eastward; the barometer has been falling, but not on a steep gradient; it is still above normal.

The wind has come fair and we are on our course again, going between 7 and 8 knots.

The wind increased in the first watch last night to a moderate gale.

Topgallant sails and mainsail were furled, and later in the night the wind gradually crept ahead.

It was light throughout last night (always a cheerful condition), but this head wind is trying to the patience, more especially as our coal expenditure is more than I estimated.

Then again, what I have described as 'intrusive layers of blue ice' was a remarkable feature; one could imagine that these layers represent surfaces which have been transformed by regelation under hot sun and wind.

'Within limits the density is changing from day to day and even from hour to hour; such changes depend on the wind, but it may not necessarily be a local wind, so that at times they seem almost mysterious.

'Within limits the density is changing from day to day and even from hour to hour; such changes depend on the wind, but it may not necessarily be a local wind, so that at times they seem almost mysterious.

I expect the wind will shift soon; pressure on the pack has eased, but so far it has not opened.

The floes were not apart but barely touching the edges, which were hard pressed yesterday; the wind still holds from N.W., but lighter.

The wind has come from the S.W., force 2; we have bright sunshine and good sights.

The ship has swung to the wind and the floes around are continually moving.

We have seen enough to know that with a north-westerly or westerly wind the floes tend to pack and that they open when it is calm.

Friday, December 16.The wind sprang up from the N.E. this morning, bringing snow, thin light hail, and finally rain; it grew very thick and has remained so all day.

This morning the wind increased to force 6 from the west with snow.

At noon the barograph curve turned up and the wind moderated, the sky gradually clearing.

To-night it is fairly bright and clear; there is a light south-westerly wind.

Snow squalls have been passing at intervalsthe wind continues in the N.W.

This morning we have brilliant sunshine and no wind.

This morning there were many dark shades of open water sky to the south; the westerly wind ruffling the water makes these cloud shadows very dark.

The wind has gone from west to W.S.W. and still blows nearly force 6.

The ice has closedI trust it will open well when the wind lets up.

Wednesday, December 21.The wind was still strong this morning, but had shifted to the south-west.

The sun is now peeping through, the wind lessening and the weather conditions generally improving.

5 P.M.The wind has settled to a moderate gale from S.W.

The wind still steady from the S.W., with a clear sky and even barometer.

There is not a vestige of swell, and with the wind in this direction there certainly ought to be if the open water was reasonably close.

Friday, December 23.The wind fell light at about ten last night and the ship swung round.

This brought us dead to windward of and close to a large berg with the wind steadily increasing.

In such a scattered sea we cannot go direct, but often have to make longish detours; but on the whole in calm water and with a favouring wind we make good progress.

Current Wind 11-12 S. 48 E. 12'?

N. by W. 3 to 5 13-14 N. 20 W. 2' N.W. by W. 0-2 14-15 N. 2 E. 5.2' S.W. 1-2 15-17 apparently little current variable light 20-21 N. 32 E. 9.4 N.W. to W.S.W. 4 to 6 21-22 N. 5 E. 8.5 West 4 to 5 The above seems to show that the drift is generally with the wind.

The wind which has persisted from the west for so long fell light last night, and to-day comes from the N.E. by N., a steady breeze from 2 to 3 in force.

Since one must have hope, ours is pinned to the possible effect of a continuance of easterly wind.

All hope that this easterly wind will open the pack seems to have vanished.

The day has been overcast and the wind force 3 to 5 from the E.N.E.snow has fallen from time to time.

Somewhere well north or south of us the wind may be blowing in some other direction, tending to press up or release pressure; then again such sheets of open water as those through which we passed to the north afford space into which bodies of pack can be pushed.

The exasperating uncertainty of one's mind in such captivity is due to ignorance of its cause and inability to predict the effect of changes of wind.

The wind steadily increased and has been blowing a moderate gale, shifting in direction to E.S.E. We are reduced to lower topsails.

We were lying amongst the floes perfectly peacefully whilst the wind howled through the rigging.

Later, 6 P.M.The wind has backed from S.E. to E.S.E. and the swell is going downthis seems to argue open water in the first but not in the second direction and that the course we pursue is a good one on the whole.

The sky is clearing but the wind still gusty, force 4 to 7; the ice has frozen a little and we've made no progress since noon.

The wind lulled in the middle watch and has fallen to force 2 to 3.

The sky is overcast: stratus clouds come over from the N.N.E. with wind in the same direction soon after we started.

The wind remains in the north helping us, the sky is overcast and slight sleety drizzle is falling; the sun has made one or two attempts to break through but without success.

The barometer fell on a very steep gradient and the wind increased to force 6 from the E.N.E. In the evening the snow fell heavily and the glass still galloped down.

But here by experience we know that the barometer gives little indication of wind.

At the end of the first watch we were passing through occasional streams of ice; the wind had shifted to north and the barometer had ceased to fall.

The wind blew strong from the west and from the east; the sky was often darkly overcast; we had snowstorms, flaky snow, and even light rain.

In the morning watch the wind and sea increased and the outlook was very distressing, but at six ice was sighted ahead.

The sea is damped down to a gentle swell, although the wind is as strong as ever.

The wind which started south yesterday has gone to S.S.W. (true), the main swell in from S.E. by S. or S.S.E. There seems to be another from south but none from the direction from which the wind is now blowing.

The wind which started south yesterday has gone to S.S.W. (true), the main swell in from S.E. by S. or S.S.E. There seems to be another from south but none from the direction from which the wind is now blowing.

The wind has been getting squally: now the squalls are lessening in force, the sky is clearing

The wind having gone to the S.W. and fallen to force 3 as we cleared the ice, we headed into a short steep swell, and for some hours the ship pitched most uncomfortably.

Soon after 8 A.M. the sky cleared, and we have had brilliant sunshine throughout the day; the wind came from the N.W. this forenoon, but has dropped during the afternoon.

There is still a good deal of swelldifficult to understand after a day's calmand less than 200 miles of water to wind-ward.

At 8.30 we sighted Mount Erebus, distant about 115 miles; the sky is covered with light cumulus and an easterly wind has sprung up, force 2 to 3.

Bowers went back again with Meares and managed to ferry over some wind clothes and odds and ends.

We had a keen north wind to-night and a haze, but wind is dropping and sun shining brightly again.

We had a keen north wind to-night and a haze, but wind is dropping and sun shining brightly again.

The weather has been very warm and fine on the whole, with occasional gleams of sunshine, but to-night there is a rather chill wind from the south.

We had a strongish northerly breeze at midday with snow and hail storms, and now the wind has turned to the south and the sky is overcast with threatenings of a blizzard.

The wind increased to force six or seven at the ship, and continued to blow, with drift, throughout the forenoon.

It is a first-rate building in an extraordinarily sheltered spot; whilst the wind was raging at the ship this morning we enjoyed comparative peace.

The wind began to drop at midday, and after lunch I went to the ship.

To-night the wind has dropped altogether and we return to the glorious conditions of a week ago.

Thursday, January 12.Bright sun again all day, but in the afternoon a chill wind from the S.S.W. Again we are reminded of the shelter afforded by our position; to-night the anemometers on Observatory Hill show a 20-mile winddown in our valley we only have mild puffs.

The wind was strong from the S.S.E. yesterday morning, sweeping over the camp; the temperature fell to 15ยฐ, the sky became overcast.

The wind is very persistent from the S.S.E., rising and falling; to-night it has sprung up again, and is rattling the canvas of the tent.

The morning promised well and the day fulfilled the promise: we had bright sunshine and practically no wind.

Towards the Glacier Tongue there were some heaps of snow much wind blown.

Shackleton reported that the door had been forced by the wind, but that he had made an entrance by the window and found shelter insideother members of his party used it for shelter.

The ponies don't like the wind, but they are all standing the cold wonderfully and all their sores are healed up.

Later in the forenoon the wind dropped and the sun shone forth.

Rather significant of a blizzard if we had not had such a lot of wind lately.

The wind has been boisterous all day, to advantage after the last snow fall, as it has been drifting the loose snow along and hardening the surfaces.

First the felt boots and felt slippers made by Jaeger and then summer wind clothes and fur mitsnothing could be better than these articles.

I have an idea to use putties to secure our wind trousers to the finnesko.

The wind has turned to the north to-night and is blowing quite fresh.

Fearing a little trouble I went out of the hut in the middle of the night and saw at once that she was having a bad timethe ice was breaking with a northerly swell and the wind increasing, with the ship on dead lee shore; luckily the ice anchors had been put well in on the floe and some still held.

In the afternoon the ship returned to the northern ice edge; the wind was still strong (about N. 30 W.) and loose ice all along the edgeour people went out with the ice anchors and I saw the ship pass west again.

The wind dropped as she came off, and she is now securely moored off the northern ice edge, where I hope the greater number of her people are finding rest.

In conclusion, allow me to remark that the results of my investigation, of which but a succinct account has been given here, negative certain derivations, which have been believed in, though they have never been proved; such as that of the form I have last discussed from the Assyrian palmetta, or from a cypress bent down by the wind.

The tarantass (Fig. 22), drawn by three nimble horses, flies through the endless deserts with wind-like rapidity.

The matted dounga looked as though it might be chilly, particularly if a strong wind came to play among the rather draughty-looking mats which were all that our poor friend had between her and a cold world!

" Living much out of doors, in the sun and wind, will no doubt produce a certain roughness of character,will cause a thicker cuticle to grow over some of the finer qualities of our nature, as on the face and hands, or as severe manual labor robs the hands of some of their delicacy of touch.

Perhaps we should be more susceptible to some influences important to our intellectual and moral growth, if the sun had shone and the wind blown on us a little less; and no doubt it is a nice matter to proportion rightly the thick and thin skin.

And constantly the boat drew nearer, as I said; they were almost within hail; Dan saw her hair streaming on the wind; he waited only for the long wave.

So the days went in cloud and wind.