Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
Do we say   you   or  ll

Do we say you or ll

you 694953 occurrences

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But during the present lecture we have been considering the gradual transfer of the preponderance of physical strength from the hands of the war-loving portion of the human race into the hands of the peace-loving portion,into the hands of the dollar-hunters, if you please, but out of the hands of the scalp-hunters.

On fine sunny days they sit on the banks of rivers or lakes, or on the branches of trees, combing and arranging their golden locks: "Know you the Nixes, gay and fair?

And there is the well-known saying current throughout the country: "If you find an even ash or a four-leaved clover, Rest assured you'll see your true love ere the day is over.

And there is the well-known saying current throughout the country: "If you find an even ash or a four-leaved clover, Rest assured you'll see your true love ere the day is over.

" From the "Shepherd's Calendar" we learn that, "If in the fall of the leaf in October many leaves wither on the boughs and hang there, it betokens a frosty winter and much snow," with which may be compared a Devonshire saying: "If good apples you would have The leaves must go into the grave.

" Or, in other words, "you must plant your trees in the fall of the leaf.

Calm weather in June "sets corn in tune;" and a Suffolk adage says: "Cut your thistles before St. John, You will have two instead of one.

"I tell you that outfit is great friends o' mine.

If I tell you you won't tell nobody, Lul-Luke, wuh-will yuh?" Luke was understood to state that no clam could be tighter-mouthed.

If I tell you you won't tell nobody, Lul-Luke, wuh-will yuh?" Luke was understood to state that no clam could be tighter-mouthed.

It would make him think the wrong way, you bet.

"Because lingery is a certain kind of clo'es, you ignorant Jack.

"Aw, you don't need any lantern," objected the proprietor.

Can't you find yore way to the hotel in the dark?

That crack on the topknot didn't blind you, did it?"

" "I'll get you a lantern then," grumbled the proprietor.

"I didn't know you fell down inside the barn," Racey observed.

"There's lots you dunno," said Luke, ungraciously.

Don't you go for to lacerate 'em.

I ain't owing you a dime, you know.

I ain't owing you a dime, you know.

C'mon, Luke, get a move on you.

"But how come you had yore boots off?"

"Don't try to tell me you stuck 'em behind that wagon-seat on purpose to trip him.

You never knowed he was comin'.

"Those boots were laid out all special for you.

" "For me?" "For you." "But why for me?"

"Because, Swing, old settler, I didn't like you this afternoon.

The more I saw you over there on that porch the less I liked you.

The more I saw you over there on that porch the less I liked you.

So I took off my boots and hid 'em careful like behind the wagon-seat so they'd stick out some, and you'd see 'em and think I was there asleep, and naturally you'd go for to wake me up and wouldn't think of looking behind the crate where I was laying for you all ready to hop on yore neck the second you stooped over the wagon-seat and give you the Dutch rub for glommin' all the fun this afternoon.

So I took off my boots and hid 'em careful like behind the wagon-seat so they'd stick out some, and you'd see 'em and think I was there asleep, and naturally you'd go for to wake me up and wouldn't think of looking behind the crate where I was laying for you all ready to hop on yore neck the second you stooped over the wagon-seat and give you the Dutch rub for glommin' all the fun this afternoon.

So I took off my boots and hid 'em careful like behind the wagon-seat so they'd stick out some, and you'd see 'em and think I was there asleep, and naturally you'd go for to wake me up and wouldn't think of looking behind the crate where I was laying for you all ready to hop on yore neck the second you stooped over the wagon-seat and give you the Dutch rub for glommin' all the fun this afternoon.

So I took off my boots and hid 'em careful like behind the wagon-seat so they'd stick out some, and you'd see 'em and think I was there asleep, and naturally you'd go for to wake me up and wouldn't think of looking behind the crate where I was laying for you all ready to hop on yore neck the second you stooped over the wagon-seat and give you the Dutch rub for glommin' all the fun this afternoon.

So I took off my boots and hid 'em careful like behind the wagon-seat so they'd stick out some, and you'd see 'em and think I was there asleep, and naturally you'd go for to wake me up and wouldn't think of looking behind the crate where I was laying for you all ready to hop on yore neck the second you stooped over the wagon-seat and give you the Dutch rub for glommin' all the fun this afternoon.

"You wouldn't 'a' tried to knife me, anyway.

You better believe he did.

Don't you remember what I said about a knife in the night, or a shot in the dark?

Man, do you have to be killed before you're convinced?

Man, do you have to be killed before you're convinced?

"I'm the most wantin' feller you ever saw.

Just now this minute I want you to tell me where it was you met up with Bill Smith and what it was he did so bad that you and Marie think you've got a hold on him.

Just now this minute I want you to tell me where it was you met up with Bill Smith and what it was he did so bad that you and Marie think you've got a hold on him.

Just now this minute I want you to tell me where it was you met up with Bill Smith and what it was he did so bad that you and Marie think you've got a hold on him.

Just now this minute I want you to tell me where it was you met up with Bill Smith and what it was he did so bad that you and Marie think you've got a hold on him.

" "You was listenin' quite a while," muttered Bull.

" "But you didn't listen quite hard enough," suggested Bull.

I'm expecting you to sort of fill in the gaps.

"No, you got another guess comin'.

"You must forget I heard all about how you tried to bushwhack me from the second floor of the Starlight," Racey put in, gently.

"You must forget I heard all about how you tried to bushwhack me from the second floor of the Starlight," Racey put in, gently.

You heard wrong.

" "Dunno as I blame you.

If any damn man kicks you, Bull, you got a right to drill him every time.

If any damn man kicks you, Bull, you got a right to drill him every time.

And you think I kicked you?" "I know you did.

And you think I kicked you?" "I know you did.

And you think I kicked you?" "I know you did.

" "You know I did, huh?

Did you see me do it?" "You kicked me after you'd knocked me silly with that bottle.

Did you see me do it?" "You kicked me after you'd knocked me silly with that bottle.

Did you see me do it?" "You kicked me after you'd knocked me silly with that bottle.

" "So I did all that to you after you were down, huh?

" "So I did all that to you after you were down, huh?

Who told you?" "Nemmine who told me.

You done it, that's enough.

I want to know who told you?" "I ain't sayin'."

It was either one or both of 'em told you.

Now I dunno whether you'll believe it or not but to tell the truth and be plain with you, Bull, I didn't kick you.

Now I dunno whether you'll believe it or not but to tell the truth and be plain with you, Bull, I didn't kick you.

Now I dunno whether you'll believe it or not but to tell the truth and be plain with you, Bull, I didn't kick you.

" "I don't believe you."

"I wouldn't expect you tounder t

What I'm tellin' you is true alla same.

Lookit, you fool, is it likely after takin' the trouble to knock you down, I'd kick you besides?

Lookit, you fool, is it likely after takin' the trouble to knock you down, I'd kick you besides?

Lookit, you fool, is it likely after takin' the trouble to knock you down, I'd kick you besides?

Aren't you sure?" "Not yet; I am not near enough to see properly.

"Please sit there, Dawson, facing the light," said I. "Let me have a good look at you."

A more striking picture you cannot imagine.

You must not suppose the stream to be clear like the Aar, for it is as thick as pea-soup, and about the same colour, being in fact a river of trass in solution.

You may almost fancy yourself on magic ground, and looking on a fairy castle, so peculiar is the effect.

You have heard of this, dear friend?

Since you are so soon to be a princess, I'll give you leave to write down your song.

General, the Emperor would see you.

The Emperor will receive you presently.

My lads, you must not speak the one to the other until I have again seen you.

My lads, you must not speak the one to the other until I have again seen you.

Do you promise? BOYS.

General, a word with you.

Do you think we could capture this man? PIERRE.

That you could not, my lad, for the man is now here, in camp.

"I've ker-come to see you about the debt which my nun-nephew, Mark, owes the estate.

If you had a claim against the United States how would you get your money? 10.

If you had a claim against the United States how would you get your money? 10.

His new-born courage, however, was in some degree damped by Leonard, who observed to him in an undertone: "You have neglected my injunctions, sirrah, and allowed the person I warned you of to enter the house.

His mother and the young man were still in attendance, and the former, on seeing her daughter-in-law, exclaimed, in low but angry accents"What brings you here, Judith?

"I will promise in return that I will not look at another man in a matrimonial way until the four years are up, so you need not be jealous and worry yourself; for, Hal, you can trust me, can you not?" Taking my hand in his and looking at me with a world of love in his eyes, which moved me in spite of myself, he said: "I could trust you in every way to the end of the world.

"I will promise in return that I will not look at another man in a matrimonial way until the four years are up, so you need not be jealous and worry yourself; for, Hal, you can trust me, can you not?" Taking my hand in his and looking at me with a world of love in his eyes, which moved me in spite of myself, he said: "I could trust you in every way to the end of the world.

ll 592 occurrences

By Prof. T. H. HUXLEY, | | LL.

ll x 17-1/2for $7.00 | | | |

ll x 17-1/2for $7.00 | | | |

ll x 17-1/2for $7.00 | | | |

[Footnote Ll:

, ll. 11, 12 Compare the 'Laws of Manu', i. 49: "Vegetables, as well as animals, have internal consciousness, and are sensible of pleasure and pain.

Compare Cowper's 'Task', i. ll. 205, 206.

LL I DEDICATE

" Odes, ii. 14, ll. 21-29. 4to.

Horace, Od. i. 12, ll. 37, 38: "Regulum, et Scauros animaeque magnae Prodigum Paulum.

Ll llama, f., flame.

ll. 10 and 11.

p. 91, ll. 6-11.

p. 97, ll. 1729.

ll. 38 and 39 and p. 122, ll.

ll. 38 and 39 and p. 122, ll.

p. 122, ll. 6 and 7.

l. 39 and p. 123, ll. 118.

p. 123, ll. 2226.

l. 29 and p. 124, ll. 419.

ll. 3840 and p. 125, ll. 1 and 2.

ll. 3840 and p. 125, ll. 1 and 2.

p. 125, ll. 510.

Two lines ending not, ye. ll. 23 and 24.

p. 126, ll. 1 and 2.

ll. 33 and 34.

l. 39 and p. 128, ll. l3.

p. 128, ll. 19 and 20.

l. 38 and p. 129, ll. 111.

p. 129, ll. 1214.

p. 130, ll. 620.

l. 34 and p. 132, ll.

p. 132, ll. 1517.

ll. 20 and 21. Prose.

ll. 2638 and p. 134, ll. 112.

ll. 2638 and p. 134, ll. 112.

p. 134, ll. 1435.

p. 135, ll. 3 and 4.

p. 136, ll. 2 and 3.

p. 137, ll. 822.

ll. 2939 and p. 138, ll. 16.

ll. 2939 and p. 138, ll. 16.

p. 138, ll. 3336.

F and G print last 2 ll.

4,7, ll, 12; "Auberge de la Bouteille" (inn).

Kk Kk Ll Ll K is for Kite, for Kid, and for Key, For Kiss, and for Keg, and for Keep; L is for Lamb, for Lad, and for Lee, For Lip, and for Leg, and for Leap.

Kk Kk Ll Ll K is for Kite, for Kid, and for Key, For Kiss, and for Keg, and for Keep; L is for Lamb, for Lad, and for Lee, For Lip, and for Leg, and for Leap.

[Footnote ll: finch or linnet]

Extending from a point, o, in the main line, near the transmitting station, to the earth at G, is a branch conductor, l, containing an adjustable artificial resistance, R. A similar conductor, ll, extends from a point, o', near the receiving terminal of the line, L, to the conductor, 3, in which an artificial resistance, R', is also included, this resistance being preferably approximately equal to the resistance,

The operation of my improved system is as follows: While the apparatus is at rest a constant current from the battery, E', traverses the line, L, and the branch conductors, l, and ll, dividing itself between them, in inverse proportion to their respective resistances, in accordance with the well-known law of Ohm.

When the transmitting pattern strip, P, is caused to pass between the roller, T, and the stylus, t, electric impulses will be transmitted upon the line, L, from the positive pole of the battery, E, which will traverse the main line, L, the two branch lines, l, and ll, and their included resistances, and also the receiving instrument, M.

This hospital is very nice and when you come down from London youll see all the flowers and the gramophone which is a fair treat.

"Yet he has spelled chappelling, bordeller, medallist, metalline, metallist, metallize, clavellated, &c. with ll, contrary to his rule.

"Again, he has spelled cancelation and snively with single l, and cupellation, pannellation, wittolly, with ll."Ib.

UNDER RULE VIII.OF FINAL LL.

[FORMULE.Not proper, because the word "evill" is here written with final ll.

But, according to Rule 8th, "Final ll is peculiar to monosyllables and their compounds, with the few derivatives formed from such roots by prefixes; consequently, all other words that end in l, must be terminated with a single l."

What says Rule 8th of final ll, and of final l single?

"He cannot assert that ll are inserted in fullness to denote the sound of u."Cobb's Review of Webster, p. 11.

"He cannot assert that ll (i.e., double Ell) is inserted in fullness to denote the sound of u"Cobb cor.

BREESE, WILLIAM LL.

ll by this female patronage, as to obtain an order for transferring us hither.

During the greater part of 1810, he was employed on the combinations of oxymuriatic gas and oxygen; and towards the close of the same year, he delivered a course of lectures before the Dublin Society, and received from Trinity College, Dublin, the honorary degree of LL.

p. 326, ll. 18 and 19.

p. 327, ll. 2-10.

p. 328, ll. 5 and 6.

In A the words 'my state would rather ask a curse' are printed by mistake between ll. 16 and 17.

p. 248, ll. 3 and 4.

ll. 21 and 22.

ll. 4 and 5. F and G] be the hour that.

l. 7. AG] is a. ll. 9 and 10.

ll. 19 and 20. F and G] ye have ...hate ye. l. 23.

ll. 4 and 5. F and G omit]

(Pleine Mer, ll. 125-6.)

Since the beginning of the administration of the next principal, James M. Garnett, LL.

The four years' administration of its present principal, Thomas Fell, LL. D., has been a most successful one, and St. John's is fulfilling the purpose of its founders "to train up and perpetuate a succession of able and honest men, for discharging the various offices and duties of life, both civil and religious, with usefulness and reputation.

Grateful acknowledgments will always be due to these three gentlemen: Charles W. Eliot, LL.

D., President of Harvard University, Andrew D. White, LL.

D., President of Cornell University, and James B. Angell, LL.

The names of the professors in the Faculty of Philosophy, from 1876 to 1890, are as follows, arranged in the order of their appointment: 1876 BASIL L. GILDERSLEEVE, LL.

1876 J.J. SYLVESTER, LL.

1883 PAUL HAUPT, Ph. D Semitic Languages. 1884 G. STANLEY HALL, LL.

1884 SIMON NEWCOMB, LL.

In the final text of 1836 the two stanzas of 1819 are compressed into one (ll. 446-50).

I. F.] This "extract" will be found in the fifth book of 'The Prelude', ll. 364-397.

* * FOOTNOTE ON THE TEXT [Footnote A: See Spenser's translation of 'Virgil's Gnat', ll. 21-2: 'Or where on Mount Parnasse, the Muses brood.

It is an extract from 'Troilus and Cressida', book v. ll. 518-686.Ed.]

ON THE TEXT [Footnote A: This may be an imperfect reminiscence of 'Comus', ll. 634-5.Ed.]

417, ll. 66-69: 'Some inward trouble suddenly Broke from the Matron's strong black eye A remnant of uneasy light, A flash of something over-bright!' Ed.]

The extract is from 'The Shepherds Hunting', eclogue fourth, ll. 368-80.Ed.]

ll. 28-9.Ed.]

The last phrase of this note was actually printed: "the fu ll consonant rhyme."

As no letters seem to logically fit in the empty space between "fu" and "ll," I have replaced this with the word "full" in the text above.

ll. 2-4. B] Dramatis Personae.

p. 209, ll. 6 and 27.

p. 227, ll. 7 and 18.

p. 251, ll. 12 and 37 and often elsewhere.

He said that if all decided to go that way he would go and help them, even if they went to h-ll, but as it was he could not.

IF I HAD BUT GIVEN HIM WORD "COME, NOW, MY PRETTY PRISONER" "WE 'LL TEK CARE

I hop youll be very very angry with him because its my birthday and I didnt get your parsel.