Inspirassion

Pick Elegant Words
53 examples of  ys  in sentences

53 examples of ys in sentences

The com kyng Egbryth Ant wyth batyle ant fyht Made al Englond yhol Falle to ys oune dol; Ant sethe he reignede her Ahte ant tuenti folle yer: At Wynchestre lyggeth ys bon, Buried in a marble-ston.

The com kyng Egbryth Ant wyth batyle ant fyht Made al Englond yhol Falle to ys oune dol; Ant sethe he reignede her Ahte ant tuenti folle yer: At Wynchestre lyggeth ys bon, Buried in a marble-ston.

[THE BODDYNGE FLOURETTES BLOSHES ATTE THE LYGHTE] FYRSTE MYNSTRELLE The boddynge flourettes bloshes atte the lyghte; The mees be sprenged wyth the yellowe hue; Ynn daiseyd mantels ys the mountayne dyghte; The nesh yonge coweslepe blendethe wyth the dewe; The trees enlefรจd, yntoe Heavenne straughte, Whenn gentle wyndes doe blowe to whestlyng dynne ys brought.

[THE BODDYNGE FLOURETTES BLOSHES ATTE THE LYGHTE] FYRSTE MYNSTRELLE The boddynge flourettes bloshes atte the lyghte; The mees be sprenged wyth the yellowe hue; Ynn daiseyd mantels ys the mountayne dyghte; The nesh yonge coweslepe blendethe wyth the dewe; The trees enlefรจd, yntoe Heavenne straughte, Whenn gentle wyndes doe blowe to whestlyng dynne ys brought.

The evenynge commes, and brynges the dewe alonge; The roddie welkynne sheeneth to the eyne; Arounde the alestake Mynstrells synge the songe; Yonge ivie rounde the doore poste do entwyne; I laie mee onn the grasse; yette, to mie wylle, Albeytte alle ys fayre, there lackethe somethynge stylle.

Daunce ne moe atte hallie daie; Lycke a reynynge ryver bee: Mie love ys dedde, Gon to hys death-bedde, Al under the wyllowe tree.

Blacke hys cryne as the wyntere nyghte, Whyte hys rode as the sommer snowe, Rodde hys face as the mornynge lyghte; Cale he lyes ynne the grave belowe: Mie love ys dedde, Gon to hys deathe-bedde, Al under the wyllowe tree.

lyes bie the wyllowe tree: Mie love ys dedde, Gonne to hys deathe-bedde, Alle underre the wyllowe tree.

the dethe-owle loude dothe synge, To the nyghte-mares as heie goe: Mie love ys dedde, Gonne to hys deathe-bedde, Al under the wyllowe tree.

the whyte moone sheenes onne hie; Whyterre ys mie true loves shroude, Whyterre yanne the mornynge skie, Whyterre yanne the evenynge cloude: Mie love ys dedde, Gon to hys deathe-bedde, Al under the wyllowe tree.

the whyte moone sheenes onne hie; Whyterre ys mie true loves shroude, Whyterre yanne the mornynge skie, Whyterre yanne the evenynge cloude: Mie love ys dedde, Gon to hys deathe-bedde, Al under the wyllowe tree.

Heere, uponne mie true loves grave, Schalle the baren fleurs be layde, Nee one hallie Seyncte to save Al the celness of a mayde: Mie love ys dedde, Gonne to hys deathe-bedde, Alle under the wyllowe tree.

Wythe mie hondes I'lle dente the brieres Rounde his hallie corse to gre; Ouphante fairie, lyghte youre fyres, Heere mie boddie stylle schalle bee: Mie love ys dedde, Gon to hys death-bedde, Al under the wyllowe tree.

Comme, wythe acorne-coppe and thorne Drayne mie hartys blodde awaie; Lyfe and all yttes goode I scorne, Daunce bie nete, or feaste by dale: Mie love ys dedde, Gon to hys death-bedde, Al under the wyllowe tree.

There is the finest poetry, however, too, in the lineI give it now letter for letter: But think that God ys ther he was.

Imitate his virtues, exercyses, studyes and accyons, hee ys a rare ornament of thys age.'

" A famous spring lyric beginning: "Lenten ys come with love to toune, With blosmen ant with briddes roune.

Among the lyrics, read specially, "Sumer is i-cumen in," "Alysoun," "Lenten ys come with love to toune," and "Blow, Northern Wind.

What new appreciation of nature do the thirteenth-century lyrics show? Point out at least twelve definite concrete references to nature in "Lenten ys come with love to toune."

Beneath is inscribed: Judicio pylivm genio socratem, arte maronem, Terra tegit, popvlvs mรฆret, Olympvs Habet[A] Stay, passenger; why goest thov by so fast? Read, if thov canst, whom enviovs death hath plast Within this monvment; Shakespeare, with whom Quick natvre dide; whose name doth deck ys.

all my request Ys for a nobile knyghte, Who, tho' mayhap he has done wronge, Hee thoughte ytt stylle was righte.

The reasons for the desolation of Kidland are graphically set forth:"In somer seasons when good peace ys betwene England and Scotland, th'inhabitantes of dyv'se townes thereaboutes repayres up with theyr cattall in som'ynge (summering) as ys aforesaid, and so have used to do of longe tyme.

The reasons for the desolation of Kidland are graphically set forth:"In somer seasons when good peace ys betwene England and Scotland, th'inhabitantes of dyv'se townes thereaboutes repayres up with theyr cattall in som'ynge (summering) as ys aforesaid, and so have used to do of longe tyme.

ys comes along with a too complete happiness.

"A payne ys made that no person or persons that shall brewe any weddyn ale to sell, shall not brewe aboue twelve stryke of mault at the most, and that the said persons so marryed shall not keep nor haue above eyght messe of persons at hys dinner within the burrowe, and before hys brydall daye he shall keep no unlawfull games in hys house nor out of hys house on payne of 20s.

6 The strengthe of a realme ys a ryghteouse kyng Deut.

Till the seventeenth century, the possessive case was written without the apostrophe; being formed at different times, in es, is, ys, or s, like the plural; and apparently without rule or uniformity in respect to the doubling of the final consonant: as Goddes, Godes, Godis, Godys, or Gods, for God's; so mannes, mannis, mannys or mans, for man's.

"Thah mi tonge were made of stel, Ant min herte yzote of bras, The goodness myht y never telle, That with kyng Edward was: Kyng, as thou art cleped conquerour, In uch battaille thou hadest prys; God bringe thi soule to the honour, That ever wes ant ever ys.

Arst he adde at Rome ybe, and, vor ys grete wysdom, The pope Leo hym blessede, tho he thuder com, And the kynges croune of hys lond, that in this lond gut ys: And he led hym to be kyng, ar he kyng were y wys.

Arst he adde at Rome ybe, and, vor ys grete wysdom, The pope Leo hym blessede, tho he thuder com, And the kynges croune of hys lond, that in this lond gut ys: And he led hym to be kyng, ar he kyng were y wys.

" "Clere he was god ynou, and gut, as me telleth me, He was more than ten ger old, ar he couthe ys abece.

Ac ys gode moder ofte smale gyftes hym tok, Vor to byleue other pie, and loky on ys boke.

Ac ys gode moder ofte smale gyftes hym tok, Vor to byleue other pie, and loky on ys boke.

So that by por clergye ys rygt lawes he wonde, That neuere

er nere y mad to gouerny ys lond.

Jhesu the suete ys hert blod for-lete

For the love of me; Ys woundes waxen wete, thei wepen, still and mete, Marie reweth me.

This ending was sometimes the same as that of the plural; and both were changed to is or ys, before they became what we now find them.

Thus the plural termination en has become entirely obsolete; th or eth is no longer in common use; ed is contracted in pronunciation; the ancient ys or is, of the third person singular, is changed to s or es, and is usually added without increase of syllables; and st or est has, in part, adopted the analogy.

3. HE, hee, hie, se;His, hise, is, hys, ys, hyse, hus;HIM, hine, hiene, hion, hen, hyne, hym, im;THEY, thay, thei, the, tha, thai, thii, yai, hi, hie, heo, hig, hyg, hy;THEIR or THEIRS, ther, theyr, theyrs, thair, thare, theora, hare, here, her, hir, hire, hira, hiora, hiera, heora, hyra;THEM, thym, theym, thaym, thaim, thame, tham, em, hem, heom, hiom, eom, hom, him, hi, hig.

God have mercye on thy innocent sowle, Which amonges innocentes, I am sure, hath a place, Or ellys thy sowle ys yn a hevy case; Ye, ye, and moo foolys many [a] one, For foolys be alyve, Love, though thou be gone.

unexpected force Yt ys a Horse of Clothes.

The new tennor ys. xiijC

di The greatest bell ys xxjC and di at lvjs.

the C. The iiij bell ys xvijC and di and xiiij lb.

Short form Ys.

Short form Ys.

I thought I should have found a great companye in the churche, and when I came there, the churche dore was faste locked; I tarried halfe an houre and more, and at last the keye was founde, and one of the parishe commes to me, and sayes, 'Syr, thys ys a busye day with us, we cannot heare you; it is Robyn Hoode's day; the parishe is gone abroad to gather for Robyn Hoode.'

it soe oft falls out yt some witches shall by confession discour ys, or by true testimonies be convicted.

Ibid., 203 ("Yt ys also agreyd that goodman Tomson shall from hence forthe paye vnto the p[ar]yshe for hys byldynge into the Churche yarde 12d.

PASSING THE DOOM OF YS TIME'S GARDEN THE COMING OF LOVE PREMONITION THE CHILD INTRUSION THE SEA'S WITHHOLDING LOVE

The Doom of Ys DO you hear the bell?

When the moon's at full and the long tide creeps It rings o'er the town that the deep sea keeps The town of Ys, that, unafraid, Cursed God's good bells for the noise they made, Cursed them well and pulled them down From every belfry in the town!