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17 collocations for « prides »

17 collocations for « prides »

  • The Folly therefore lyes here: We are apt to pride our selves in worthless, or perhaps shameful Things; and, on the other hand, count that disgraceful which is our truest Glory.
  • For Elsley had a dread more nervous than really coward of infectious diseases; and he had also (and prided himself, too, on having) all Goethe's dislike of anything terrible or horrible, of sickness, disease, wounds, death, anything which jarred with that "beautiful" which was his idol.
  • They prided themselves on being men of honour in the way of trade; enemies to deceit, and only robbing in their own way.
  • The bliss of man (could pride that blessing find) Is not to act or think beyond mankind; No powers of body or of soul to share,
  • "One half the struggle of physical training has been won when a boy can be induced to take a genuine interest in his bodily condition,to want to remedy its defects, and to pride himself on the purity of his skin, the firmness of his muscles, and the uprightness of his figure.
  • Why had she been so mad, so infatuated, as to reject with scorn and pride the hand and heart of one so noble, so fond, so superior as Eugene St. Eval?
  • "I have, and pride myself on having, A more retentive head than she.
  • But Mr. Tylor's reading, in harmony with his general theory, is different: 'It seems, rather, that the sage was, in fact, upholding the tradition of the ancient faith, thus acting according to the character on which he prided himselfthat of a transmitter, not a maker, a preserver of old knowledge, not a new revealer.'
  • and then another, and at last, when there was on'y three or four of 'em left, Henery Walker, wot prided himself on 'is artfulness, 'ad an idea.
  • Mrs. Margaret was accordingly provided for, for life, with the addition of a little homespun linen, and stockings of her own knitting; but, as she held it a mighty piece of extravagance to alter a handsome dress, she wore her godmother's clothes in the fashion in which she found them, and prided herself not a little in having silks for every season of the year.
  • The sculptor's art was not born until piety had already edifices in which to worship God, or pride the monuments in which it sought the glories of a name; but it made rapid progress as wealth increased and taste became refined; as the need was felt for ornaments and symbols to adorn naked walls and empty spaces, especially statuary, grouped or single, of men or animals,a marble history to interpret or reproduce consecrated associations.
  • pride oneself on; glory in, take a pride in; pique oneself, plume oneself, hug oneself; stand upon, be proud of; put a good face on; not hide one's light under a bushel, not put one's talent in a napkin; not think small beer of oneself &c (vanity) 880.
  • This offer drew to Ellicott City a number of people who had bloodhounds that were trained to hunt Negroessome coming from Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Howard and counties of southern Maryland, each owner priding his pack as being the best pack in the town.
  • The sum, in fact, of the whole matter appears to be, that the sentiment on which Sterne so prided himselfthe acute sensibilities which he regarded with such extraordinary complacency, were, as has been before observed, the weakness, and not the strength, of his pathetic style.
  • Anthony prides her team on running a clean race.
  • Can't a Dutchman see a joke?" After that, the elder and his wife used to come out to see me, bringing Virginia with them, almost every week, and I prided myself greatly on my fried chicken my nice salt-rising bread, my garden vegetables, my green corn, my butter, milk and cream.
  • He had had his passions, his intrigues, in past years, and prided himselffew men moreon understanding women; but the expression of the face, and the strange words with which she had greeted him, added to the broad fact of her having offered her own life for his, raised in him a feeling of chivalrous awe and admiration, which no other woman had ever called up.

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